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Yemen humanitarian crisis: U.S. Remains Apathetic to worsening calamity

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Yemen up in smoke
By Henry Stillwell

In spite of the overthrow of President Abd Rabbuh Mansur Haddi, who claimed an end to the civil War in Yemen almost five months ago, civilian casualties have continued to escalate in the poorest nation in the Middle-East.

Doctors Without Borders has reported that 65 civilians have died in a Saudi led air strike targeting Houthi rebels on Saturday, including 17 children. UNICEF has reported that an average of eight children per day are being killed or maimed in Yemen today. The densely populated city of Taiz has been the target of the most recent air strikes that have killed dozens of civilians.
UNICEF reports that 398 children have been killed in air strikes since war erupted in March, and an additional 1.3 million have been displaced from their homes.
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Civilians killed, houses pummelled
In addition to the alarming rate of civilian casualties, now an approximate 45 per cent of Yemeni citizens do not have reliable access to safe drinking water. UNICEF also reports that 10 million are in need of humanitarian Aid, vis-a-vis food, water, and vital medical supplies.
However the Saudi-led and US backed coalitions have not allowed the delivery of humanitarian aid, despite pleas from Iran, Yemeni civilians, and several international human rights groups.
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A Saudi troop walks past a ravaged Yemeni town
Considering the horrifying conditions on the ground in Yemen, where has the Nobel Peace Prize winning President Barack Obama stood on the crisis in Yemen?  Rather than facilitate peace negotiations, rather than demand an immediate ceasefire, or allow for the delivery of vital humanitarian aid, Obama has used the crisis to again point fingers at Iran. 
In a recent letter to congress, Obama mentioned Yemen as an aside, vowing not to allow Iran to destabilize Yemen by sending aid and weapons to Houthi fighters; a claim many have made and few have proven.
However, it is not Obama alone who has failed to spare the civilians of the sovereign nation of Yemen from famine and war.  The UN has been a passive player in the conflict from the beginning.  Israel, and other US allies have sat in silence as well, rather than jeopardize good relations with the world’s greatest superpower.  
At some point, the “don’t’ ask don’t tell” stance on this Humanitarian crisis must end, so that the children of Yemen can have access to food, water, and proper medical care, and ultimately the United States has to bear the torch.
The United States has backed the Saudi Led coalition from the beginning as Saudi dominance of the Arabian Peninsula facilitates an ideal situation for US oil interests.  Yet at some point, human lives have to trump geo-politics.
The United States must allow for the delivery of humanitarian aid in Yemen, or else the people of Yemen will face continually worsening conditions.
NewsGram has covered the humanitarian crisis in Yemen extensively. For an in-depth analysis of the gravity of the crisis in Yemen, here is a link.
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Video- USA Gears Up For Its Midterm Elections

Trump and Obama may never appear as opposing candidates on a ballot together, but they are facing off in a closely watched proxy battle in this year’s midterm campaign.

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MIdterm Elections
Former U.S. President Barack Obama speaks at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in Urbana, Illinois. VOA

For former U.S. president Barack Obama, it must seem like old times. Obama has started to hit the campaign trail on behalf of Democrats ahead of the November midterm elections, setting up what amounts to a proxy battle with the man who succeeded him, President Donald Trump.

Trump already has been a fixture on the campaign trail on behalf of Republicans, convinced that aggressive efforts in Republican-leaning states will protect Republican majorities in both the Senate and the House of Representatives.

Obama’s initial foray into the 2018 congressional campaign came at the University of Illinois where he urged young Democrats to keep up the fight for social and economic justice.

“Each time we have gotten closer to those ideals, somebody somewhere has pushed back,” Obama said. “It did not start with Donald Trump. He is a symptom, not the cause. He is just capitalizing on resentment that politicians have been fanning for years.”

Get out the vote

Obama also campaigned in California on behalf of several Democratic House candidates, where he urged activists to turn out and vote in November.

“When we are not participating, when we are not paying attention, when we are not stepping up, other voices fill the void,” Obama told a Democratic gathering in Anaheim. “But the good news in two months, we have a chance to restore some sanity in our politics.”

Obama now finds himself competing against the man who succeeded him, President Trump, and who has vowed to undo much of what Obama did during his presidency.

Midterm Elections
Former U.S. President Barack Obama speaks at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in Urbana, Illinois. VOA

Touting the economy

For his part, Trump has been eager to get out on the campaign trail and has promised a vigorous effort to energize Republican voters to keep their congressional majorities in November.

“This election is about jobs. It is safety and it is jobs,” Trump said at a recent Republican rally in Billings, Montana. “Thanks to Republican leadership, our economy is booming like never before in our history. Think of it, in our history. Nobody knew this was going to happen.”

Trump also is stoking fear among his Republican supporters that a Democratic takeover of the House of Representatives in November could lead to his impeachment.

“We will worry about that if it ever happens,” he told the crowd in Billings. “But if it does happen, it is your fault because you did not go out to vote. OK? You didn’t go out to vote.”

Midterm Elections
Supporters hold signs as President Donald Trump speaks during a rally Aug. 21, 2018, in Charleston, W.Va. VOA

Referendum on Trump

Midterm elections are historically unkind to sitting presidents. But unlike many of his predecessors, Trump has embraced the notion that the November congressional vote will be a referendum on his presidency.

Political analysts said that strategy carries both risk and reward.

“The enthusiasm on both sides of the aisle is really related to the president,” said George Washington University political scientist Lara Brown. “I think the last numbers I saw were that more than 40 percent of people who said that they would be very likely to vote were going to be either voting for the president or against the president in this midterm.”

Trump and Obama already have jousted over who should get credit for the strong U.S. economy. At his rallies, Trump touts economic growth and job creation numbers since he took over the presidency, arguing that the national economy is “booming like never before.”

Obama has offered some pushback on the campaign trail.

Midterm Elections
President Donald Trump speaks at a fundraiser in Fargo, N.D. VOA

“Let’s just remember when this recovery started,” Obama said in his Illinois speech, highlighting job growth during his White House years as part of the recovery from the 2008 recession.

Head-to-head battle

Like Trump, Obama also has proved to be a lightning rod for voters. The 44th president was effective in two presidential campaigns at turning out Democrats but was a drag on the party in his two midterm elections, spurring Republicans to turn out against him.

During this year’s midterm, Obama is likely to focus on mobilizing women, younger activists and nonwhite voters, key parts of the Democratic coalition that helped him win the White House in 2008 and 2012.

Also Read: Trump Needs Obama For Dealing With North Korea, Said Jon Wolfsthal

“That enthusiasm is there throughout the Democratic Party and across demographic groups,” said Brookings Institution scholar John Hudak. “And for the first time many voters are going to see options on their ballot that look and sound and talk about issues in different ways, and that is always something that is appealing to a voter base.”

Trump and Obama may never appear as opposing candidates on a ballot together, but they are facing off in a closely watched proxy battle in this year’s midterm campaign where party control of Congress is at stake. (VOA)