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AAP government to make DTC buses Wi-Fi enabled in next two to three months

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Delhi Transport Corporation with the support from the ruling Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) is working on a plan to make buses Wi-Fi enabled in the next two to three months. The plan is a part of an overall policy of the state government to encourage the usage of public transport.

The pilot project is named as Proof of Concept (POC), and will currently be deployed at a test phase to check its efficiency.

The much endeavored plan by the ruling AAP not only intends to upgrade the DTC buses, but also a few selected areas of the city, as Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal plans to make 1,000 localities in the city Wi-Fi enabled by the first quarter of 2016.

Explaining about the project, Delhi Dialogue Commission Vice-Chairman, Ashish Khetan, said, “The government has given approval for the POC. We will learn from the experiment and then see how we can take this forward. This is the first time that any city is trying to roll out public Wi-Fi at such a massive scale. We want to have well-defined public areas like government offices, schools, hospitals, community centers and parks where Wi-Fi should be freely available at all times. To make this happen, a revenue model has to be prepared.”

He also specified that the government might sign an agreement with the interested firms within two weeks.

“We studied the Stockholm model where they invested heavily over 20 years in laying out a fiber optic cable network. This network belongs to the government and the network led to an IT and telecom revolution in the city,” Khetan said.

Khetan’s prime concern is fiber optic cable network’s scarcity in the national capital. “With data usage expected to go up, this network will have to be strengthened and this is one area that the government is now planning to focus on,” he said.

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Why You Should Watch Political Documentary Series Transparency: Pardarshita?

Transparency is not an experiment, rather it is a tale of the experience and anguish of a common man, who is in search of accountability

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Transparency
Transparency doesn't only take you to this corporeal world of Indian Politics, but it tells you to raise your voice against the corrupt practices along with believing in what exists as the "Truth". Twitter

– By Kashish Rai

In reality, documentaries are not merely the projection of a story, it is more a story of a life, it’s a story of survival, it’s a story of a time in which people live, it’s a story of success and failure.

In India, the entertainment industry has lagged in providing realistic content which defines the actual aesthetic of a documentary, exclusively in political thrillers. It is a big deal in itself to inculcate real-life accounts and actual scenarios pertaining to an event that has brought a revolution, and undoubtedly, you can see that in Transparency: Pardarshita.

Transparency Webseries is a waypost in the world of political Thrillers in India which exclusively highlights the off-stage candours associated with the famous India Against Corruption Movement (popularly known as the Anna Andolan) and the evolution of Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) whose genesis pertains to the famous movement.

You can Watch The Documentary Series Here: https://transparencywebseries.com/

Transparency is not an experiment, rather it is a tale of the experience and anguish of a common man, who is in search of accountability. This 6-episode documentary unravels how the AAP demolished its fundamental principles based on financial transparency, decentralisation of power and internal vigilance upon which it laid its foundation just for the sake of getting in power.

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After coming to power, AAP not only dismantled its core principles but abandoned its idealism and slaughtered the trust of thousands of people who dreamt of a corruption-free India. AAP also collected public funds to contest elections but gradually when it uprooted~ it removed its donors’ list from the website. Thus, Pardarshita at the same time yearns for clean political funding and the failure of the new system.

It may be easy for you to connect your life with an ordinary film but here it is much easier for you to connect with Transparency as you may better understand the sentiments of a “common man” who inevitably dreams to eradicate corruption from the system.

Transparency
Transparency is not an experiment, rather it is a tale of the experience and anguish of a common man, who is in search of accountability. Twitter

Transparency doesn’t only take you to this corporeal world of Indian Politics, but it tells you to raise your voice against the corrupt practices along with believing in what exists as the “Truth”.

Documentary films are the only place where people can speak for themselves, and Transparency is one such pedestal.

It urges people to look at themselves, to look at what has been done wrong and through that really count for the future to come.. and precisely, this is what is the vision of the director, Dr. Munish Raizada, who has himself been part of this mass movement and the Aam Aadmi Party.

ALSO READ: Taking Advantage of the Booming Solar Industry

For this very reason, you should watch Transparency, not to become subjective but to be objective of what is the subsisting need of the hour.

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Google Researches About Remote Communication Among Workers

Google decodes why remote video calls don't excite some workers

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Google
Google has made an effort to dig into the science behind remote communication and found some interesting nuggets of information for workers. Pixabay

As millions across the globe work remotely via video calls, most of them miss in-person, face-to-face conversations in offices and there is nothing wrong in disliking remote meetings.

Google has made an effort to dig into the science behind remote communication and found some interesting nuggets of information for workers.

According to Zachary Yorke, UX Researcher at Google, humans are hardwired for the fast-paced exchange of in-person conversation.

Humans have spent about 70,000 years learning to communicate face-to-face, but video conferencing is only about 100 years old. When the sound from someone’s mouth doesn’t reach your ears until a half second later, you notice,” said Yorke. That’s because we’re ingrained to avoid talking at the same time while minimizing silence between turns.

