Thursday March 21, 2019

A Ketogenic Diet May Increase Longevity and Improve Physical Strength

A new study indicates that a ketogenic diet can have a major impact on life and health span without major weight loss or restriction of intake.

0
//
ketogenic diet
Low Carb Diet. Pixabay

New York, Sep 06, 2017: Consuming a ketogenic diet — which is high fat, low protein, and low carbohydrates — may not only help in weight loss, but also increase longevity and improve physical strength, says a recent study. The study, conducted on mice models, showed a 13 per cent increase in median life span for the mice on a high fat versus high carbohydrate diet.

“In humans, that would be seven to 10 years. But equally important, those mice retained quality of health in later life,” said nutritionist Jon Ramsey from the University of California – Davis. In addition, the ketogenic diet increased memory and motor function (strength and coordination), and prevented an increase in age-related markers of inflammation. It also had an impact on the incidence of tumours as well, the researchers said.

The older mice on the ketogenic diet had a better memory than the younger mice, which is really remarkable, the researchers said. According to the study, detailed in the journal Cell Metabolism, eating a ketogenic diet ramps up the production of the ketone body beta-hydroxybutyrate acid (BHB), which helps improve memory and increases lifespan.

Also Read: Should we revive ancestral dietary lifestyle for good health? 

“This study indicates that a ketogenic diet can have a major impact on life and health span without major weight loss or restriction of intake. It also opens a new avenue for possible dietary interventions that have an impact on ageing,” Ramsey said.

For the study, mice were split into three groups: a regular rodent high-carb diet, a low carb/high fat diet, and a ketogenic diet (89-90 per cent of total calorie intake). The ultimate goal is to find a way for humans to benefit from BHBs without having to go on a restrictive diet, the researchers said. (IANS)

Next Story

Consuming Low-fibre, High-fat Diet Can Spike up Risk of Sepsis

The team also identified molecular markers in Western diet-fed mice that could be used as predictors or biomarkers for patients that are at high risk for severe sepsis or patients that may need more aggressive treatment

0
Diet
A dish of steak and cheese pasta is ready to eat in Concord, N.H., June 9, 2014. Two major studies in 2018 provided more fuel for the debate around carbs and fats, yet failed to offer a resolution to the polarizing matter of the best way to lose weight. VOA

Consuming a Western diet, low in fibre and high in fat and sugar, can put you at increased risk of developing severe sepsis, researchers say.

The study, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found mice that were fed the Western diet showed an increase in chronic inflammation, sepsis severity and higher mortality rates than mice that were fed a normal diet.

Sepsis is a potentially life-threatening condition caused by the body’s response to an infection. It can lead to shock and organ failure. It is one of the most common cause of death worldwide.

According to the researchers, including Brooke Napier from the Portland State University, the mice had more severe sepsis and were dying faster because of something in their diet, not because of the weight gain or microbiome, the body’s community of bacteria.

“The mice’s immune system on the Western diet looked and functioned differently. It looks like the diet is manipulating immune cell function so that you are more susceptible to sepsis, and then when you get sepsis, you die quicker,” Napier said.

Food , delivery, diet
Low-fibre, high-fat diet may up severe sepsis risk. Flickr

The researcher said the findings can help hospitals better monitor the diets of patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) since they are already the ones most likely to develop sepsis.

“If you know that a diet high in fat and sugar correlates with increased susceptibility to sepsis and increased mortality when those patients are in the ICU, you can make sure they’re eating the right fats and the right ratio of fats,” she said.

Also Read- Contraceptive Pills May Impair Women’s Ability to Recognise Emotion: Study

“If you could introduce a dietary intervention while they are in the ICU to decrease their chances of manipulating their immune system in that way, you can somehow influence the outcome,” she added.

The team also identified molecular markers in Western diet-fed mice that could be used as predictors or biomarkers for patients that are at high risk for severe sepsis or patients that may need more aggressive treatment. (IANS)