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Africa’s Mixed Feelings about Donald Trump’s U.S. Election Win: America not ready for a Female President yet?

More than a few Africans are worried about the policy changes Trump may implement.

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Kenya's opposition leader Raila Odinga speaking to U.S. Ambassador Robert Godec during an election results watch breakfast at the ambassador’s home in Nairobi, Nov. 9, 2016. VOA
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Nairobi, November 10, 2016: Feelings about Donald Trump’s U.S. election win are mixed in Africa.

In Kenya, where President Barack Obama has familial roots, many were hoping Hillary Clinton could carry on his legacy, but were prepared for disappointment.

“Personally, I think it [Trump’s win] was expected because I don’t think America was ready for a female president just yet,” said Jamila Wafula, a student at Jomo Kenyatta University near Nairobi. “We were really hoping that Clinton would win, but it was expected for Trump to win.”

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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign rally, Nov. 6, 2016, in Manchester, N.H. VOA
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign rally, Nov. 6, 2016, in Manchester, N.H. VOA

Sara Asafu-Adjaye, a Ghanaian social activist, says she would have loved to have seen the first female U.S. president.

“Not only is it that she is a woman. She’s a competent woman,” said Asafu-Adjaye. “And the fact that millions, over 48 percent of Americans believe that she’s not the better person for the job, it scares me.”

Charles Eboune, an international relations expert in Cameroon, was dismayed Clinton’s decades of experience in Washington was not enough to carry her to victory.

“[If] you look at the caliber of the lady who was in front of him in the election and all those who backed her, it was another translation that [the] majority is not always right,” said Eboune.

Change in style

Now, Africans have to adjust to the fact that a president with a very different style and priorities from both Obama and Clinton is going to take office.

More than a few Africans are worried about the policy changes Trump may implement.

“It might slow down immigration, probably from African countries toward the U.S.,” said Francis Kouamé in Ivory Coast. “It is going to make it more difficult. Really, I’m not happy that he won.”

Cardboard cutouts of both candidates on display during a breakfast at the home of U.S. ambassador in Nairobi, Kenya. VOA
Cardboard cutouts of both candidates on display during a breakfast at the home of U.S. ambassador in Nairobi, Kenya. VOA

A Congolese newspaper reported the election results as “The Trump Surprise,” while a popular Senegalese website displayed a photo of Trump, with a headline playing on the president-elect’s last name and the French verb se tromper, “to make a mistake.”

But an administrative worker in Dakar tries to remain optimistic about America’s choice of president.

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“I am a little disappointed, because I supported Hillary Clinton, but I see that the people of the United States have chosen their president,” said Moussa Traore. “Donald Trump is not bad. The essential is that the people are a little unhappy to hear this, but maybe there will be change.”

President-elect Donald Trump pumps his fist after giving his acceptance speech as his wife Melania Trump, right, and their son Barron Trump follow him during his election night rally, Nov. 9, 2016, in New York. VOA
President-elect Donald Trump pumps his fist after giving his acceptance speech as his wife Melania Trump, right, and their son Barron Trump follow him during his election night rally, Nov. 9, 2016, in New York. VOA

Keith Benon Robe was active in Uganda’s opposition during his country’s presidential elections earlier this year. He says he is excited because he believes Trump will stand up to Africa’s dictators.

“I jumped off my feet in celebration. I was so joyous and I’m still, it’s just unbelievable,” said Robe. “I’m sure the economy will be better, better than it is right now. And I trust him because he’s a businessman; he’s going to change everything. But the main point is he’s going to help us change this regime, which we’re tired of.”

A good example

The fact that Trump was legitimately elected was not lost on some Africans, who have seen many rigged or suspect elections in their time.

Stanley, a history teacher at the Institut Supérieur Pédagogique de la Gombe in Kinshasa who preferred not to give his last name, says that regardless of winner, the American election cycle sets a good example for other countries.

