Tuesday October 22, 2019
Home Science & Technology Wireless Sign...

Wireless Signals Can Read Human Emotions: Researchers

The research shows wireless signals can capture the information about human behaviour that's not visible to naked eye.

1
//
A new wireless devices monitors heart and breathing rate to predict human emotions Image Courtsey:Pixbay

.repubhubembed{display:none;}

This article was originally published on the International Business Times. Researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory have created a device that can read human emotions using wireless signals. The EQ-Radio reads subtle changes in breathing and heart rhythms to figure out if a person is happy, excited, angry or sad. The device measures….repubhubembed{display:none;}


  • Anubhuti Gupta

    I feel that this discovery could have a lot of applications in the psychiatry field and help a lot of people because often people aren’t aware of their feelings themselves

Next Story

10x Blacker Material Than Anything Reported By MIT Engineers

Engineers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have created a material that they claim is 10 times blacker than anything

0
MIT, Engineers, Black material, Science
The dome at the MIT campus. Wikimedia Commons

Engineers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have created a material that they claim is 10 times blacker than anything that has previously been reported.

The material is made from vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, or CNTs — microscopic filaments of carbon that the team grew on a surface of chlorine-etched aluminum foil.

The foil captures more than 99.96 per cent of any incoming light, making it the blackest material on record, according to a study published in the journal ACS-Applied Materials and Interfaces.

MIT, Engineers, Black material, Science
Our material is 10 times blacker than anything that’s ever been reported. Pixabay

The material may be useful, for instance in optical blinders that reduce unwanted glare, to help space telescopes spot orbiting exoplanets, said Brian Wardle, Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at the MIT.

ALSO READ: Electric Vehicle Maker Tesla Teases Model S with ‘Plaid Powertrain’

“There are optical and space science applications for very black materials, and of course, artists have been interested in black, going back well before the Renaissance.

“Our material is 10 times blacker than anything that’s ever been reported, but I think the blackest black is a constantly moving target. Someone will find a blacker material, and eventually we’ll understand all the underlying mechanisms, and will be able to properly engineer the ultimate blac,” he added. (IANS)