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10 Women Rights that every women should be privy to

Rights to swear by for lifetime of a woman

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Representational Image, Credits- Pixabay

Highlights

  • A woman is accused of being wrong when she approaches any form of law and order
  • Women Rights will help women to take a stance and fight against the crime

Feb 27, 2017: There are no second thoughts to it that we live in a patriarchal society, a society where women are condemned, critically abused, and controlled by men. While men do not take any responsibility of a woman next to her, it becomes requisite for a woman to take a firm stance for herself. Crimes occur every second of the minute and no woman is considered safe in India. However, there have been some laws that do away with women harassment. But laws merely do not suffice unless there is an awareness about it. And so to help women of the country face up to challenges posed by the society, we make an effort to help you retain some of the paramount laws that every woman should know.

  1. Right to privacy

Under section 164 of the Criminal Procedure Code, the cops will have to give the privacy to the victim without exposing her in front of the public. A woman who has been sexually assaulted has a right to record her statement in private without being overheard by anyone else. She can also record her statement with a lady constable or a police officer in personal. Privacy establishes a sense of freedom to be oneself without a fear of getting judged and gain access to one’s body without feeling uncovered.

2. Right to Equality

Under Article 15(1), the state shall not discriminate against any citizen of India on the ground of sex. In addition to it, there shouldn’t be any discrimination on the grounds of sex when it comes to salary as according to the provisions of Equal Remuneration Act.

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3. Right against Dowry

Dowry prohibition act of 1961 is one of the most talked about rights of a woman. And is still a prevalent issue our society is grappling with. As per this right, the bride can file a case against her in-laws for coercing her to give dowry.

4. Right against Sexual Harassment at workplace

The Sexual Harassment of Women at Workplace (Prevention, Prohibition, and Redressal) Act (2013) provides protection to women from sexual harassment at all workplaces. As per this act, any organization that has over 10 employees must have a sexual harassment committee. This act vividly specifies that criticizing, insulting, rebuking or condemning a female employee in front of other employees also acclaim to sexual harassment.

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5.  Right against indecent Representation of Women

This Act forbids indecent representation of women through any print media or a visual media.

6. Right against Domestic Violence

A domestic abuse could be anything from tormenting mentally to bruising physically. The right gives protection against Domestic abuse of any kind to a married woman, women in live-in relationships and a woman living in joint family.

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7. Right to discontinue pregnancy

The right allows women to terminate pregnancy after consulting with medical practitioners on moral grounds under Pre-Conception and Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques (PCPNDT) Act of 1994

8. Right to Divorce

The Indian Divorce Act of 1969 allows the cessation of marriage through mutual consent of both the partners. Courts are established to file, hear, and dispose of such cases.

9. Right to virtual complaints

As stated by this right a woman has the prerogative of lodging a complaint via email or registered post. A woman can send a verbal complaint through an email or post addressed to Commissioner of Police, if for some unavoidable circumstance she could not go to the police station. The police can then come over to the residence of the victim to take her statement.

10. Right to no arrest

A woman cannot be arrested after sunset and before sunrise. There have been many cases of women being harassed by the police in dark time hours and thus this exercise is avoided now. However, in matters of grave concern, a letter signed by the magistrate is required explaining the urgency of the arrest.


Obtain power and by all means, power is a law of man – make it yours.

-prepared by Naina Mishra. Twitter-@Nainamishr94

 

 

 

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Sikkim Holds Exceptionally Steady And Silent Progress In Improving The Lives Of Ordinary People

Given the track record, it may be safe to predict that Sikkim might be the first Indian state to offer solutions to the rest of India - and the world.

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Sikkim, along with Meghalaya, occupies the top two positions in the best performing region of Northeast on women's empowerment index comprising of participation of women in household decisions, ownership of land, cell phones and bank account, and instances of spousal violence. Pixabay

Everyone knows that Sikkim is a small extraordinarily picturesque mountainous state tucked away in the Himalayas in the northeast of India. That indeed it is. Even today, there are only around 650,000 people living in the state. However, much less known about Sikkim to the rest of India – and also the world – is the exceptionally steady and silent progress in improving the lives of ordinary people that the state has recorded over the past two decades.

