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Worlds Day for Water: 5 water conservation ways that are ideal for Indian conditions

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By Ishan Kukreti

This day, 22 years ago, UN decided to recognize 22nd March as the ‘World Day for Water.’   On this day, all the UN members implemented water conservation as recommended by the UN.

According to UNWater, 783 million people do not have access to clean water. World water demand will rise up by 70% till 2050, while many places will see declining water availability. Water is a limited resource and has to be conserved for humanity to survive.

To celebrate the day, here is a list of innovative water conservative techniques which one, irrespective of their geography or profession, can make use of to save some nectar for life.

Rooftop rain water harvesting

It is the most conventional and widely used rainwater harvesting techniques. Rooftop rain harvesting is the easiest way to collect rain water for household purpose.

Building a catchment area is required to take the rainwater down into the underground tank through several filters. The harvested water can also be used to replenish ground level water.

Suitable for – Anyone who owns a house with a roof.

Cost – Rs. 10,000 – Rs. 30,000

Cycle run water pumps

In 1980 Nasiruddin Gayen, a small farmer from West Bengal conceptualized this unique invention. Instead of mechanical motors a cycle pump is used. The process not only reduces the cost of fuel but makes the person pump the amount that is required.

Paddling the cycle creates an up and down movement in the pump and this can release 100 liters of water per minutes

Suitable for – Small scale farmers, can also be used in urban settings

Cost – Less than Rs. 7000

Rainwater syringe

This method can be used to harvest rainwater in the coastal areas to dilute groundwater salinity where there is a problem of saline ground water.

Rainwater is collected from the roofs and is stored in a pressure tank. With the help of PVC pipes, the water is then transferred below the sea level of 16-24 ft. The water gets stored in the vertical groundwater column and can be used later with the help of a pump or motor.

Suitable for – Coastal areas

Cost – N.A

Joy Pumps

This is an absolutely fun filled way of conserving water. In this technique, under a merry-go-round or a see-saw, a conventional hand pump apparatus is fixed.

A tank (8-10 feet above ground level) is filled with ground water as the kids play on these rides.

This technique has been designed to cope with water scarcity problems in villages with no clear surface water source, electricity issues and high poverty.

Suitable for – Schools, parks, villages and relief camps.

Cost – N.A

Ferro-Cement Tanks

This is a cheap and durable method of rain water harvesting. All it requires to make a Ferro-cement tank is sand, cement, mild steel bar and galvanized iron wire mesh and semi-skilled laborers.

These tanks are light in weight and can last up to 25 years. The tanks can store up to 1000-2000 liters of water.

Suitable for – High rainfall regions

Cost- N.A

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Copyright 2015 NewsGram

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Earth Will Reach 1.5 Degrees Above Pre-Industrial Levels By 2030

Countries in the southern hemisphere will be among the worse off.

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climate, global warming, celsisus
An aerial view of downtown San Francisco, California

The UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) on Monday said the planet will reach the crucial threshold of 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels by 2030, precipitating the risk of extreme drought, wildfires, floods and food shortages for hundreds of millions of people.

In a report, the IPCC said that governments around the world must take “rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society” to avoid disastrous levels of global warming, CNN reported.

The date, which falls well within the lifetime of many people alive today, is based on current levels of greenhouse gas emissions.

The planet is already two-thirds of the way there, with global temperatures having warmed about 1 degree Celsius. Avoiding going even higher will require significant action in the next few years, the report said.

climate, global warming, celsisu
A fisherman stands on his boat as he fishes at the Tisma lagoon wetland park, also designated as Ramsar Site 1141 in the Convention on Wetlands, in Tisma, Nicaragua. VOA

Global net emissions of carbon dioxide would need to fall by 45 per cent from 2010 levels by 2030 and reach “net zero” around 2050 in order to keep the warming around 1.5 degrees Celsius.

Lowering emissions to this degree, while technically possible, would require widespread changes in energy, industry, buildings, transportation and cities, according to the report.

“One of the key messages that comes out very strongly from this report is that we are already seeing the consequences of 1 degree Celsius of global warming through more extreme weather, rising sea levels and diminishing Arctic sea ice, among other changes,” said Panmao Zhai, co-chair of IPCC Working Group I.

Coral reefs will also be drastically effected, with between 70 and 90 per cent expected to die off, including Australia’s Great Barrier Reef.

climate, global warming, celsisus
Waves from Hurricane Florence pound the Bogue Inlet Pier in Emerald Isle, N.C. VOA

Countries in the southern hemisphere will be among the worse off, the report said, adding “projected to experience the largest impacts on economic growth due to climate change should global warming increase”.

“Every extra bit of warming matters, especially since warming of 1.5 degrees C or higher increases the risk associated with long-lasting or irreversible changes, such as the loss of some eco-systems,” CNN quoted Hans-Otto Pörtner, Co-Chair of IPCC Working Group II, as saying.

Monday’s report is three years in the making and is a direct result of the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement.

Also Read: Paris Adopts Climate Action Plan, Aims At Achieving A ‘Zero Carbon’ Future

In the Paris accord, 197 countries agreed to the goal of holding global temperatures “well below” 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit it to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

More than 90 authors from 40 countries were involved in leading the report, helped by 133 contributing authors. (IANS)