Wednesday March 20, 2019

Actress Kareena Kapoor Khan Emphasis On Women Education To Bring Child Vaccination Awareness

Kareena told the media here on Thursday: "This is a special and personal project for me because I am also a young mother and Taimur is going through the process of vaccination.

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Kareena said: "Yes, a mother can be concerned on such grounds, but you should discuss those matters with your doctor. Educate yourself, trust your doctor and understand that by vaccinating your child, you are securing his/her future from some of the fatal diseases." Pixabay

Actress Kareena Kapoor Khan, who has been appointed ambassador for the Swasth Immunised India campaign, says educating the women will help in spreading awareness about the initiative of child vaccination in the most impactful way.

Kareena told the media here on Thursday: “This is a special and personal project for me because I am also a young mother and Taimur is going through the process of vaccination. But at the same time, I would also like to mention that female literacy is equally important to get success in this campaign.

“Without a mother who is educated enough to understand the importance of vaccination…she won’t take her child to the doctor. And I know it as a matter of fact that a mother takes the best care of a child. So, we have to create awareness among the parents and we need a lot of public support to prevent the future generation from diseases, and have a healthy well-immunised India.”

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Actress Kareena Kapoor Khan. Wikimedia Commons

Adar Poonawalla, CEO of the Serum Institute of India, and Natasha Poonawalla were also present at the launch event.

Some women who were a part of the event pointed out that one of the problems they face is when a child suffers from fever after taking the vaccine. So, it makes them hesitant to take their children for vaccination.

Kareena said: “Yes, a mother can be concerned on such grounds, but you should discuss those matters with your doctor. Educate yourself, trust your doctor and understand that by vaccinating your child, you are securing his/her future from some of the fatal diseases.”

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Some women who were a part of the event pointed out that one of the problems they face is when a child suffers from fever after taking the vaccine. So, it makes them hesitant to take their children for vaccination. Pixabay

On the importance of the involvement of a celebrity with such a campaign, the actress said: “Well, we can see how the polio campaign is successful in our country where we have managed to eradicate polio from a generation. Thousands of people who saw that Mr. Bachchan (Amitabh Bachchan, the brand ambassador of the polio campaign) was urging parents to take their children for the vaccination, they connected with him, so they thought if Mr. Bachchan is saying it’s important, surely it is.

Also Read: Northeast Not Homogenous But Diverse Grouping of Communities
“Similarly, I am sure that many young mothers will feel connected with me because I am doing this for my child. If my baby is growing healthy after taking the vaccine, it is safe for all the babies.” (IANS)

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Know How Ohio Teenager Defined His Anti-Vaccine Mother, Believing It Caused Autism

Lindenberger first made headlines late last year when he posted a message on social media saying "My parents think vaccines are some kind of government scheme ... God knows how I'm still alive," and asked for guidance on how to protect himself.

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Ethan Lindenberger testifies during a Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, March 5, 2019, to examine vaccines, focusing on preventable disease outbreaks. VOA

An Ohio teenager who defied his anti-vaccine mother and received shots against several dangerous diseases was the star witness at a Senate hearing Tuesday.

Eighteen-year-old Ethan Lindenberger said he did his own research and concluded his mother is wrong in believing vaccines are unsafe and cause autism.

Sarah Myriam of New Jersey holds her daughter Aliyah, 2, as they join activists opposed to vaccinations outside a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, March 5, 2019.
Sarah Myriam of New Jersey holds her daughter Aliyah, 2, as they join activists opposed to vaccinations outside a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, March 5, 2019. VOA

Lindenberger said his mother’s “love, affection and care are apparent” but said his school in Norwalk, Ohio, saw him as a “health threat” because of the danger he could become sick with a contagious disease.

He testified that his own research convinced him vaccines are safe, but still failed to convince his mother.

Without her approval, Lindenberger got himself inoculated against hepatitis, influenza, tetanus, human papillomavirus, polio, and measles, mumps and rubella.

He said his mother still turns to what he calls “illegitimate sources that instill fear into the public.”

Ethan Lindenberger shakes hands with Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee chairman, Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., right, before the start of a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, March 5, 2019, to examine vaccines.
Ethan Lindenberger shakes hands with Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee chairman, Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., right, before the start of a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, March 5, 2019, to examine vaccines. VOA

Lindenberger first made headlines late last year when he posted a message on social media saying “My parents think vaccines are some kind of government scheme … God knows how I’m still alive,” and asked for guidance on how to protect himself.

Also Read: TikTok Addicted India Before Elections

He said thousands of other kids posted similar statements and said he wants youngsters to know that they do not always need their parents’ permission to get vaccinated.

Tuesday’s Senate hearing on vaccines was called, in part, to address an outbreak of measles.

There are 200 known cases in 11 states so far this year with the Pacific Northwest hardest hit. (VOA)