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48 Indians lodged in foreign prisons despite serving term: MEA

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photo credit: www.prameyanews7.com

By NewsGram Staff Writer

New Delhi: Despite having served their term, 48 Indian nationals proceeded to be lodged in foreign prisons and deportation centers, including 40 in Bangladesh.

photo credit: www.indiatvnews.com
photo credit: www.indiatvnews.com

“As per available information, there are 48 Indian nationals who have completed their sentences and are waiting for completion of deportation formalities in foreign jails and in deportation centers,” the external affairs ministry told the assurances committee of the Rajya Sabha on information sought by Avinash Rai, an MP from Punjab.

Of these, 40 Indians are lodged in various Bangladesh jails, five in Myanmar, two at a deportation centre in Bahrain and one in Malaysia.

About the reasons for delay in bringing them back, the ministry said, “Some information was to be collected from Indian missions abroad.”

“The number of Indian nationals who have completed their terms in various jails in Bangladesh is 40. Since July 2014, out of 37 prisoners, 16 have been released and repatriated. 19 new convicted and under-trial prisoners who have completed their sentences have been added to the previous list of released prisoners,” the ministry further stated.

The ministry also said Indian missions and posts also provide air tickets for facilitating the return of the Indian nationals.

(with inputs from TOI)

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Dengue Outbreak Breaks Record in Bangladesh, Hospitals Struggle to Find Space for Patients

Dengue is mostly caused by Aedes aegypti mosquito

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Aedes
Dengue is transmitted by the bite of the Aedes mosquito that typically attacks during day time. Pixabay

In one of the worst outbreak of dengue in Bangladesh, over 1,000 people, majority of them children, have been diagnosed with the disease in the last 24 hours, according to officials on Tuesday. While over 50 districts across the country had been affected, Dhaka, the national capital, home to more than 20 million people, was the worst-hit city with hospitals struggling to find space for patients, reports said.

Dengue is mostly caused by Aedes aegypti mosquito. “Aedes albopictus mosquito can also cause dengue,” Dr ASM Alamgir, a senior scientist at the Institute of Epidemiology Disease Control and Research (IEDCR), told bdnews24.com. “This type of mosquito is common in districts outside Dhaka as well,” he said.

“If the mosquito bites a dengue patient in Dhaka and travels out, the disease can spread to those areas,” he said. Former IEDCR Director Mahmudur Rahman called the situation “a cause for concern”. Eight people have died since January and more than 13,600 patients have been diagnosed with the mosquito-borne fever in 2019. Of this, 8,348 cases have been reported in July. In June 1,820 cases had been reported and 184 cases in May, according to official figures.

dengue
Eight people have died since January and more than 13,600 patients have been diagnosed with the mosquito-borne fever in 2019. Pixabay

Ayesha Akhter, Assistant Director at the Directorate General of Health Services, called it “the worst dengue outbreak we have seen in Bangladesh”. “We are making sure that all government and private hospitals are equipped to tackle the outbreak. A special section has been opened at Dhaka Medical College Hospital for dengue patients,” said Akhter.

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The Disease Control Division has sought technical assistance from the WHO to control mosquito population to help curb the spread of the diseases. The Health Ministry has developed national treatment guidelines and aims to raise awareness through advertisement in newspapers.

Several Asian countries are grappling with spread of mosquito-borne diseases, like dengue and malaria with the latter raising fears of a “potential global health emergency”. Multi-drug-resistant strains of malaria is spreading across Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam, according to two studies published in the Lancet. (IANS)