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Young Dairy Farmers from Rajasthan’s Kota City sell Cow Dung Cakes online on Amazon

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Jaipur, May 7, 2017: Three young entrepreneurs from Rajasthan’s Kota city — otherwise known as an education hub — have taken their 15-year-old dairy farming family business to the next level and are now selling cow dung cakes on e-tailing site Amazon.

“We found potential in this business. For the last three months, we have been selling cow dung cakes on Amazon,” Amanpreet Singh, one of the three directors of APEI Organic Foods, said.

These cakes, about the size of a quarter-plate, are priced at Rs 120 per dozen. They currently have an average sale of 15 consignments — each of 500-1,000 cakes — per week.

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“We are getting a good response, mainly from Mumbai, Delhi and Pune,” Singh said.

The product is packaged in such a way that the cakes don’t break.

For starters, the dung, which is a semi-liquid mixture, is first dried. It is then put into a circular die which goes through a heat-shrinking process. The finished product is then packed in cardboard boxes and dispatched.

Singh stated that the idea of reaching out to buyers online came due to the demand from Tier-I cities, where there is lack of any livestock management and dairies. “People basically want it for religious purposes in these cities,” Singh added.

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The company’s livestock farm is spread over 40 acres near Kota and has 120 cows. It is equipped with modern infrastructure, effective connectivity, skilled manpower and other amenities.

The family-owned organic dairy milk brand is aptly titled “GAU” — meaning cow — but has been derived from the initials of the three directors, Gagandeep Singh, Amanpreet Singh and Uttamjyot Singh.

The promoters are likely to be in great demand at the forthcoming Global Rajasthan Agritech Meet (GRAM) being held in Kota from May 24 to 26.

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Singh said that the fodder for the cows is grown organically in a healthy and well-nurtured environment. Waste from the dairy farm is utilised to produce electricity, gas, vermicompost and cowdung cakes.

The company has installed radio-frequency identification (RFID) on the livestock which helps them track the health and nutrition of the cattle from anywhere across the world.

The director claimed that this dairy farm also has Rajasthan’s first biogas plant that generates electricity. This is the only source of electricity at the farm, producing 40 KW per day. This saves around Rs 24 lakh annually, he added. (IANS)

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Facebook clarifies how it collects data when you’re logged out

Facebook is embroiled in a widening scandal that a British data firm called Cambridge Analytica improperly gathered detailed information on its 87 million users

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Facebook was accused of leaking data to Cambridge Analytica earlier this year.

After Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified in front of the US Congress last week, the company on Tuesday tried to clarify on questions how it collects data when people are not directly using the website or app.

Many websites and apps use Facebook services to make their content and ads more engaging and relevant.

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The social media app is in news for all the wrong reasons lately. VOA

“Apps and websites that use our services, such as the Like button or Facebook Analytics, send us information to make their content and ads better,” David Baser, Product Management Director at Facebook, wrote in a blog post.

In return for that information, Facebook helps those websites serve up relevant ads or receive analytics that help them understand how people use their services.

“When you visit a site or app that uses our services, we receive information even if you’re logged out or don’t have a Facebook account. This is because other apps and sites don’t know who is using Facebook,” Baser added.

Many companies offer these types of services and, like Facebook, they also get information from the apps and sites that use them.

“Twitter, Pinterest and LinkedIn all have similar Like and Share buttons to help people share things on their services. Google has a popular analytics service. And Amazon, Google and Twitter all offer login features,” Facebook said.

These companies — and many others — also offer advertising services. When you visit a website, your browser (for example Chrome, Safari or Firefox) sends a request to the site’s server. The browser shares your IP address so the website knows where on the Internet to send the site content.

The website also gets information about the browser and operating system (for example Android or Windows) you’re using because not all browsers and devices support the same features.

Also Read: Google Home To Be Your Best Friend Now

“It also gets cookies, which are identifiers that websites use to know if you’ve visited before. This can help with things like saving items in your shopping cart,” Facebook explained. “So when a website uses one of our services, your browser sends the same kind of information to Facebook as the website receives. We also get information about which website or app you’re using, which is necessary to know when to provide our tools,” Baser noted.

There are three main ways in which Facebook uses the information it gets from other websites and apps.

“Providing our services to these sites or apps; improving safety and security on Facebook; and enhancing our own products and services,” Baser said.

“We also use the information we receive from websites and apps to help protect the security of Facebook. For example, receiving data about the sites a particular browser has visited can help us identify bad actors,” he posted.

Facebook one of the most popular apps in US. Pixabay
Facebook needs to fix itself. Pixabay

Zuckerberg, appearing before the US Congress last week, told the lawmakers that his own personal data was part of 87 million users’ that was “improperly shared” with British political consultancy firm Cambridge Analytica.

“We don’t sell the data. We use the data that people put into the system in order to make them more relevant. I believe people own their content,” he told the US Congress.

Facebook is embroiled in a widening scandal that a British data firm called Cambridge Analytica improperly gathered detailed information on its 87 million users. IANS