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10 Women Rights that every women should be privy to

Rights to swear by for lifetime of a woman

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Highlights

  • A woman is accused of being wrong when she approaches any form of law and order
  • Women Rights will help women to take a stance and fight against the crime

Feb 27, 2017: There are no second thoughts to it that we live in a patriarchal society, a society where women are condemned, critically abused, and controlled by men. While men do not take any responsibility of a woman next to her, it becomes requisite for a woman to take a firm stance for herself. Crimes occur every second of the minute and no woman is considered safe in India. However, there have been some laws that do away with women harassment. But laws merely do not suffice unless there is an awareness about it. And so to help women of the country face up to challenges posed by the society, we make an effort to help you retain some of the paramount laws that every woman should know.

  1. Right to privacy

Under section 164 of the Criminal Procedure Code, the cops will have to give the privacy to the victim without exposing her in front of the public. A woman who has been sexually assaulted has a right to record her statement in private without being overheard by anyone else. She can also record her statement with a lady constable or a police officer in personal. Privacy establishes a sense of freedom to be oneself without a fear of getting judged and gain access to one’s body without feeling uncovered.

2. Right to Equality

Under Article 15(1), the state shall not discriminate against any citizen of India on the ground of sex. In addition to it, there shouldn’t be any discrimination on the grounds of sex when it comes to salary as according to the provisions of Equal Remuneration Act.

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3. Right against Dowry

Dowry prohibition act of 1961 is one of the most talked about rights of a woman. And is still a prevalent issue our society is grappling with. As per this right, the bride can file a case against her in-laws for coercing her to give dowry.

4. Right against Sexual Harassment at workplace

The Sexual Harassment of Women at Workplace (Prevention, Prohibition, and Redressal) Act (2013) provides protection to women from sexual harassment at all workplaces. As per this act, any organization that has over 10 employees must have a sexual harassment committee. This act vividly specifies that criticizing, insulting, rebuking or condemning a female employee in front of other employees also acclaim to sexual harassment.

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5.  Right against indecent Representation of Women

This Act forbids indecent representation of women through any print media or a visual media.

6. Right against Domestic Violence

A domestic abuse could be anything from tormenting mentally to bruising physically. The right gives protection against Domestic abuse of any kind to a married woman, women in live-in relationships and a woman living in joint family.

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7. Right to discontinue pregnancy

The right allows women to terminate pregnancy after consulting with medical practitioners on moral grounds under Pre-Conception and Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques (PCPNDT) Act of 1994

8. Right to Divorce

The Indian Divorce Act of 1969 allows the cessation of marriage through mutual consent of both the partners. Courts are established to file, hear, and dispose of such cases.

9. Right to virtual complaints

As stated by this right a woman has the prerogative of lodging a complaint via email or registered post. A woman can send a verbal complaint through an email or post addressed to Commissioner of Police, if for some unavoidable circumstance she could not go to the police station. The police can then come over to the residence of the victim to take her statement.

10. Right to no arrest

A woman cannot be arrested after sunset and before sunrise. There have been many cases of women being harassed by the police in dark time hours and thus this exercise is avoided now. However, in matters of grave concern, a letter signed by the magistrate is required explaining the urgency of the arrest.


Obtain power and by all means, power is a law of man – make it yours.

-prepared by Naina Mishra. Twitter-@Nainamishr94

 

 

 

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Women Hit Especially Hard In Congo’s Worst Ebola Outbreak

For the afflicted, the road to recovery is long and lonely.

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Ebola, WHO, UNICEF, congo, Uganda, women
Congolese health workers register people and take their temperatures before they are vaccinated against Ebola in the village of Mangina in North Kivu province of the Democratic Republic of Congo. VOA

The Democratic Republic of Congo is in the throes of its worst-ever Ebola outbreak, with more than 420 cases in the country’s volatile east, and a mortality rate of just under 60 percent. But this outbreak — the nation’s tenth known Ebola epidemic — is unusual because more than 60 percent of patients are women.

Among them is Baby Benedicte. Her short life has already been unimaginably difficult.

At one month old, she is underweight, at 2.9 kilograms. And she is alone. Her mother had Ebola, and died giving birth to her. She’s spent the last three weeks of her life in a plastic isolation cube, cut off from most human contact. She developed a fever at eight days old and was transferred to this hospital in Beni, a town of some half-million people in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo.

More than 400 people have been diagnosed with Ebola here since the beginning of August, and more than half of them have died in a nation the size of Western Europe that struggles with insecurity and a lack of the most basic infrastructure and services. That makes this the second-worst Ebola outbreak in history, after the hemorrhagic fever killed more than 11,000 people in West Africa between 2013 and 2016.

This is 10th outbreak to strike the vast country since 1976, when Ebola was first identified in Congo. And this particular outbreak is further complicated by a simmering civil conflict that has plagued this region for more than two decades.

Guido Cornale, UNICEF’s coordinator in the region, says the scope of this outbreak is clear.

“It has become the worst outbreak in Congo, this is not a mystery,” he said.

What is mysterious, however, is the demographics of this outbreak. This time, more than 60 percent of cases are women, says the government’s regional health coordinator, Ndjoloko Tambwe Bathe.

“All the analyses show that this epidemic is feminized. Figures like this are alarming. It’s true that the female cases are more numerous than the male cases,” he said.

Congo, Uganda, ebola, Women
Health workers walk with a boy suspected of having been infected with the Ebola virus, at an Ebola treatment center in Beni, near Congo’s border with Uganda. VOA

Bathe declined to predict when the outbreak might end, though international officials have said it may last another six months. Epidemiologists are still studying why this epidemic is so skewed toward women and children, Cornale said.

“So now we can only guess. And one of the guesses is that woman are the caretakers of sick people at home. So if a family member got sick, who is taking care of him or her? Normally, a woman,” he said.

Or a nurse. Many of those affected are health workers, who are on the front line of battling this epidemic. Nurse Guilaine Mulindwa Masika, spent 16 days in care after a patient transmitted the virus to her. She says it was the fight of her life.

“The pain was enormous, the pain was constant,” she said. “The headache, the diarrhea, the vomiting, and the weakness — it was very, very bad.”

Congo, Ebola, Women
Marie-Roseline Darnycka Belizaire, World Health Organization (WHO) Epidemiology Team Lead, talks to women as part of Ebola contact tracing, in Mangina, Democratic Republic of Congo. VOA

For the afflicted, the road to recovery is long and lonely. Masika and her cured colleagues face weeks of leave from work to ensure the risk of infection is gone. In the main hospital in the city of Beni, families who have recovered live together in a large white tent, kept four meters from human contact by a bright orange plastic cordon. They yell hello at their caretakers, who must don protective gear if they want to get any closer.

And for Baby Benedicte, who is tended to constantly by a nurse covered head to toe in protective gear, the future is uncertain. Medical workers aren’t entirely sure where her father is, or if he is going to come for her.

Also Read: Congo Start Trials For Drugs Against Ebola

She sleeps most of the day, the nurse says, untroubled by the goings-on around her. Meanwhile, the death toll rises. (VOA)