Wednesday November 13, 2019

Anxiety Linked to Kicking, Yelling During Sleep

Identifying lifestyle and personal risk factors linked to this sleep disorder may lead to finding ways to reduce the chances of developing it, the team noted

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Probiotics Not Effective in Reducing Anxiety: Study
Anxiety linked to kicking, yelling during sleep as well. Pixabay

Taking anti-depressants or having post-traumatic stress disorder or anxiety are risk factors for a disruptive and sometimes violent sleep disorder called rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder, says a study.

REM sleep is the dream state of sleep. A person may act out violent by yelling, flailing their arms, punching or kicking, to the point of harming themselves or a sleep partner.

During normal REM sleep, your brain sends signals to prevent your muscles from moving.

However, for people with REM sleep behavior disorder, those signals are disrupted.

“While much is still unknown about REM sleep behaviour disorder, it can be caused by medications or it may be an early sign of another neurologic condition like Parkinson’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies or multiple system atrophy,” said study author Ronald Postuma at the McGill University in Canada.

For the study, the researchers looked at 30,097 people with an average age of 63.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

They identified 958 people, or 3.2 per cent with possible REM sleep behaviour disorder, after excluding participants with Parkinson’s disease, dementia, Alzheimer’s disease or sleep apnea.

In addition, findings, published in journal Neurology showed that 13 per cent of those with the disorder taking anti-depressants to treat depression compared to 6 per cent without the disorder.

People with the disorder were also two-and-a-half times as likely to have post-traumatic stress disorder and twice as likely to have mental illness, findings showed.

Other findings were that men were twice as likely as women to have possible REM sleep behaviour disorder.

Also Read- Women Having Slim Hips Could Be At Risk of Developing Diabetes, Heart Attacks

People with possible REM sleep behaviour disorder were 25 per cent more likely to be moderate to heavy drinkers than those without the disorder.

“Our hope is that our findings will help guide future research, especially because REM sleep behaviour disorder is such a strong sign of future neuro-degenerative disease,” said Postuma.

Identifying lifestyle and personal risk factors linked to this sleep disorder may lead to finding ways to reduce the chances of developing it, the team noted. (IANS)

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Anxiety Among Teenagers Leads To Harmful Drinking

Generalized anxiety disorder among teenagers can lead to harmful drinking

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Anxiety among teenagers is associated with harmful drinking. Pixabay

Researchers at the University of Bristol have found evidence of an association between generalised anxiety disorder at age 18 and harmful drinking three years later.

The study, published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence strengthens the evidence for a relationship between anxiety and later alcohol use as the researchers accounted for other factors such as adolescent smoking and cannabis use, and parental anxiety and alcohol use.

“Helping adolescents to develop positive strategies for coping with anxiety, instead of drinking alcohol, may reduce the risk of future harmful drinking. However, we cannot determine if the relationship is causal, because we used an observational study design,” said Maddy Dyer.

Using questionnaire and clinical interview data from more than 2,000 participants, researchers found generalised anxiety disorder at age 18 was linked to frequent drinking, frequent bingeing, hazardous drinking, and harmful drinking at age 18.

Generalised anxiety disorder continued to be associated with harmful drinking at age 21.

Drinking to cope was also strongly associated with more harmful drinking, but it did not appear to influence associations between anxiety and alcohol use.

Harmful drinking was measured using a special test developed by the World Health Association.

Anxiety disorder
Adolescents with anxiety drink at more harmful levels regardless of whether they tended to drink alcohol for coping reasons or not. Pixabay

On average, adolescents with anxiety drank at more harmful levels regardless of whether they tended to drink alcohol for coping reasons or not.

“Our own research has shown that links between mental health problems, such as anxiety disorders, and alcohol are common and complex,” said Mark Leyshon, Senior Policy and Research Manager at Alcohol Change UK.

For example, anxiety can be both a result of stopping drinking and a risk factor in beginning to drink too much, as this new study suggests.

Also Read- Study Says, Multitasking can take Teenagers to both Positive and Negative Approach

“We need more research to help us better understand the connections between alcohol and mental health, as well as high-quality, accessible, integrated support for substance misuse and mental health issues,” Leyshon added. (IANS)