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2016 Warmest Year in United Kingdom (UK) Since 1850, says a British Official

Data for 2016 showed a current value of 0.84 degrees Celsius above the average for the 30-year period between 1961 and 1990

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London, Nov 15, 2016: Britain’s Met Office said that 2016 was on track to be the warmest year since instrumental records started in 1850.

If confirmed, when the final results are compiled at the end of the year, 2016 will be the third consecutive year of exceptionally-high average surface global temperatures, the Met office announced on Monday.

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“All of the warmest 10 years on record for global average surface temperature have occurred since 1997, according to a series data which begins in 1850,” said a spokesman.

Data for 2016 showed a current value of 0.84 degrees Celsius above the average for the 30-year period between 1961 and 1990.

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Professor Peter Stott of the Met Office, said: “Three record-breaking years for global temperature would be remarkable. The year 2015 was exceptionally warm and, like 2016, was influenced by the warm El Nino circulation in the tropical Pacific.”

The Met Office announcement coincides with a statement from the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) which says preliminary data shows that 2016’s global temperatures are approximately 1.2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels.

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The year 2016 is the second year running that global average surface temperatures have exceeded 1.0 degree Celsius on record since 1850.

The WMO figure for global average surface temperature from January to September 2016 has been about 0.88 degrees Celsius above the 1961 to 1990 reference period. (IANS)

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Rising Temperatures on Global Level May Spike Up Number of Deaths Due to Heat

It also urges countries to make additional efforts to limit warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius

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Global Warming has led to rapid rise in temperature in India. VOA

Countries need to keep global temperatures in check by meeting the goals set out in the Paris Agreement, or more people could die because of extreme temperatures, researchers have warned.

The Paris Agreement, adopted in 2015 under the auspices of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), binds nations to hold warming well below 2 degrees Celsius in global mean temperature, relative to pre-industrial levels.

It also urges countries to make additional efforts to limit warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

The study by researchers from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) indicated dramatic increases of heat-related deaths under extreme warming (3 degrees Celsius and 4 degrees Celsius) compared to the mildest threshold (1.5 degrees Celsius), with additional excess mortality ranging from over 0.73 per cent to nearly 9 per cent across all regions.

“Our projections suggest that large increases in temperature-related deaths could be limited in most regions if warming was kept below 2 degrees Celsius,” said lead author Ana Maria Vicedo-Cabrera from the varsity.

The net difference remained positive and high in most of the areas, even when potential decreases in cold-related deaths were considered.

Temperatures
NASA Map showing 2016 temperatures around the globe. VOA

However, net increase in deaths was still projected for warmer regions such as South America, South Europe, and South-East Asia (with changes ranging from more than 0.19 per cent to nearly one per cent), while in cooler regions the excess mortality was predicted to stay stable or drop slightly.

“Under extreme changes in climate, large parts of the world could experience a dramatic increase in excess mortality due to heat. This would not be balanced by decreases in cold-related deaths,” Vicedo-Cabrera added.

The results, appearing in the journal Climatic Change, is based on historical data on temperature-related deaths from 451 locations in 23 countries with different socio-economic and climatic conditions.

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Currently, we are on a trajectory to reach over 3 degrees Celsius of warming, and if this trend continues there would be serious consequences for health in many parts of the world, the researchers noted.

“Efforts to limit the increase in global temperatures to below 1.5 degrees Celsius could provide additional benefits in tropical or arid regions, including the most populous and often poorest countries,” Vicedo-Cabrera said. (IANS)