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A Ketogenic Diet May Increase Longevity and Improve Physical Strength

A new study indicates that a ketogenic diet can have a major impact on life and health span without major weight loss or restriction of intake.

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Low Carb Diet. Pixabay
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New York, Sep 06, 2017: Consuming a ketogenic diet — which is high fat, low protein, and low carbohydrates — may not only help in weight loss, but also increase longevity and improve physical strength, says a recent study. The study, conducted on mice models, showed a 13 per cent increase in median life span for the mice on a high fat versus high carbohydrate diet.

“In humans, that would be seven to 10 years. But equally important, those mice retained quality of health in later life,” said nutritionist Jon Ramsey from the University of California – Davis. In addition, the ketogenic diet increased memory and motor function (strength and coordination), and prevented an increase in age-related markers of inflammation. It also had an impact on the incidence of tumours as well, the researchers said.

The older mice on the ketogenic diet had a better memory than the younger mice, which is really remarkable, the researchers said. According to the study, detailed in the journal Cell Metabolism, eating a ketogenic diet ramps up the production of the ketone body beta-hydroxybutyrate acid (BHB), which helps improve memory and increases lifespan.

Also Read: Should we revive ancestral dietary lifestyle for good health? 

“This study indicates that a ketogenic diet can have a major impact on life and health span without major weight loss or restriction of intake. It also opens a new avenue for possible dietary interventions that have an impact on ageing,” Ramsey said.

For the study, mice were split into three groups: a regular rodent high-carb diet, a low carb/high fat diet, and a ketogenic diet (89-90 per cent of total calorie intake). The ultimate goal is to find a way for humans to benefit from BHBs without having to go on a restrictive diet, the researchers said. (IANS)

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Losing Weight Can Help Lower The Risk of Breast Cancer For Post-menopausal Women

"These findings, taken together, provide strong correlative evidence that a modest weight loss programme can impact breast cancer,"

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Photo: neqotkukhealthcenter.ca

Women, please take a note. Losing weight can help lower the risk of developing breast cancer in the post-menopausal stage, a new study has found.

The study, published in the journal CANCER, found that among post-menopausal women, participants who lost weight had a lower risk of developing invasive breast cancer than those who maintained or gained weight.

“Our study indicates that moderate, relatively short-term weight reduction was associated with a statistically significant reduction in breast cancer risk for postmenopausal women,” said co-author Rowan Chlebowski from the City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte, California.

Although obesity has been strongly related to breast cancer risk, studies examining whether weight loss might reduce postmenopausal women’s risk have provided mixed results, the researchers said.

For the study, the research team analysed information on 61,335 women participating in the World Health Initiative Observational Study who had no prior history of breast cancer and had normal mammogram results.

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Weight loss may lower breast cancer risk for post-menopausal women. Pixabay

The participant’s body weight, height and body mass index were assessed at the start of the study and again three years later.

The team found that during an average follow-up of 11.4 years, there were 3,061 new cases of invasive breast cancer diagnosed.

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“These are observational results, but they are also supported by randomised clinical trial evidence from the Women’s Health Initiative Dietary Modification trial where, in a randomised clinical trial setting, adopting a low-fat dietary pattern that was associated with a similar magnitude of weight loss resulted in a significant improvement in breast cancer overall survival,” Chlebowski said.

“These findings, taken together, provide strong correlative evidence that a modest weight loss programme can impact breast cancer,” he noted. (IANS)

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