How did Sikkim achieve this? The obvious answer is that Sikkim, like many countries in the world, has ensured that policies that promote economic opportunities go hand-in-hand with policies that ensure an equitable expansion of health, education, nutrition and essential basic social services.

Less obvious is the critical role of political leadership in ensuring improvements in the lives of people. Ensuring that the additional tax revenues from economic growth are invested in expanding human capabilities does not happen automatically. Chief Minister Pawan Chamling – the longest serving Chief Minister of any Indian state – has prioritized investments in health, education and infrastructure like no other political leader has. After all, ensuring adequate funds for the social sectors is as much a function of the funds available as it is of making it a political priority. Very few political leaders in India and elsewhere recognize the importance of investing in people as Chamling does.

What goes even more unnoticed is the role that women have played in Sikkim’s development success. Traditionally women have enjoyed greater freedom in Sikkim than in many other parts of the country. The Sikkim Human Development Report revealed that the state had the best gender parity performance among the northeastern states, with female labour force participation at 40 per cent, much higher than the national average of around 26 per cent. In recent times, with the support of the state, they have played an active role in various spheres of life.

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Traditionally women have enjoyed greater freedom in Sikkim than in many other parts of the country.Pixabay

Sikkim’s women have exercised leadership by taking advantage of the available educational and development opportunities. This is revealed by the progress on multiple indicators from NFHS 3 to NFHS 4 recorded by Sikkim. According to the National Family Health Survey (NFHS 4), 41 per cent women in the state have 10 or more years of schooling – much better than the country’s average of 36 per cent. Only 15 per cent women, age 20-24 years, were married before age of 18 years as against the national average of 27 per cent. There are only 3 per cent teenage pregnancies in the state placing Sikkim as the best among the northeastern states. The infant mortality rate in the state is 30 against national average of 34. Sikkim has improved its performance with regard to safe delivery remarkably by 43 per cent points from NFHS 3 to 97 per cent in NFHS 4, the best in northeastern states.

Sikkim, along with Meghalaya, occupies the top two positions in the best performing region of Northeast on women’s empowerment index comprising of participation of women in household decisions, ownership of land, cell phones and bank account, and instances of spousal violence.

Women in Sikkim are more empowered to take decisions than women in other parts of the country. According to NFHS-4, in 2015-16, 85 per cent women have the freedom of movement, including to market, health facility and places outside the village or community compared to national average. Almost all (95 per cent) of currently married women in Sikkim participate in household decisions as against national average of 84 per cent. Nearly 80 per cent women in the state have mobile phones for personal use against 46 per cent at the national level. Close to two-thirds (64 per cent) of women in Sikkim – as against just over half 953 per cent) of women across India – have a bank or savings account that they themselves operate. Only 3 per cent ever married women have ever experience spousal violence as against 29 percent nationally – the lowest across Indian states.

Sikkim has, however, many things to worry about. This includes creating jobs for its young people within the state, improving the quality of education, protecting residents from natural disasters, expanding infrastructure and so on. Equally worrisome is the sharp decline in total fertility rate (TFR) – 1.2 in 2015-16 – which is well below the replacement level of 2.1. This sharp decline in TFR might have also contributed to the worsening of the female-to-male ratio at birth from 984 in 205-06 to 809 in 2015-16.

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Sikkim has, however, many things to worry about. This includes creating jobs for its young people within the state, improving the quality of education, protecting residents from natural disasters, expanding infrastructure and so on. Pixabay

The reduced TFR is not good news as it may result in an age-structural transformation wherein Sikkim, like Kerala, will have to address the challenges of an aging population. This could get manifested in the short supply of workers as well as a further decline in the sex ratio. With shrinking active labour force, Sikkim’s economy could experience loss in economic output and possibly a decline in income levels. There could also be an increase in the elderly dependency ratio and morbidity levels on account of a rise in non-communicable diseases. Sikkim will have to mobilize the resources needed to extend financial support of the elderly and make provisions to address, in particular, their health care needs. It will also have to deal with the challenge of declining fertility rates.

Also Read: Millennium City Is Witnessing Rise In Illegal Trade Of Marijuana

These challenges may not come as a surprise to the political leadership in Sikkim. They should not given how well Chief Minister Chamling and the executive are connected the people. Given the track record, it may be safe to predict that Sikkim might be the first Indian state to offer solutions to the rest of India – and the world. (IANS)