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All India Radio: 415 Stations, 23 Languages, 146 Dialects and counting

In 1936, the name All India Radio was coined and earlier it used to be referred as the Indian State Broadcasting Service

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Akashvani Bhavan, Kolkata. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
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August 24, 2016: President Pranab Mukherjee on Tuesday, August 23 launched the “Akashvani Maitree” Channel at a function organised at Raj Bhawan in Kolkata. The channel that was launched is a unique venture of All India Radio and is aimed at strengthening ties between India and Bangladesh.

Whole of Bangladesh and most of South East Asia will be covered through this channel. Apart from that, All India Radio has also come up with a multimedia website in Bangla airworldservice.org/bangla and it can be easily accessible through live streaming, text, and video. Apart from listeners in Bangladesh, it will also cater to Bengali Diaspora across the globe, reported IANS.

The progress of AIR reminds us of Walter Kaufmann, the man who composed the signature AIR tune in 1936. Walter was a Jewish refugee who found haven in India against the torture inflicted by Nazis on Jews. 1936 was also the year in which the name All India Radio coined, it used to be earlier referred as the Indian State Broadcasting Service. Since then the name was changed one more time to ‘Aakashwani’, which has been AIR’s official name since from 1956.

When India became Independent, it was in a dire need of a new language, a language that integrated the dialect of the people speaking different mother tongues. After all, India was a diverse nation that housed people of different communities speaking different languages. Ameen Sayani son of Kulsum Sayani, an 84-year-old woman who once played a significant role in the freedom movement, talks about the conversation she had with Mahatma Gandhi. “He said he wanted Hindustani — a blend of Hindi and Urdu, with no difficult words — to become the lingua franca of India. After Independence, it was a matter of pride to speak in Hindustani. More so, if you did it on AIR,” hence Hindustani was the language chosen.

Sayani was a veteran radio broadcaster and she joined in 1951. During her tenure, she tried popularizing songs from popular movies over Indian classical. This kind of music termed as ‘erotic and vulgar’ by then I&B minister who went ahead and put a ban on film music. It was then that Aruna Asaf Aliji came up to Sayani and said that she needed to do popular shows on AIR. When Sayani exclaimed that her hands were tied, Aruna spoke to Pt Nehru about this. Vividh Bharti, the commercial broadcast service of AIR, began in 1957 and Hindi film music returned to AIR.

All India Radio played a significant hand in promoting numerous arenas post-Indian Independence-

  • Most of the AIR audiences were people who were called the agrarian or the farmers. AIR was their only medium to promote agriculture since most of them were uneducated and lacked the skills to read or write. “We were talking directly to the farmers about modernisation, hybrid seeds etc. There were special agricultural advisory committees set up for the farmers. Which is why AIR played a big role in Green Revolution,” says F Sheheryar, director-general, All India Radio.
  • The chosen language, Hindustani was popularized through the radio. It had a definite influence on the language. This was the first mass medium and the nation began speaking like AIR. But also, there was some resistance from Tamil Nadu, who rejected Hindi in their schools and on radio,” says lyricist Swanand Kirkire.
  • Cricket owes its major chunk of popularity in India to AIR. Radio is where the cricket commentary started. “Initially, we wondered about the translation of cricket terms in Hindi. But the ball became ‘gend’ while googly remained, well, googly,” says BN Goel, former director of programme personnel, AIR.

Apart from that, PM Narendra Modi also appreciates the reach and importance of AIR. His periodic talk on the radio speaks volumes about his belief on how important is radio broadcasting as a medium.

– prepared by NewsGram team

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AI Helps Find Source Of Radio Bursts 3 Billion Light Years Away From Earth

The researchers developed the new, powerful machine-learning algorithm and reanalysed the 2017 data, finding an additional 72 bursts not detected originally.

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Space, radio
'AI helps track down mysterious cosmic signals', Pixabay

Scientists say they have used artificial intelligence (AI) to discover 72 new fast radio bursts from a mysterious source about three billion light years away from Earth.

The initiative may advance the search to find signs of intelligent life in the universe, said researchers from the University of California, Berkeley in the US.

Fast radio bursts are bright pulses of radio emission mere milliseconds in duration, thought to originate from distant galaxies.

However, the source of these emissions is still unclear, according to the research published in The Astrophysical Journal.

Theories range from highly magnetised neutron stars blasted by gas streams from a nearby supermassive black hole, to suggestions that the burst properties are consistent with signatures of technology developed by an advanced civilization.

 

earth, radio
While most fast radio bursts are one-offs, the source here, FRB 121102, is unique in emitting repeated bursts. Wikimedia Commons

 

“This work is exciting not just because it helps us understand the dynamic behaviour of fast radio bursts in more detail, but also because of the promise it shows for using machine learning to detect signals missed by classical algorithms,” said Andrew Siemion from the University of California – Berkele.

 

Researchers are also applying the successful machine-learning algorithm to find new kinds of signals that could be coming from extraterrestrial civilisations.

While most fast radio bursts are one-offs, the source here, FRB 121102, is unique in emitting repeated bursts.

This behaviour has drawn the attention of many astronomers hoping to pin down the cause and the extreme physics involved in fast radio bursts.

The AI algorithms dredged up the radio signals from data were recorded over a five-hour period in 2017, by the Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia in the US.

Radio
The researchers developed the new, powerful machine-learning algorithm and reanalysed the 2017 data, finding an additional 72 bursts not detected originally. (IANS)

An earlier analysis of the 400 terabytes of data employed standard computer algorithms to identify 21 bursts during that period.

“All were seen within one hour, suggesting that the source alternates between periods of quiescence and frenzied activity,” said Berkeley postdoctoral researcher Vishal Gajjar.

Also Read: HCL Launches AI Based ‘HCL Turbo’

The researchers developed the new, powerful machine-learning algorithm and reanalysed the 2017 data, finding an additional 72 bursts not detected originally.

This brings the total number of detected bursts from FRB 121102 to around 300 since it was discovered in 2012, researchers said. (IANS)