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“The lessons which I draw as a Congolese citizen, as an African, is that it’s a handover of power, clear and clean, without problem. Mrs. Clinton has even called Trump to congratulate him,” said Stanley.

FILE - Malik Obama, half-brother of President Barack Obama, seen in a Nov. 4, 2012 photo. VOA
FILE – Malik Obama, half-brother of President Barack Obama, seen in a Nov. 4, 2012 photo. VOA

African leaders and politicians in Kenya, South Africa, Uganda, Tanzania, Burundi, the Democratic Republic on Congo and Somalia, to name a few, have already sent or tweeted messages to Trump, congratulating him on his victory. Malik Obama, President Obama’s half-brother, has also congratulated Trump. (VOA)

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  • gene

    No, we do NOT need a woman president! We don’t need a man president, either..or a gay president, or a Hispanic president, or whatever. We need a GOOD president. (Hopefully, we’ve finally elected one.) We are ELECTING A LEADER; NOT choosing a MASCOT.

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FIFA World Cup 2018: Indian Cuisine becomes the most sought after in Moscow

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Indian cuisine in FIFA World cup
Indian dishes available in Moscow during FIFA World Cup 2018, representational image, wikimedia commons

June 17, 2018:

Restaurateurs Prodyut and Sumana Mukherjee have not only brought Indian cuisine to the ongoing FIFA World Cup 2018 here but also plan to dish out free dinner to countrymen if Argentina wins the trophy on July 15.

Based in Moscow for the last 27 years, Prodyut and Sumana run two Indian eateries, “Talk Of The Town” and “Fusion Plaza”.

You may like to read more on Indian cuisine: Indian ‘masala’, among other condiments spicing up global food palate.

Both restaurants serve popular Indian dishes like butter chicken, kebabs and a varied vegetarian spread.

During the ongoing FIFA World Cup 2018, there will be 25 per cent discount for those who will possess a Fan ID (required to watch World Cup games).

There will also be gifts and contests on offers during matches in both the restaurants to celebrate the event.

The Mukherjees, hailing from Kolkata, are die-hard fans of Argentina. Despite Albiceleste drawing 1-1 with Iceland in their group opener with Lionel Messi failing to sparkle, they believe Jorge Sampaoli’s team can go the distance.

“I am an Argentina fan. I have booked tickets for a quarterfinal match, a semifinal and of course the final. If Argentina goes on to lift

During the World Cup, there will be 25 per cent discount for those who will possess a Fan ID (required to watch World Cup games).

There will also be gifts and contests on offers during matches in both the restaurants to celebrate the event.

FIFA World Cup 2018 Russia
FIFA World Cup 2018, Wikimedia Commons.

“We have been waiting for this World Cup. Indians come in large numbers during the World Cup and we wanted these eateries to be a melting point,” he added.

According to Cutting Edge Events, FIFA’s official sales agency in India for the 2018 World Cup, India is amongst the top 10 countries in terms of number of match tickets bought.

Read more about Indian cuisine abroad: Hindoostane Coffee House: London’s First Indian Restaurant.

Prodyut came to Moscow to study engineering and later started working for a pharmaceutical company here before trying his hand in business. Besides running the two restaurants with the help of his wife, he was into the distribution of pharmaceutical products.

“After Russia won the first match of the World Cup, the footfall has gone up considerably. The Indians are also flooding in after the 6-9 p.m. game. That is the time both my restaurants remain full,” Prodyut said.

There are also plans to rope in registered fan clubs of Latin American countries, who will throng the restaurants during matches and then follow it up with after-game parties till the wee hours.

“I did get in touch with some of the fan clubs I had prior idea about. They agreed to come over and celebrate the games at our joints. Those will be gala nights when both eateries will remain open all night for them to enjoy,” Prodyut said.

Watching the World Cup is a dream come true for the couple, Sumana said.

“We want to make the Indians who have come here to witness the spectacle and feel at home too. We always extend a helping hand and since we are from West Bengal, we make special dishes for those who come from Bengal,” she added. (IANS)