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A Luxury Smartphone with 18-carat Gold Dragon decoration evokes criticism from Chinese Social Media Users

Designed in partnership with the Palace Museum, the gem-laden smartphone comes in a limited run of 999 devices

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(Representative Image) A person holding Apple Smartphone. Pixabay

Beijing, December 23, 2016: A gaudy Forbidden City-themed luxury smartphone that comes with an 18-carat gold dragon decoration and a screen made from sapphire glass has evoked criticism from Chinese social media users.

According to the Global Times, the “Titanium Palace Edition” smartphone is expected to be released in January and is priced at 19,999 yuan ($2,880).

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Designed in partnership with the Palace Museum, the gem-laden smartphone comes in a limited run of 999 devices.

“Phone makers ‘8488’ partnered with the Palace Museum to create the limited-edition device inspired by the museum’s imperial collections,” the report quoted a company post on Sina Weibo platform as saying.

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Sina Weibo users called the phone “ostentatious” and a “stain on the sacredness of the imperial city”.

Responding to criticism, the Palace Museum tried to distance itself from the product or its manufacturing.

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However, earlier this year, Wang Yamin, Vice President of the Palace Museum was quoted by media as saying: “We hope this cooperation will help the Forbidden City enter the tech industry.” (IANS)

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UN: Geneva Can Improve the Health of Citizens Using Digital Technology

Chief WHO scientist Soumya Swaminathan said increased availability and use of digital technology offers new opportunities to improve people's health

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health, citizens, digital technology
FILE - A doctor uses a smartphone to take a photo of a child with facial deformity before surgery at the Vietnam Cuba hospital in Hanoi, Vietnam. VOA

The World Health Organization (WHO) has issued its first guidelines on digital health intervention.

The U.N. agency said governments can improve the health of their citizens by using digital technology to make health systems more efficient and responsive to their patients. The United Nations said 51 percent of the world’s population has access to broadband internet service.

Chief WHO scientist Soumya Swaminathan said increased availability and use of digital technology offers new opportunities to improve people’s health.

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Chief WHO scientist Soumya Swaminathan said increased availability and use of digital technology offers new opportunities to improve people’s health. Pixabay

She told VOA the technology enables people, even in the remotest settings, to leapfrog into the development of a more effective, inclusive health system. With the use of mobile phones, computers and laptops, she said it is possible to bypass the intervening stages many countries have had to go through.

“So, a health worker in Congo can directly start using a mobile phone if the government is able to provide one to the health worker and get away from filling 30 paper registers, which occupy about one-third of front-line health workers time,” she added.

New recommendations

The new guidelines include 10 recommendations on how governments can use digital technology for maximum impact on their health systems.

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The new guidelines include 10 recommendations on how governments can use digital technology for maximum impact on their health systems. Pixabay

A WHO scientist specializing in digital innovations and research, Garrett Mehl, said the recommendations deal with issues such as birth notification.

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“Knowing that a baby has been born is critical to knowing how to provide vaccinations; knowing that the mother needs different post-natal care visits,” he said. “But without knowing that there was a birth that has happened, it is difficult to trigger those events in the health system.”

The guidelines also address privacy concerns.They have recommendations for ensuring that sensitive data, such as issues of sexual and reproductive health, are protected and not put at risk. (VOA)