Monday March 18, 2019
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YouTube Projects The Earth To Be Flat

According to Asheley Landrum, who led the research at Texas Tech University, identified the prime driver for the startling rise in the number of Flat-believers.

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Meanwhile, Google has acknowledged there's more it can do to combat the spread of false information on YouTube. In January, it outlined new plans designed to push back the false belief, according to the CNET. Pixabay

In a major goof-up, popular video-sharing platform YouTube projected it upon impressionable minds that — the Earth is flat — raising the number of people who now seriously believe the planet to be a flat unending stretch of land, a study said.

The fact which is to the contrary was proved almost five centuries back, when Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan famously circumnavigated the Earth from 1519-1522, which would have been impossible if it had had an edge.

However, Google-owned YouTube is now contributing to people believing the Earth is round.

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The fact which is to the contrary was proved almost five centuries back, when Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan famously circumnavigated the Earth from 1519-1522, which would have been impossible if it had had an edge. Pixabay

“Their suspicion was raised when they attended the world’s largest gatherings of ‘Flat Earthers’ at the movement’s annual conference in Rayleigh, North Carolina, in 2017, and then in Denver, Colorado, last year,” The Guardian reported late on Sunday.

According to Asheley Landrum, who led the research at Texas Tech University, identified the prime driver for the startling rise in the number of Flat-believers.

A poll conducted by London-based market research company YouGov in 2018 found only two-thirds of young people surveyed, “firmly believed” that the Earth was round.

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However, Google-owned YouTube is now contributing to people believing the Earth is round. Pixababy

“Of the 30 people, one said they had not considered the Earth to be flat two years ago but changed their minds after watching videos promoting conspiracy theories on YouTube,” Landrum was quoted as saying by The Guardian.

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Meanwhile, Google has acknowledged there’s more it can do to combat the spread of false information on YouTube. In January, it outlined new plans designed to push back the false belief, according to the CNET.

The YouTube team in a blog post said: “We’ll begin reducing recommendations of borderline content and content that could misinform users in harmful ways — such as videos promoting a phony miracle cure for a serious illness, claiming the earth is flat, or making blatantly false claims about historic events like 9/11.” (IANS)

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To Avoid Copyright Violations Youtubers Try Funny Ways to Make Videos

There has not been any comment on the subject from Google or YouTube as of now

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Recently, several YouTubers have landed in copyright violations by picking up short clips from platforms like TikTok that contained music from labels like Sony and Warner. Pixabay

In an attempt to combat copyright-related issues on YouTube, creators have started adding self-sung songs behind funny clips they wish to shoot a reaction video on.

Reaction videos, typically monetised, are a huge part of the current YouTube culture where people lift clips and trailers and film their reactions to what is happening on-screen.

Recently, several YouTubers have landed in copyright violations by picking up short clips from platforms like TikTok that contained music from labels like Sony and Warner.

“To work around that, creators like Danny Gonzalez and Kurtis Conner have started replacing the music with their own singing, half-heartedly singing famous songs while the corresponding TikTok video plays on screen,” The Verge reported on Sunday.

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Reaction videos, typically monetised, are a huge part of the current YouTube culture where people lift clips and trailers and film their reactions to what is happening on-screen. Pixabay

Creators have devised the humorous method so that major labels would not be able to claim copyright infringement, or at least that the singing would not trigger YouTube’s automated system for finding copyrighted content.

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However, the issue remains that YouTube content creators are still trying out ways to monetise videos that include content they did not create themselves.

“It’s a little painful to hear, but ultimately a very fun loophole in the copyright system that YouTube has to enforce,” the report added.

There has not been any comment on the subject from Google or YouTube as of now.  (IANS)