Thursday November 14, 2019

Anupam Kher Encourages People To Overcome Depression

There is still a taboo associated with depression

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Anupam Kher
History will not misjudge Manmohan Singh: Anupam. Flickr

Actor Anupam Kher says depression is still considered to be a taboo, and he hopes to bring a change by doing his bit.

The actor has released a video on YouTube encouraging people to overcome depression and not shy away from coming out in the open about the issue.

“There is still a taboo associated with depression. People shy away from coming out in the open and discussing it. This even affects not just the victim but their near and dear one’s too,” Anupam said in a statement to IANS.

“A day before my father passed away, he gave me the message of living life to the fullest and that’s what I hope to encourage people to do with this video,” he added.

The actor will soon be honoured with the Outstanding Achievement in Indian Cinema Award at the 19th edition of the International Indian Film Academy (IIFA) Awards to be held in Bangkok later this month.

depression
depression, Pixabay

Anupam, who has starred in over 500 films including international films, started his career in 1984 with “Saaransh”.

Over his three-decade long journey in Hindi filmdom, he has also appeared in many acclaimed international films such as the Golden Globe nominated “Bend It Like Beckham”, Ang Lee’s Golden Lion-winning “Lust”, and David O. Russell’s Oscar-winning “Silver Linings Playbook”.

Also read: Depression, Anxiety May Lead to Teeth Loss

He has also been honoured with the Padma Shri in 2004 and the Padma Bhushan in 2016 for his contribution in the field of cinema and arts. (IANS)

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Study Says, Youth with Abnormal Heart Rythms are More Likely to Have Mental Health Issues

The study is scheduled to be presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2019 -- November 16-18 in Philadelphia, US

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Heart Rythms
Researchers reviewed data on more than 7,300 children with abnormal Heart Rhthms and compared them to children with congenital heart disease, cystic fibrosis, sickle cell disease and children with none of these chronic conditions (controls). Pixabay

Children and teenagers with abnormal Heart Rythms (cardiac arrhythmias) are more likely to have depression, anxiety and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as compared to those of similar ages without chronic medical conditions, researchers have warned.

“This may be the first study of this size looking at children and teenagers with various cardiac arrhythmias that have been diagnosed with or are taking medication for anxiety and depression,” said study’s lead author Keila N. Lopez from Baylor College of Medicine in the US.

Higher rates of depression, anxiety and ADHD have previously been described in young adults born with structural heart defects (congenital heart disease).

For the study, the researchers analysed the records of more than a quarter of a million children admitted to or seen in the emergency room of Texas Children’s Hospital between 2011 and 2016.

They reviewed data on more than 7,300 children with abnormal heart rhythms and compared them to children with congenital heart disease, cystic fibrosis, sickle cell disease and children with none of these chronic conditions (controls).

“We chose cystic fibrosis and sickle cell disease because they are chronic diseases that are managed with medications and usually involve multiple hospitalisations,” Lopez said.

They found more than 20 per cent of kids with abnormal heart rhythms, congenital heart disease and cystic fibrosis had been diagnosed with or prescribed medication for depression and/or anxiety, compared with five per cent of children with sickle cell disease and three per cent of the control group.

Heart Rythms
Children and teenagers with abnormal Heart Rythms (cardiac arrhythmias) are more likely to have depression, anxiety and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as compared to those of similar ages without chronic medical condition. Pixabay

Kids with abnormal heart rhythms were nine times more likely to be diagnosed or treated for anxiety and depression and almost five times more likely to be diagnosed or treated for ADHD, compared to kids without any of the identified chronic diseases in the study.

Kids with abnormal heart rhythms were one and a half times as likely to be diagnosed or treated for anxiety and depression than those with cystic fibrosis, and more than five times as likely to be diagnosed or treated for anxiety and depression than those with sickle cell disease, the study said.

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The study is scheduled to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2019 — November 16-18 in Philadelphia, US. (IANS)