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An Indian Sikh organises Exhibition of Sacred Trees Images in Pakistan

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The Golden Temple (Representational image). Pixabay

Lahore, November 27, 2016: An Indian Sikh, for the first time, has held an exhibition at Guru Nanak’s birthplace and displayed the images of sacred trees in Sikhism. Many are unaware that after these sacred trees, almost 60 Gurudwaras have been named in India as well as in Pakistan.

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The exhibition has been put up in the birthplace of Guru Nanak, the founder of the Sikh religion, in the main parikrama of the Nankana Sahib Gurudwara.
Last Friday, The exhibition, inaugurated by retired Indian IAS officer DS Jaspal, comprises 21 panels.

Each of the panel has an image of the sacred tree from the Jaspal’s book ‘Tryst with Trees’, along with a brief description of its features, its health status, and also the historical and religious background of the shrine in relation to the tree.

According to PTI, “Prominent Sikhs, including members of the Pakistan Sigh Gurdwara Parbhandik Committee, attended the inauguration ceremony.”

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On this occasion, Khalid Ali, the Additional Secretary, Evacuee Property Trust Board Pakistan, said, the exhibition “sends a strong message not only for peace and religious harmony but also for nature and environment and, in particular, of the relevance of religion in promoting conservation efforts.”

He complimented Jaspal’s pioneering research in documenting, with beautiful photographs, and sacred Sikh shrines in India as well as in Pakistan which are named after trees. Khalid further added that the exhibition will be of interest not only to the Sikhs, but also to all nature lovers.

In a pictorial book, Jaspal documented with photographs of 58 sacred Sikh shrines in India and Pakistan which are named after trees, rather 19 species of trees.

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Jaspal, has held exhibitions in Washington, New York, Oslo, Chandigarh, Delhi, and Lahore travelled extensively in India and in Pakistan for over a period of three years in order to compile the material and the photographs for the book.

by NewsGram team with PTI inputs

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Sikh Man Wears Rainbow Turban for Pride Month

Pride Month kicked off on June 1 and honours the LGBTQ community while commemorating New York's Stonewall riots in June 1969

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Pride Month kicked off on June 1 and honours the LGBTQ community while commemorating New York's Stonewall riots in June 1969. Pixabay

Jiwandeep Kohli, a San Diego-based neuroscientist who is bisexual and a Sikh, is ringing in this years Pride Month with a rainbow turban that has gone viral on social media.

Sharing an image of the elaborate creation on Twitter that has received nearly 30,000 likes, Kohli, who was also a former contestant on “The Great American Baking Show”, celebrated what makes him unique, reports The Huffington Post.

“I’m proud to be a bisexual bearded baking brain scientist,” he captioned the image. “I feel fortunate to be able to express all these aspects of my identity and will continue to work towards ensuring the same freedom for others.”

Pride Month kicked off on June 1 and honours the LGBTQ community while commemorating New York’s Stonewall riots in June 1969 that signalled a turning point in the movement for equal rights.

Sikh, Man, Rainbow, Turban
Jiwandeep Kohli, a San Diego-based neuroscientist who is bisexual and a Sikh, is ringing in this years Pride Month. Pixabay

In an interview to Buzzfeed News, Kohli said: “A few years ago I saw a photo of another Sikh man at a pride parade who had a few colours in his turban.

“I was looking at that and I realized the way I tie mine, it had the exact right number of layers to make a rainbow.”

He wore his rainbow turban to the San Diego Pride last year, but reshared it on Twitter for this year’s Pride Month.

There were a few people asking where they can get their own rainbow turban. Kohli in response, said he wanted them to know that turbans were a responsibility for Sikhs and it’s not the same as throwing on a rainbow hat.

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“I wouldn’t want people to have the impression that I’m just wearing it as an accessory,” he said. “A turban is a sign to the world that you’re a person the world can turn to for help.”

Kohli also runs a website called “Bearded Baker Co”, where he showcases his culinary prowess along with recipes for those who want to give his food a try. (IANS)