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Over 90,000 YouTube Videos Violated Terror Policy, Claims Google

90,000 YouTube videos violated terror policy: Google

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Rumors suggest that Google may unveil a mid-range Pixel phone as a cheaper option to the flagship model currently on sale for $800. VOA

In a bid to crackdown on terror-related content, Google said it has reviewed more than one million suspected terrorist videos on YouTube in the first quarter of 2019 and found 90,000 of such videos violated the company’s terrorism policy.

In a letter sent to the US House Committee on Homeland Security, Google said it spends “hundreds of millions of dollars annually” on reviewing content, CNET reported on Thursday. The House panel, however, observed that tech companies have failed to provide requested information on fighting terrorist content while Facebook did not respond.

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FILE – Signage is seen inside the YouTube Space LA offices in Los Angeles, California, Oct. 21, 2015. VOA

“The fact that some of the largest corporations in the world are unable to tell us what they are specifically doing to stop terrorist and extremist content is not acceptable,” said the panel. “As we saw in New Zealand, Facebook failed and admitted as much,” it added in a statement. With these platforms becoming more and more ubiquitous in peoples’ lives, these companies have an obligation to Americans to ensure – and prove – they are doing everything possible to stop the spread of this vile content, the panel argued.

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In a separate letter to the US panel, Twitter said putting a dollar amount on efforts to combat terrorism is a “complex request”. “We have now suspended more than 1.4 million accounts for violations related to the promotion of terrorism between August 1, 2015, and June 30, 2018,” added Carlos Monje Jr., Twitter’s director of public policy and philanthropy. (IANS)

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Google AI Can Now Predict Lung Cancer Accurately

The research was published in the journal Nature Medicine

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A Google logo is displayed at the entrance to the internet based company's offices in Toronto. VOA

A team of Google researchers has used a deep-learning algorithm to detect lung cancer accurately from computed scans.

The work demonstrates the potential for Artificial Intelligence (AI) to increase both accuracy and consistency, which could help accelerate adoption of lung cancer screening worldwide.

Lung cancer is the deadliest of all cancers worldwide — more than breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers combined — and it’s the sixth most common cause of death globally, according to the World Health Organization.

“Using advances in 3D volumetric modeling alongside datasets from our partners (including Northwestern University), we’ve made progress in modeling lung cancer prediction as well as laying the groundwork for future clinical testing,” Shravya Shetty, M.S. Technical Lead at Google explained in a blog post late Monday.

Google researchers created a model that can not only generate the overall lung cancer malignancy prediction (viewed in 3D volume) but also identify subtle malignant tissue in the lungs (lung nodules).

Google on an Android device. Pixabay

In the research, Google AI leveraged 45,856 de-identified chest CT screening cases (some in which cancer was found).

“When using a single CT scan for diagnosis, our model performed on par or better than the six radiologists. We detected five per cent more cancer cases while reducing false-positive exams by more than 11 per cent compared to unassisted radiologists in our study,” said Google.

For an asymptomatic patient with no history of cancer, the AI system reviewed and detected potential lung cancer that had been previously called normal.

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These initial results are encouraging, but further studies will assess the impact and utility in clinical practice, said Google.

The research was published in the journal Nature Medicine. (IANS)