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Meet Ayesha Aziz: India’s Youngest Women Pilot

The girl of kashmir-origin got the licence as a pilot when she was just 16

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Ayesha Aziz Image Source: Mashable

Passion and the spirit to do something unconventional are the only dynamic forces for women in this male dominated industry. Ever since she was a child, she knew about her passion and dreams to be fulfilled and she achieved her goals within a short span of time.

She got the student pilot licence when she was just 16. Ayesha, now 20, has not only succeeded in fulfilling her childhood dreams but also became the youngest pilot of India. Focus, consistency, hard work and confidence play key role in achieving something like this.

The keenness in flights grew in her when she along with her parents would fly to their native place, Kashmir, about twice of thrice a year. She used to enjoy the landings and the take-offs while her brother would sleep out of fear.

During her inspiring career, Ayesha also got the chance to visit NASA and meet John McBride. But her happiness had no limits when she met her greatest inspiration Sunita Williams which probably was the best moment of her life.

Youngest Pilot Of India Image Source: Jansatta
Youngest Pilot Of India Image Source: Jansatta

After completing her Class X, she joined the flying school and cleared the five viva sessions. Although, she got her student licence as a pilot in November 2013 immediately after she turned 16 but due to some monetary constrains, her training for commercial pilot licence got delayed. Currently she flies single engine Cessna 152 and Cessna172.

Aziz is currently pursuing her BSc third year in Aviation at Bombay Flying Club in Mumbai. After completing her BSc, she would get her commercial pilot license for which she needs to complete 80 hours of the total 200 hours of flight.

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Unlike the parents who prefer their girls to learn cooking and behave according to the worthless set of conventions laid by the society, Ayesha’s parents always supported her and encouraged her to achieve her goals and that’s the reason why Ayesha believes that she is lucky to have them as her parents and their motivation played a key role in her success.

This young inspiration has also worked in a commercial advertisement for whisper and done multiple photoshoots for a magazine. She created a history and became an inspiration for all those women who are not able to surpass the male dominating society.

Prepared by Pashchiema with inputs from India Today. Twitter: @pashchiema

  • Akanksha Sharma

    Wow, she got her student pilot licence at such tender age .

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Vikram Lander Spotted On Moon

The Vikram moonlander was sent by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) aboard the Chandraayan 2 that orbited the moon

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India’s Vikram lunar lander
India’s Vikram lunar lander, which crashed on its final approach to the Moon’s surface in September, has been found. Pixabay

BY ARUL LOUIS 

Shanmuga Subramanian, the eagle-eyed citizen space scientist who found Vikram moonlander said on Tuesday that he took spotting it as a challenge when NASA couldn’t.

He said in an email interview to IANS: “It was something challenging as even NASA can’t find out so why can’t we try out? And that’s the thought that led me to search for Vikram lander.”

Subramanian, who works as an information technology architect, in his spare time looked through the images taken by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) camera on September 17 and spotted a debris from Vikram.

Those images were taken when the light during moon’s dusk was very harsh at the place where the moonlander crashed and the long shadows made the hunt for Vikram difficult, NASA and LRO said at that time.

LRO Project Scientist Noah Petro, to whom Subramanian emailed his finding, told IANS: “The story of this really amazing individual (who) found it, helped us find it, is really awesome.”

The Vikram moonlander was sent by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) aboard the Chandraayan 2 that orbited the moon.

Vikram was launched from Chandrayaan on September 6 in hopes of making a safelanding and exploring the moon’s surface. However, it lost contact with ISRO minutes before the scheduled landing and crashed.

Vikram Moon Lander
A Moon landing is the arrival of a spacecraft on the surface of the Moon. Pixabay

Petro said: “This is the wonderful thing about our data. We released it for the world and anyone can use and he used it to make this discovery.”

Subramanian suggested a crowd-sourced citizen scientist movement to help space organisations.

“LRO’s data is a treasure trove. I would suggest students and others to help out NASA, ISRO and other space organisations by building a good database of LRO images with features like comparison etc.,” Subramanian told IANS.

“Currently we have to compare it manually (and I) wish someone can do more on that, with NASA’s scientists time crunched for their Moon missions,” he added.

Asked how he got interested, Subramanian said: “Space exploration is nothing new for me as I have been interested in space right from the scratch and watched ISRO’s rocket launches closely even managed to capture some of it on my YouTube channel.

“I don’t think Vikram lander would have made a such impact on the minds of the Indian public if it had landed successfully (but) since it was lost there was a lot of discussion in public forums as well as on my Facebook regarding what malfunctioned etc.

“The crash landing of Vikram made more people interested in it and it also got eventually hooked me, which lead to me searching NASA’s pic for nearly some 4-5 hours every night.”

Subramanian spoke of the social media world of space enthusiasts where intense discussions were taking place about the mystery of Vikram and which helped his quest.

“Initially there was lot of false positives I got (that were) corrected by Twitterati and one of the tweets led to me a Reddit forum where they had the exact intended landing location and the path of Vikram,” he said.

Vikram on moon
The Moon is an astronomical body that orbits the Earth as its only permanent natural satellite. Pixabay

On being able to narrow down the area for his search, he said: “Though there was no data available about the path of Vikram lander, I eventually concluded it would have come from North Pole as one of the tweets from ‘cgbassa’ said Vikram has crossed the North Pole of the moon. And from ISRO’s live images, I made out it would have stopped short of around 1 km from the landing spot so it eventually led to me searching around 2 sq km around the landing area.”

That tweet was from CG Bassa, an astronomer with Astron, the Dutch radio astronomy institute.

ALSO READ: Nations and their Moon Missions

After better pictures came from the LRO’s pass over the area in October and on November 11, when the light conditions improved, the LRO camera team scoured the area surrounding the spot where Subramanian had spotted a debris and found the impact spot of Vikram’s crash and other debris, the ASU said.

The impact site is located at 70.8810AoS, 22.7840AoE, at an elevation of 834 metres, it added. (IANS)