Wednesday January 24, 2018

A Ketogenic Diet May Increase Longevity and Improve Physical Strength

A new study indicates that a ketogenic diet can have a major impact on life and health span without major weight loss or restriction of intake.

0
//
71
ketogenic diet
Low Carb Diet. Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

New York, Sep 06, 2017: Consuming a ketogenic diet — which is high fat, low protein, and low carbohydrates — may not only help in weight loss, but also increase longevity and improve physical strength, says a recent study. The study, conducted on mice models, showed a 13 per cent increase in median life span for the mice on a high fat versus high carbohydrate diet.

“In humans, that would be seven to 10 years. But equally important, those mice retained quality of health in later life,” said nutritionist Jon Ramsey from the University of California – Davis. In addition, the ketogenic diet increased memory and motor function (strength and coordination), and prevented an increase in age-related markers of inflammation. It also had an impact on the incidence of tumours as well, the researchers said.

The older mice on the ketogenic diet had a better memory than the younger mice, which is really remarkable, the researchers said. According to the study, detailed in the journal Cell Metabolism, eating a ketogenic diet ramps up the production of the ketone body beta-hydroxybutyrate acid (BHB), which helps improve memory and increases lifespan.

Also Read: Should we revive ancestral dietary lifestyle for good health? 

“This study indicates that a ketogenic diet can have a major impact on life and health span without major weight loss or restriction of intake. It also opens a new avenue for possible dietary interventions that have an impact on ageing,” Ramsey said.

For the study, mice were split into three groups: a regular rodent high-carb diet, a low carb/high fat diet, and a ketogenic diet (89-90 per cent of total calorie intake). The ultimate goal is to find a way for humans to benefit from BHBs without having to go on a restrictive diet, the researchers said. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

How weight loss surgery will decrease heart disease risk

A study conducted on 242 adolescents who were diagnosed with hearth risk factors at the baseline

0
//
19
Bariatric surgery decreases heart disease risk. Pixabay
Bariatric surgery decreases heart disease risk. Pixabay

Obesity can result in heart disease risk, everyone is aware of it. However, these is new way to maintain the health of your heart. Weight loss surgery can decrease the risk of heart disease, a study says.

“This is the first large-scale analysis of predictors of change in cardiovascular disease risk factors among adolescents following bariatric surgery,” said Marc P Michalsky, Professor at the Ohio State University College in the US.

Also read: 4 Ways to Beat the Risk of Heart Attack in your 30s

Findings

Three years after surgery, teens who underwent a gastric bypass had a 27 percent drop in their BMI, similar to the 26 percent drop in those who had the sleeve gastrectomy. Pixabay
Three years after surgery, teens who underwent a gastric bypass had a 27 percent drop in their BMI, similar to the 26 percent drop in those who had the sleeve gastrectomy. Pixabay
  • Bariatric or weight-loss surgery performed during adolescence may provide unique benefits.
  • It minimizes the development and progression of impaired glucose metabolism, atherosclerosis heart failure and stroke.
  • Prior to the bariatric surgery, 33% of the participants had three or more defined cardiovascular disease risk factors.
  • Three years post-surgery, only 5% of the study participants had three or more risk factors; representing significant reduction in the overall likelihood of developing cardiovascular disease later in life.
  • Not only weight loss, the surgery also reduced dyslipidemia risk among teenager — a condition marked by an abnormally increased level of cholesterol in the blood, when compared to the older people.

Methodology

  • The study was conducted on 242 adolescents who were diagnosed with hearth risk factors at the baseline.
  • Among 242 participants of the study, 161 underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass procedure, 67 of them underwent a vertical sleeve gastrectomy and 14, adjustable gastric banding.
  • The authors collected data from five participating medical centers for their observational study, and decisions about procedures depended on each center’s clinical practices.
  • The participants had a BMI between 34 to 88 when the study began. A BMI over 25 is considered overweight; over 30 is obese.

You may also like: Worried About Your Heart’s Health? Make These 5 Spices a Part of Your Diet and See the Benefits Yourself!

The study was conducted on 242 adolescents who were diagnosed with hearth risk factors at the baseline. Pixabay
The study was conducted on 242 adolescents who were diagnosed with hearth risk factors at the baseline. Pixabay

Conclusion

  • The obesity classification with the highest risks of health problems is a BMI of 40 or higher. Three years after surgery, teens who underwent a gastric bypass had a 27 percent drop in their BMI, similar to the 26 percent drop in those who had the sleeve gastrectomy. Those with the gastric band had an 8 percent drop in BMI.

“The study demonstrated early improvement and reduction of cardio-metabolic risk factors, offering compelling support for bariatric surgery in adolescents,” Michalsky added.

The study was published in the online journal Pediatrics. (IANS)