Sunday May 20, 2018

Zen Scholar Unno showcases History and Practice of Buddhism

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Courtesy: Wisdom Publications
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Hawai’i, March 18, 2017: Author and Zen scholar Dr Mark Unno will come back to Hawai‘i Island for a presentation on Buddhist history. He will also conduct a guided meditation at the Kohala Hongwanji on Sunday, March 19, at 2 p.m. The general public regardless of faith or background, is welcome to attend the free event.

Dr. Unno will unveil two forms of mindfulness practice originating from the Buddhas, Syakamuni (the commonly-known historical figure) and Amida Buddha (the symbolic, universal Buddha).

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During his presentation, Unno will speak about the history of Buddhism and the formation of numerous practices of mindfulness, as well as the Shin Buddhist path of Namu Amida Butsu–a widespread form of nembutsu–which aims to proliferate a state of conscience and compassion.

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Unno’s research underscored on Classical Japanese Buddhism with an emphasis on Zen and Pure Land Buddhism. He is Associate Professor of Japanese Buddhism in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Oregon. He teaches courses on Asian Religions, Classical Japanese Buddhism and Comparative Religion. Unno is also the author of Shingon Refractions: Myoe and the Mantra of Light (2004). He is the editor of Buddhism and Psychotherapy Across Cultures (2006), and is a regular contributor to Buddhist journals like Tricycle and Buddhadharma: The Practitioner’s Quarterly.

– prepared by Sabhyata Badhwar of NewsGram. Twitter: @SabbyDarkhorse

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Hawaii Could Face Volcanic Smog, Acid Rain

An influx of groundwater could interact with the lava and create steam explosions, it added

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Hawaii Could Face Volcanic Smog, Acid Rain
Hawaii Could Face Volcanic Smog, Acid Rain. Pixabay

Following the eruption of the Kilauea volcano, residents of Hawaii’s Big Island will now have to deal with steam-driven explosions, hazardous volcanic smog and acid rain, the US Geological Survey (USGS) has warned.

The USGS’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory on Wednesday warned of possible explosive eruptions in the coming weeks because as the lava continues to sink in a lake inside a Kilauea crater, reports CNN.

An influx of groundwater could interact with the lava and create steam explosions, it added.

Those forces would emit “ballistic projectiles” — as small as pebbles or weighing up to several tonnes.

The USGS also said ash clouds would rise to greater elevations, dispensing ash over wider areas.

“At this time, we cannot say with certainty that explosive activity will occur, how large the explosions could be, or how long such explosive activity could continue,” an advisory said.

Representational image.
Representational image. Wikimedia Commons

Governor David Ige has asked President Donald Trump to issue a disaster declaration for Hawaii as a result of the ongoing earthquakes and volcano eruption, according to a press release.

The declaration allows federal funds to begin to flow to state and local efforts in Hawaii.

The estimated cost to protect residents over the next 30 days is expected to exceed $2.9 million, according to the governor’s office.

A brief explosion on Wednesday on a Kilauea crater was the result of falling rocks and not the interaction of lava with the water table, the USGS said.

Also Read: Earthquake Then Volcano, There is No Relief For the Hawaii Residents

The Kilauea eruption last week created new volcanic vents on the ground miles east of the summit, releasing slow-moving lava and toxic gas into island communities.

Officials have warned of dangerous levels of sulphur dioxide gas, CNN reported.

Following the eruption on May 1, 1,700 residents were asked to evacuate. At least 36 structures — including 26 residences — have been destroyed since then.

Residents were being allowed to check on their properties from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. each day but must be prepared to leave at a moment’s notice, the Hawaii County Civil Defence Agency says. (IANS)

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