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World’s richest 10 percent people produce 50 percent carbon emission: Oxfam

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New Delhi: The world’s richest 10 percent of the people are responsible for around 50 percent of global carbon emissions, said a study by Oxfam.

The report, titled ‘Extreme Carbon Inequality: Why the Paris Climate deal must put the poorest, lowest emitting and most vulnerable people first’, was released at a time when global leaders have met in Paris for the crucial UN Climate Change Conference.

“The poorest half of the global population are responsible for only around 10 percent of global emissions, yet live overwhelmingly in the countries most vulnerable to climate change – while the richest 10 percent of people are responsible for around 50 percent of global emissions,” the report said.

Climate change is “inextricably linked to economic inequality”, it said, adding that, “it is a crisis that is driven by the greenhouse gas emissions of the ‘haves’ that hits the ‘have-nots’ the hardest”.

“Governments in Paris need to stand up to their influence, and stand up for their citizens – the poorest, lowest emitting and most vulnerable among them first and foremost – if Paris is to deliver an agreement for those who need it most,” said the study that was released on Wednesday.

While CoP 21 in Paris will see a deal negotiated between governments on the basis of the total emissions produced in their territories, “the real winners and losers will be their citizens”, the study added.

Comparing the average lifestyle consumption footprints of richer and poorer citizens in a range of countries, the study says that “some emerging economies like China, India, Brazil and South Africa have high and rapidly rising emissions”.

The lifestyle consumption emissions of even these countries’ richest citizens remain some way behind that of their counterparts in rich OECD nations – an international economic organisation of 34 nations which includes US, Britain, Canada and others, it added.

The report proves India’s point that rich countries cannot put blame and responsibilities on developing countries. The renewable energy sources cannot be afforded by poor countries and poor people and this is why rich countries have to be more active.

(IANS)

Image: Huffingtonpost.com

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Climate Change Affects Developing Countries the Most: UN

The African continent could leverage to its advantage in the global fight against the impacts of climate change

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Climate Change, Developing Countries
the least responsible countries suffer the most from the global threat that emanated from climate change. Pixabay

United Nations officials on Wednesday said developing nations were facing the brunt of climate change despite their little contribution to the problem.

A joint statement was made by Mary Robinson, Ireland’s former President and UN Special Envoy on El Nino and Climate, and Executive Secretary of the UN Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) Vera Songwe during a climate-focused meeting in Addis Ababa, the Ethiopian capital.

Robinson said, “those who suffer the worst effects of climate change are often the least responsible for it”.

She called for the need for climate justice as the least responsible countries suffer the most from the global threat that emanated from climate change, Xinhua news agency reported.

Climate Change, Developing Countries
Developing nations were facing the brunt of climate change despite their little contribution to the problem. Pixabay

Robinson was appointed UN Special Envoy along with Macharia Kamau of Kenya in 2016 to provide the leadership required to tackle climate-related challenges.

ECA’s Songwe said the African continent could leverage to its advantage in the global fight against the impacts of climate change.

“We didn’t create it, but we can profit the most from it. A climate smart economy is an extremely profitable economy. It’s an economy that will create more jobs and leave us cleaner and better,” Songwe said.

Mithika Mwenda, Executive Director of the Pan African Justice Alliance, said during the discussion climate justice was not getting the priority it deserved from governments.

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“Africa is most affected and impacted by climate change, but we don’t do much about it. We need strong governance systems to move the climate discourse and actions forward,” he said.

He urged the ECA to fortify collaboration with the African Union and the African Development Bank in line with the ClimDev-Africa programme that’s mandated by African leaders to create a solid foundation for Africa’s response to climate change. (IANS)