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Worlds Day for Water: 5 water conservation ways that are ideal for Indian conditions

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By Ishan Kukreti

This day, 22 years ago, UN decided to recognize 22nd March as the ‘World Day for Water.’   On this day, all the UN members implemented water conservation as recommended by the UN.

According to UNWater, 783 million people do not have access to clean water. World water demand will rise up by 70% till 2050, while many places will see declining water availability. Water is a limited resource and has to be conserved for humanity to survive.

To celebrate the day, here is a list of innovative water conservative techniques which one, irrespective of their geography or profession, can make use of to save some nectar for life.

Rooftop rain water harvesting

It is the most conventional and widely used rainwater harvesting techniques. Rooftop rain harvesting is the easiest way to collect rain water for household purpose.

Building a catchment area is required to take the rainwater down into the underground tank through several filters. The harvested water can also be used to replenish ground level water.

Suitable for – Anyone who owns a house with a roof.

Cost – Rs. 10,000 – Rs. 30,000

Cycle run water pumps

In 1980 Nasiruddin Gayen, a small farmer from West Bengal conceptualized this unique invention. Instead of mechanical motors a cycle pump is used. The process not only reduces the cost of fuel but makes the person pump the amount that is required.

Paddling the cycle creates an up and down movement in the pump and this can release 100 liters of water per minutes

Suitable for – Small scale farmers, can also be used in urban settings

Cost – Less than Rs. 7000

Rainwater syringe

This method can be used to harvest rainwater in the coastal areas to dilute groundwater salinity where there is a problem of saline ground water.

Rainwater is collected from the roofs and is stored in a pressure tank. With the help of PVC pipes, the water is then transferred below the sea level of 16-24 ft. The water gets stored in the vertical groundwater column and can be used later with the help of a pump or motor.

Suitable for – Coastal areas

Cost – N.A

Joy Pumps

This is an absolutely fun filled way of conserving water. In this technique, under a merry-go-round or a see-saw, a conventional hand pump apparatus is fixed.

A tank (8-10 feet above ground level) is filled with ground water as the kids play on these rides.

This technique has been designed to cope with water scarcity problems in villages with no clear surface water source, electricity issues and high poverty.

Suitable for – Schools, parks, villages and relief camps.

Cost – N.A

Ferro-Cement Tanks

This is a cheap and durable method of rain water harvesting. All it requires to make a Ferro-cement tank is sand, cement, mild steel bar and galvanized iron wire mesh and semi-skilled laborers.

These tanks are light in weight and can last up to 25 years. The tanks can store up to 1000-2000 liters of water.

Suitable for – High rainfall regions

Cost- N.A

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Copyright 2015 NewsGram

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NASA’s Probe Discovers Signs Of Water on Asteroid Bennu

OSIRIS-REx will pass later this month just 1.2 miles (1.9 km) from Bennu, entering the asteroid's gravitational pull and analyzing its terrain.

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Asteroid
This Nov. 16, 2018, image provide by NASA shows the asteroid Bennu. NASA

NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft has discovered ingredients for water on a relatively nearby skyscraper-sized asteroid, a rocky acorn-shaped object that may hold clues to the origins of life on Earth, scientists said on Monday.

OSIRIS-REx, which flew last week within a scant 12 miles (19 km) of the asteroid Bennu some 1.4 million miles (2.25 million km) from Earth, found traces of hydrogen and oxygen molecules — part of the recipe for water and thus the potential for life — embedded in the asteroid’s rocky surface.

The probe, on a mission to return samples from the asteroid to Earth for study, was launched in 2016. Bennu, roughly a third of a mile wide (500 meters), orbits the sun at roughly the same distance as Earth. There is concern among scientists about the possibility of Bennu impacting Earth late in the 22nd century.

 

NASA, asteroid
NASA’s OSIRIS-REx. Flickr

 

“We have found the water-rich minerals from the early solar system, which is exactly the kind of sample we were going out there to find and ultimately bring back to Earth,” University of Arizona planetary scientist Dante Lauretta, the OSIRIS-REx mission’s principal investigator, said in a telephone interview.

Asteroids are among the leftover debris from the solar system’s formation some 4.5 billion years ago. Scientists believe asteroids and comets crashing into early Earth may have delivered organic compounds and water that seeded the planet for life, and atomic-level analysis of samples from Bennu could provide key evidence to support that hypothesis.

“When samples of this material are returned by the mission to Earth in 2023, scientists will receive a treasure trove of new information about the history and evolution of our solar system,” Amy Simon, a scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland, said in a statement.

OSIRIS-REx, NASA, Asteroid
This illustration provided by NASA depicts the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft at the asteroid Bennu. The rocky remnant from the dawn of the solar system may hold clues to the origins of life. VOA

“We’re really trying to understand the role that these carbon-rich asteroids played in delivering water to the early Earth and making it habitable,” Lauretta added.

OSIRIS-REx will pass later this month just 1.2 miles (1.9 km) from Bennu, entering the asteroid’s gravitational pull and analyzing its terrain. From there, the spacecraft will begin to gradually tighten its orbit around the asteroid, spiraling to within just 6 feet (2 meters) of its surface so its robot arm can snatch a sample of Bennu by July 2020.

Also Read: Wintertime Ice Growth in Arctic Sea Slows Long-Term Decline: NASA

The spacecraft will later fly back to Earth, jettisoning a capsule bearing the asteroid specimen for a parachute descent in the Utah desert in September 2023. (VOA)