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World’s richest 10 percent people produce 50 percent carbon emission: Oxfam

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New Delhi: The world’s richest 10 percent of the people are responsible for around 50 percent of global carbon emissions, said a study by Oxfam.

The report, titled ‘Extreme Carbon Inequality: Why the Paris Climate deal must put the poorest, lowest emitting and most vulnerable people first’, was released at a time when global leaders have met in Paris for the crucial UN Climate Change Conference.

“The poorest half of the global population are responsible for only around 10 percent of global emissions, yet live overwhelmingly in the countries most vulnerable to climate change – while the richest 10 percent of people are responsible for around 50 percent of global emissions,” the report said.

Climate change is “inextricably linked to economic inequality”, it said, adding that, “it is a crisis that is driven by the greenhouse gas emissions of the ‘haves’ that hits the ‘have-nots’ the hardest”.

“Governments in Paris need to stand up to their influence, and stand up for their citizens – the poorest, lowest emitting and most vulnerable among them first and foremost – if Paris is to deliver an agreement for those who need it most,” said the study that was released on Wednesday.

While CoP 21 in Paris will see a deal negotiated between governments on the basis of the total emissions produced in their territories, “the real winners and losers will be their citizens”, the study added.

Comparing the average lifestyle consumption footprints of richer and poorer citizens in a range of countries, the study says that “some emerging economies like China, India, Brazil and South Africa have high and rapidly rising emissions”.

The lifestyle consumption emissions of even these countries’ richest citizens remain some way behind that of their counterparts in rich OECD nations – an international economic organisation of 34 nations which includes US, Britain, Canada and others, it added.

The report proves India’s point that rich countries cannot put blame and responsibilities on developing countries. The renewable energy sources cannot be afforded by poor countries and poor people and this is why rich countries have to be more active.

(IANS)

Image: Huffingtonpost.com

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The Trump Administration Just Lost Another Court Battle To Kids

The activists, whose ages range from preteen to the early 20s, are seeking various environmental remedies. A trial is scheduled for Oct. 29 in the federal court in Eugene, Oregon

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FILE - The coal-fired Plant Scherer, one of the nation's top carbon dioxide emitters, stands in the distance in Juliette, Ga., June 3, 2017. The Trump administration intends to roll back the centerpiece of former President Barack Obama’s efforts to slow global warming, seeking to ease restrictions on greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fired power plants. Young activists are suing the government for ignoring climate change. VOA

A federal appeals court on Friday rejected the Trump administration’s renewed bid to dismiss a lawsuit by young activists who say it is ignoring the perils of climate change.

By a 3-0 vote, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco said the government fell short of the “high bar” needed to dismiss the Oregon case, originally brought in 2015 against the administration of President Barack Obama.

Twenty-one children and young adults accused federal officials and oil industry executives of violating their due process rights by knowing for decades that carbon pollution poisons the environment but doing nothing about it.

The government contended that letting the case proceed would be too burdensome, unconstitutionally pit the courts against the executive branch, and require improper “agency decision-making” by forcing officials to answer questions about climate change.

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Twenty-one children and young adults accused federal officials and oil industry executives of violating their due process rights by knowing for decades that carbon pollution poisons the environment but doing nothing about it. Pixabay

But the appeals court said the issues raised “are better addressed through the ordinary course of litigation.”

An earlier government bid to end the case failed in March.

The activists, whose ages range from preteen to the early 20s, are seeking various environmental remedies. A trial is scheduled for Oct. 29 in the federal court in Eugene, Oregon.

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Representatives of the U.S. Department of Justice did not immediately respond to requests for comment. A lawyer for the activists did not immediately respond to similar requests.

The case is U.S. et al v U.S. District Court for the District of Oregon, Eugene, 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. No. 18-71928. (VOA)