Friday January 18, 2019

Alcohol-related liver cancer may have worse prognosis

Patients with alcohol-related liver cancer do not live as long as patients with liver cancer that is not associated with alcohol consumption, a new study suggests

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Cancer can be caused by excessive intake of sugar and carbohydrates too. Pixabay
  • Patients with alcohol-related cancer cannot live long
  • They live shorter than people with non-alcoholic liver cancer
  • Efforts should be made during screening  and treatment to reduce the harm

Patients with alcohol-related liver cancer do not live as long as patients with liver cancer that is not associated with alcohol consumption, a new study suggests.

The findings suggest that patients with alcohol-related liver cancer have a reduced overall survival time mainly due to worse liver function and tumour characteristics at diagnosis. Liver cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, with hepatitis B and C infections being the main causes.

Alcohol-related cancer patients survive less.

“To improve prognosis of liver cancer in the alcoholic population, efforts should be made to implement effective screening programmes for both cirrhosis and liver cancer, and to improve access to alcoholism treatment services,” said co-author Charlotte Costentin from the Hôpital Henri-Mondor in France.

To compare aspects of alcohol-related and non-alcohol-related liver cancer for the study, published in the journal Cancer, researchers examined 894 patients with newly diagnosed liver cancer who were followed for five years. As many as 582 patients had a history of chronic alcohol abuse and 312 did not. They also recorded whether patients with alcohol-related liver cancer were abstinent or not at the time of cancer diagnosis.

Also Read: Limit Alcohol Intake to cut Risk of Cancer, Say Experts

A total of 601 patients had died by the time of the investigator’s final analyses. Alcohol-related liver cancers were more likely to be diffuse and were detected in patients with worse liver function. Median overall survival was 9.7 versus 5.7 months in the non-alcohol-related and alcohol-related groups respectively.

When researchers looked at each stage of cancer individually, however, survival was similar in patients with non-alcohol related and alcohol related cancer. The findings indicate that efforts should be made to improve both screening for early signs of liver cancer and the management of alcohol abuse, the researcher said. IANS

Next Story

Risk Of Suicide Quadruples With Cancer: Study

The results could be used to help identify patients who may be at a higher risk for suicide and help health care providers tailor their treatments accordingly.

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While the risk of suicide decreases five years after a diagnosis, the risk remains high for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma and testicular cancer.

People with cancer are over four times more likely to commit suicide than people without the deadly disease, finds a study.

According to researchers from the Penn State Cancer Institute in Pennsylvania, while a lot of progress has been made in treating cancer, not as much research has been put into how cancer affects patients mentally and emotionally.

“Even though cancer is one of the leading causes of death, most cancer patients do not die from cancer, the patients usually die of another cause,” said Nicholas Zaorsky, radiation oncologist at the Penn State Cancer Institute.

“There are multiple competing risks for death, and one of them is suicide. Distress and depression can arise from cancer diagnosis, treatment, financial stress, and other causes. Ultimately, distress and depression may lead to suicide. Our goal was to quantify the risk of suicide among cancer patients,” he added.

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The study, published in the Nature Communications journal, the team compared the risk of suicide in eight million patients who had been diagnosed with cancer and those without.

They found that among people with cancer, males, patients who were diagnosed at a younger age, patients with lung, head, neck and testicular cancer, and lymphomas were more likely to commit suicide.

While the risk of suicide decreases five years after a diagnosis, the risk remains high for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma and testicular cancer.

“Treatments for some cancers — like leukemia and testicular cancer among adolescents and young adults, for example — can decrease a patient’s fertility, and that seems to be one of the risks for suicide in the long term,” Zaorsky said.

Also Read: Here’s What Causes Cancer in Children

“In contrast, elderly patients who are diagnosed with lung, prostate and head and neck cancers, are at an increased risk of suicide for the remainder of their life.”

The results could be used to help identify patients who may be at a higher risk for suicide and help health care providers tailor their treatments accordingly. (IANS)