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Aid suspended in Northern Nigeria by UN after the attack on Convoy

The U.N. children's agency, UNICEF, says an employee and a contractor were injured in the attack and are being treated at a local hospital.

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UNICEF suspended aid in Borno district. Image Source: www.vanguardngr.com
  • The U.N. children’s agency, UNICEF, says an employee and a contractor were injured in the attack and are being treated at a local hospital
  • The convoy was in Borno state, carrying humanitarian aid from the town of Bama to Maiduguri, in the heart of the area where the militant group Boko Haram operates
  • The charity Doctors Without Borders warned this week that more than 500,000 people in Borno state urgently need emergency assistance

The United Nations says it is suspending humanitarian assistance missions to Nigeria’s Borno state pending a security review, after an aid convoy was ambushed by unidentified attackers Thursday in northern Nigeria.

UNICEF suspended aid in Borno district. Image Source: www.un.org
UNICEF suspended aid in Borno district. Image Source: www.un.org

The U.N. children’s agency, UNICEF, says an employee and a contractor were injured in the attack and are being treated at a local hospital. It did not elaborate.

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The convoy was in Borno state, carrying humanitarian aid from the town of Bama to Maiduguri, in the heart of the area where the militant group Boko Haram operates. In a statement, UNICEF says the assistance was “desperately needed.”

“This was not only an attack on humanitarian workers. It is an attack on people who most need the assistance and aid that these workers were bringing,” the statement continued.

Boko Haram. Image Source: www.abc.net.au
Boko Haram. Image Source: www.abc.net.au

The charity Doctors Without Borders warned this week that more than 500,000 people in Borno state urgently need emergency assistance.

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It said 15,000 people in the town of Banki have been isolated by Boko Haram violence and depend entirely on humanitarian aid. A Doctors Without Borders representative said most Banki residents have been in hiding for more than a year because of Boko Haram violence.

Months of food shortages have resulted in a catastrophic health situation, with very high levels of malnutrition, particularly among small children.

Source: VoaNews

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UNICEF to Bring 11,000 Lower-Income South Africa High School Girls in Tech Industries

Women are woefully underrepresented in technology, science, engineering and mathematics jobs in South Africa

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UNICEF
Women are woefully underrepresented in technology, science, engineering and mathematics jobs in South Africa. But for the last decade, a homegrown, UNICEF-supported program has worked to bring 11,000 lower-income high school girls into these industries. VOA

Women are woefully underrepresented in technology, science, engineering and mathematics jobs in South Africa. But for the last decade, a homegrown, UNICEF-supported program has worked to bring 11,000 lower-income high school girls into these industries.

Among those students was Raquel Sorota. Sorota has come a long way from her humble upbringing in Johannesburg’s Tembisa township. She now works as a risk engineer at a top South African insurance company.

She was those one of those South African high school girls who went through the UNICEF-supported TechnoGirls program, which started in 2005. She was selected for the program in 2009. Now 24, she says it changed her life.

“My life has literally never been the same again,” she said. “So, before the program, I wanted to be a doctor and today I’m an engineer, through that program. So I think a lot of what I think I took from that program was how it exposed me to the world of engineering. I think for the longest time I never knew how broad that world was and that I could have a place in that world, most importantly.”

Bright, disadvantaged girls

The program selects bright high school girls from economically disadvantaged backgrounds, gives them exposure to professions in science, technology, engineering and math, pairs them with mentors, and follows them through their university studies.

The program’s founder, Staff Sithole, says this is about much more than creating a new crop of workers. This, she says, is about changing the world — and who runs it.

“It is more an instrument, or a program, which is contributing towards gender equality. So rather than just running advocacy programs, let’s come with something that can change the circumstances, can be a purposeful targeted intervention of contributing towards gender equality,” she said.

Challenging obstacles

For high school students Gugulethu Zungu and Queen Makaile, the obstacles are more than just lack of opportunity. Both are physically challenged; they were both born with different, rare genetic defects that have affected their appearance and their health. Both were chosen to participate in the program this year for their high grades in math and science.

Zungu says the program led her to identify her dream career — forensics — but also to expand her horizons.

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“I like investigating and solving mysteries. And it actually makes me believe that, indeed, nothing is impossible. You just have to think out of the box,” she said.

Makaile, who has struggled with hearing and vision problems as a result of her rare defect that has also given her asymmetrical facial features, says she now wants to be come a journalist, to show the world that her thoughts matter more than her looks. For these girls, nothing, they say, will stand in their way. (VOA)