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According to Zachary Yorke, UX Researcher at Google, humans are hardwired for the fast-paced exchange of in-person conversation. Pixabay

A delay of five-tenths of a second (500 millisecond) — whether from laggy audio or fumbling for the unmute button — is more than double what we’re used to in-person. These delays mess with the fundamental turn-taking mechanics of our conversations. At the office, meetings usually start with some impromptu, informal small talk. We share personal tidbits that build rapport and empathy.

“Making time for personal connections in remote meetings not only feels good, it helps you work better together. Science shows that teams who periodically share personal information perform better than teams who don’t. And when leaders model this, it can boost team performance even more,” suggested the Google executive.

Research shows that on video calls where social cues are harder to see, we take 25 per cent fewer speaking turns. But video calls have something email doesn’t: eye contact. “We feel more comfortable talking when our listeners’ eyes are visible because we can read their emotions and attitudes. This is especially important when we need more certainty—like when we meet a new team member or listen to a complex idea,” Yorke noted.

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When things go wrong, remote teams are more likely to blame individuals rather than examining the situation, which hurts cohesion and performance. “Have an open conversation with your remote teammates about your preferred working styles and how you might complement each other,” said Google.

Also Read- Astrology, Zodiac Sign and COVID-19: What is the relation?

Conversations on calls are less dynamic, and the proverbial “talking stick” gets passed less often.

“Identify calls where conversational dynamics could be better. Encourage more balanced conversation, help some get their voice heard and remind others to pass the talking stick,” said Yorke. (IANS)

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Transparency Documentary Series Review: Unique and Talks About the Working of AAP

The impact of the film might have been much greater if writer-director Munish Raizada had shortened its length and focused on a single issue

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Transparency
One must congratulate Munish Raizada for making Transparency: Pardarshita. Twitter

By Suyog Zore

First of all, one must congratulate Munish Raizada for making Transparency: Pardarshita. Making a documentary film, let alone a six-part documentary series, on politics in India is not an easy task.

Raizada has made a documentary series on one of the biggest uprisings India has seen after the freedom movement and the Emergency, the Jan Lokpal andolan, also known as the India Against Corruption (IAC) movement. He tries to find answers to how the uprising was planned, how it gave rise to the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP), and how the party that came to power in the national capital territory of Delhi with the promise of transparency slowly went off track.

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Transparency is a six-part documentary series written, directed and produced by Munish Raizada, who was himself a member of AAP at one time. In the documentary, he traces AAP’s journey from its inception to now. In this process, he meets old colleagues of party founder and Delhi chief minister Arvind Kejriwal as well as others who joined and then left the party.

The first episode, titled Dream Game, deals with how the Anna Hazare movement was organized by people like Kumar Vishwas, Kejriwal, Prashant Bhushan and some other activists. The episode is very informative and tells us how no movement takes place on the spur of the moment. It takes a lot of time, dedicated people and a lot of effort to create a successful movement like Anna Hazare’s Jan Lokpal Andolan.

Transparency
Transparency is a six-part documentary series written, directed and produced by Munish Raizada, who was himself a member of AAP at one time. Twitter

The third episode focuses on how the IAC came to be formed and what it did. Both these episodes focus on how Arvind Kejriwal used the popularity of the movement as a launch pad for his own political career. Raizada interviews Kejriwal’s former friends and activists like Shazia Ilmi, Kapil Mishra and Kiran Bedi who testify that Kejriwal harboured political ambition from the start. It should be noted, however, that all of these former friends are now part of the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party, the foremost rival of AAP in Delhi.

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Raizada uses real footage from the Jan Lokpal movement and from AAP’s formation and victory in the Delhi assembly election of 2015. He juxtaposes visuals of the euphoria among Delhi’s citizens when AAP came to power for the first time with the current situation and tries to find out where things went wrong.

The most important episode of this documentary is number 4, which is titled The Mask. The episode is split into two parts, 4A and 4B. In this two-part episode, Raizada meets many long-standing associates of Kejriwal and tries to dissect his personality. The documentary claims that Kejriwal, who has a proven track record as an activist in the public domain, has a different personality for insiders of the Anna agitation and the Aam Aadmi Party.

Raizada also tries to find answers to many questions like why did AAP stop showing its list of donors on its website and why the party never implemented an internal Lokpal. However, Raizada expects the viewer to be familiar with the Indian political scenario and how things were in those days and that’s why the episode may not interest those who have not kept themselves up-to-date with politics in India. But then, someone who isn’t familiar with Indian politics may not invest six hours of his life in this documentary either.

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The length of the series is the biggest problem with this documentary. Almost six hours long, it is stuffed with too much information to process. By the time you reach the final episode, you are likely to have forgotten some important information from earlier episodes. Maybe if Raizada had focused his effort more sharply on the issue of transparency in AAP and dug out more information, it might have made greater impact.

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Another problem is Raizada’s fixation with dramatization. As he mentioned in an interview with Cinestaan.com, he had initially planned a feature film on the subject but later dropped the idea. Perhaps he could not completely let go of the thought, however, because he uses elements from the typical commercial template, like a melodramatic background score, to hammer his message home. All it does is dilute the authenticity of the documentary.

Despite these flaws, Transparency: Pardarshita is a brave and praiseworthy effort. 

You can watch Transparency series here: https://transparencywebseries.com/

Copyright: Cinestaan.com