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Apology from Rio 2016: Amazon Jaguar Shot dead at Olympic Torch Ceremony

The jaguar was earlier tranquilized and was killed by a single gunshot from a soldier after it escaped from handlers

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Brazilian Jaguar shot dead in Rio Olympics 2016. Image source: Brazilian Army
  • A tranquilized jaguar was utilized in an Olympic Torch Ceremony on Tuesday, June 21
  • The jaguar was shot dead by a soldier to save his life after it escaped from handlers
  • The jaguar is an endangered species in the Americas

Rio 2016 organizers issued an apology on Tuesday, June 21, after a jaguar that featured in an Olympic torch ceremony was shot dead in the Amazonian city of Manaus.

The jaguar, which had earlier been tranquilized, was killed by a single gun shot from a soldier after it escaped from handlers, the Brazilian army said in a statement.

The army said the soldier had been forced to shoot the animal to protect himself from being mauled, Xinhua reported.

“We made a mistake in permitting the Olympic torch, a symbol of peace and unity, to be exhibited alongside a chained wild animal,” Rio 2016 said in a statement.

“This image goes against our beliefs and our values. We guarantee that there will be no more such incidents at Rio 2016.”

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Brazilian mascot, Ginga. Image courtesy: Wikimedia commons

The jaguar, named Juma, was the real-life version of Brazil’s Olympic team toy mascot, known as Ginga.

Animal rights groups questioned why Juma was used in the ceremony. Moments before being fatally wounded, the animal featured in photographs alongside the Olympic torch while shackled by chains.

“When will people (and institutions) stop with this sick need to show power and control by confining, taming and showcasing wild animals?” Brazilian animal rights group Animal Freedom Union said on Facebook.

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According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature, the jaguar is an endangered species in the Americas. It’s population has fallen by 30 per cent since the mid-1980s.

Ipaam, Brazil’s Amazonas state environmental authority, said it had launched an investigation in the incident.

“No request was made to authorize the participation of the jaguar ‘Juma’ in the event of the Olympic torch,” Ipaam said in a statement.

-prepared by Saurabh Bodas (with inputs from IANS), an intern at NewsGram. Twitter: @saurabhbodas96

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Coronavirus Pandemic: A Punishment for Humans?

Humans have caused irreparable damage to earth over the span of millions of year

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The world has seen many pandemics in the past before Coronavirus pandemic. Pixabay

By Muskan Bhatnagar

It’s been over 6 months since the Coronavirus outbreak and the world is still fighting against it. Coronavirus Worldometer suggests a total of 4,907,135 cases so far, including cases that resulted in deaths and the ones recovered. This is not the first time that the world is going through a pandemic and crisis. Humans saw the Spanish Flu back in 1918, the spread of HIV in 1981, and the most recent one in 2009, H1N1 Swine flu. These pandemics killed millions of people across the globe, just like COVID-19

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It’s not even been 6 months into this year and the world has already the worst of times. But the question is- who is responsible for all this? The answer is crystal clear. It is us, the human race.

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Humans have caused a lot of damage to the planet with activities like deforestation. Pixabay

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Bronx Zoo announced that their four-year-old Malayan tiger Nadia had tested positive for coronavirus. Pixabay

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“The Zoo: COVID-19 And Animals” will premiere on May 17 on Animal Planet, Animal Planet HD and Discovery Plus app. Wikimedia Commons

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