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A Ketogenic Diet May Increase Longevity and Improve Physical Strength

A new study indicates that a ketogenic diet can have a major impact on life and health span without major weight loss or restriction of intake.

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New York, Sep 06, 2017: Consuming a ketogenic diet — which is high fat, low protein, and low carbohydrates — may not only help in weight loss, but also increase longevity and improve physical strength, says a recent study. The study, conducted on mice models, showed a 13 per cent increase in median life span for the mice on a high fat versus high carbohydrate diet.

“In humans, that would be seven to 10 years. But equally important, those mice retained quality of health in later life,” said nutritionist Jon Ramsey from the University of California – Davis. In addition, the ketogenic diet increased memory and motor function (strength and coordination), and prevented an increase in age-related markers of inflammation. It also had an impact on the incidence of tumours as well, the researchers said.

The older mice on the ketogenic diet had a better memory than the younger mice, which is really remarkable, the researchers said. According to the study, detailed in the journal Cell Metabolism, eating a ketogenic diet ramps up the production of the ketone body beta-hydroxybutyrate acid (BHB), which helps improve memory and increases lifespan.

Also Read: Should we revive ancestral dietary lifestyle for good health? 

“This study indicates that a ketogenic diet can have a major impact on life and health span without major weight loss or restriction of intake. It also opens a new avenue for possible dietary interventions that have an impact on ageing,” Ramsey said.

For the study, mice were split into three groups: a regular rodent high-carb diet, a low carb/high fat diet, and a ketogenic diet (89-90 per cent of total calorie intake). The ultimate goal is to find a way for humans to benefit from BHBs without having to go on a restrictive diet, the researchers said. (IANS)

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Weight Loss May Reverse Heart Rhythm Disorder

People who lost weight experienced fewer symptoms, required less treatment and had better outcomes

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Metabolically healthy obesity is a debatable medical condition characterized by obesity which does not produce metabolic complications.
Metabolically healthy obesity is a debatable medical condition characterized by obesity which does not produce metabolic complications. Pixabay

Losing weight may reverse or reduce the progression of irregular heart rhythm disorder among obese people, claim researchers, including one of Indian origin.

The findings showed that reducing weight by 10 per cent along with management of associated risk factors can reduce the effects of Atrial fibrillation (AF), a leading cause of stroke which can lead to heart failure among overweight people.

People who lost weight experienced fewer symptoms, required less treatment and had better outcomes.

Stop Obesity
Stop Obesity. Pixabay

“This is the first time that evidence has been found that if people who are obese and are suffering from atrial fibrillation the disease can be alleviated by losing weight and treating lifestyle factors,” said lead author Melissa Middeldorp from the University of Adelaide in Australia.

AF is a progressive disease in which initial short, intermittent symptoms develop into more sustained forms of the condition. Obesity and lifestyle factors are associated with its progression.

Also Read: Overweight in Middle Age Linked to Low Breast Cancer Risk

“This study shows that weight-loss and treating lifestyle factors is an essential component for effectively managing AF, in many instances being an alternative to surgery or drug intervention,” added Professor Prashanthan Sanders from the varsity.

In the study, published in the journal Europace, the team analysed 355 overweight people who lost varying amounts of weight. (IANS)