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Another Noose found, this time at African-American Museum which represents extreme violence for the Community

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National Museum of African-American History and Culture. VOA
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Washington, June 1, 2017: A noose was found inside the National Museum of African-American History and Culture in here, the second time in less than a week after a noose was left at one of the Smithsonian museums.

“The noose has long represented a deplorable act of cowardice and depravity — a symbol of extreme violence for African-Americans,” museum director Lonnie Bunch said on Wednesday.

“Today’s (Wednesday) incident is a painful reminder of the challenges that African Americans continue to face…We will continue to help bridge the chasm of race that has divided this nation since its inception,” said Bunch.

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The US Park Police were called to the museum and the noose, which had been found in an exhibition on segregation, was quickly removed afterwards, Xinhua news agency reported.

On May 26, a noose was found hanging from a tree outside the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, also on the National Mall.

The two incidents are now under investigation. (IANS)

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  • vedika kakar

    I think the investigation should first commence before us labeling it as a racial slur. Probably the mischief of some college kids who did not understand the historic significance of this move. It might also be a move for solidarity by someone in a way we are failing to understand. It is too quick right now to label it as a hate crime.

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USA: Everything you want to know about Security Clearance; Find out here!

A security clearance allows a person access to classified national security information or restricted areas.

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Former CIA Director John O. Brennan speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, March 11, 2014. President Donald Trump revoked Brennan's security clearance Wednesday. VOA
Former CIA Director John O. Brennan speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, March 11, 2014. President Donald Trump revoked Brennan's security clearance Wednesday. VOA

U.S. President Donald Trump on Wednesday revoked the security clearance of former CIA Director John Brennan. We take a look at what that means.

What is a security clearance?

A security clearance allows a person access to classified national security information or restricted areas after completion of a background check. The clearance by itself does not guarantee unlimited access. The agency seeking the clearance must determine what specific area of information the person needs to access.

What are the different levels of security clearance?

There are three levels: Confidential, secret and top secret. Security clearances don’t expire. But, top secret clearances are reinvestigated every five years, secret clearances every 10 years and confidential clearances every 15 years.

All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance. VOA
All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance. VOA

Who has security clearances?

According to a Government Accountability Office report released last year, about 4.2 million people had a security clearance as of 2015, they included military personnel, civil servants, and government contractors.

Why does one need a security clearance in retirement?

Retired senior intelligence officials and military officers need their security clearances in case they are called to consult on sensitive issues.

Also Read: Governments Across The World Request Apple for 30,000 Device Information

Can the president revoke a security clearance?

Apparently. But there is no precedent for a president revoking someone’s security clearance. A security clearance is usually revoked by the agency that sought it for an employee or contractor. All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance, which can include criminal acts, lack of allegiance to the United States, behavior or situation that could compromise an individual and security violations. (VOA)