Tuesday June 25, 2019

Alcohol-related liver cancer may have worse prognosis

Patients with alcohol-related liver cancer do not live as long as patients with liver cancer that is not associated with alcohol consumption, a new study suggests

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Cancer can be caused by excessive intake of sugar and carbohydrates too. Pixabay
  • Patients with alcohol-related cancer cannot live long
  • They live shorter than people with non-alcoholic liver cancer
  • Efforts should be made during screening  and treatment to reduce the harm

Patients with alcohol-related liver cancer do not live as long as patients with liver cancer that is not associated with alcohol consumption, a new study suggests.

The findings suggest that patients with alcohol-related liver cancer have a reduced overall survival time mainly due to worse liver function and tumour characteristics at diagnosis. Liver cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, with hepatitis B and C infections being the main causes.

Alcohol-related cancer patients survive less.

“To improve prognosis of liver cancer in the alcoholic population, efforts should be made to implement effective screening programmes for both cirrhosis and liver cancer, and to improve access to alcoholism treatment services,” said co-author Charlotte Costentin from the Hôpital Henri-Mondor in France.

To compare aspects of alcohol-related and non-alcohol-related liver cancer for the study, published in the journal Cancer, researchers examined 894 patients with newly diagnosed liver cancer who were followed for five years. As many as 582 patients had a history of chronic alcohol abuse and 312 did not. They also recorded whether patients with alcohol-related liver cancer were abstinent or not at the time of cancer diagnosis.

Also Read: Limit Alcohol Intake to cut Risk of Cancer, Say Experts

A total of 601 patients had died by the time of the investigator’s final analyses. Alcohol-related liver cancers were more likely to be diffuse and were detected in patients with worse liver function. Median overall survival was 9.7 versus 5.7 months in the non-alcohol-related and alcohol-related groups respectively.

When researchers looked at each stage of cancer individually, however, survival was similar in patients with non-alcohol related and alcohol related cancer. The findings indicate that efforts should be made to improve both screening for early signs of liver cancer and the management of alcohol abuse, the researcher said. IANS

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Poor Oral Health Associated with Liver Cancer: Study

“The liver contributes to the elimination of bacteria from the human body,” Jordao said

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A patient for a regular check up of their teeth.
Picture shows a person's teeth being checked upon.

Poor oral health is associated with a 75 per cent increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of liver cancer, a study suggests.

Published in the United European Gastroenterology Journal, the study investigated the association between oral health conditions and the risk of a number of gastrointestinal cancers, including liver, colon, rectum and pancreatic cancer.

Models were applied to estimate the relationship between cancer risk and self-reported oral health conditions, such as painful or bleeding gums, mouth ulcers and loose teeth.

“Poor oral health has been associated with the risk of several chronic diseases, such as heart disease, stroke and diabetes”, said the study lead author Haydee WT Jordao from Queen’s University Belfast.

According to the researchers, of the 469,628 participants from the UK, 4,069 developed gastrointestinal cancer during the (average) six-year follow up. In 13 per cent of these cases, patients reported poor oral health.

Cancer
Cancer Ribbon. Pixabay

Participants with poor oral health were more likely to be younger, female, living in deprived socio-economic areas and consumed less than two portions of fruit and vegetables per day.

The biological mechanisms by which poor oral health may be more strongly associated with liver cancer, rather than other digestive cancers, is currently uncertain. One explanation is the potential role of the oral and gut microbiome in disease development.

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“The liver contributes to the elimination of bacteria from the human body,” Jordao said.

“When the liver is affected by diseases, such as hepatitis, cirrhosis or cancer, its function will decline and bacteria will survive for longer and therefore have the potential to cause more harm,” he added. (IANS)