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Apple Pay now allows Secure and Instant Donations to Non-Profit Organisations with just a Touch!

Apple Pay support for charitable donations kicked off on Tuesday with nonprofits ranging from global organisations such as Unicef and WWF

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San Francisco, Nov 15, 2016: In a bid to help charity organisations get seamless donations, Apple Pay has made it easier and secure to donate to non-profit organisations with just a touch.

Apple Pay support for charitable donations kicked off on Tuesday with nonprofits ranging from global organisations such as Unicef and WWF.

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“We’re making it incredibly easy to give back with Apple Pay,” said Apple Pay’s Vice President Jennifer Bailey.

“We think offering such a simple and secure way to support the incredible work nonprofits will have a significant impact on the communities they serve,” Bailey added.

More nonprofits will offer Apple Pay over the coming months so their supporters can make easy, secure and private payments, the Cupertino-based company said in a statement.

“We are thrilled that more people will help WWF tackle urgent conservation issues this holiday season and beyond with their donations via Apple Pay,” said Senior Vice President Terry Macko of Marketing and Communications, WWF.

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David Miliband, President and CEO, International Rescue Committee, said: “Apple Pay gives supporters an easier way to help achieve our mission of helping the world’s most vulnerable people.”

In the few seconds it takes to use Apple Pay to donate, you can help save a child from hunger and disease or give them clean water to drink, added Caryl M. Stern, CEO and president, the US Fund for Unicef. (IANS)

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Millions Of Urban Children in Worse Condition Than Rural People: UNICEF

ICLEI, a global network of more than 1,500 cities, towns and regions, said disasters were more likely to impact the most vulnerable in cities, including children.

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Urban CHildren
A girl sells candies along a street in the Miraflores district in Lima. VOA

Millions of poor urban children are more likely to die before their fifth birthday than those living in rural areas, according to a U.N. study released Tuesday that challenges popular assumptions behind the global urbanization trend.

The UNICEF research found not all children in cities benefited from the so-called urban advantage — the idea that higher incomes, better infrastructure and proximity to services make for better lives.

“For rural parents, at face-value, the reasons to migrate to cities seem obvious: better access to jobs, health care and education opportunities for their children,” said Laurence Chandy, UNICEF director of data, research and policy.

urban children
Children play in a pool that has no system to replace the water in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Aug. 13, 2015. Brazil is among the world’s largest economies, but lags in access to water and sanitation. Rapid urban growth in recent decades, poor planning, political infighting and economic instability are largely to blame, experts say. VOA

“But not all urban children are benefiting equally; we find evidence of millions of children in urban areas who fare worse than their rural peers.”

Although most urban children benefit from living in cities, the study identified 4.3 million globally who were more likely to die before age five than their rural counterparts, and said 13.4 million were less likely to complete primary school.

“Children should be a focus of urban planning, yet in many cities they are forgotten, with millions of children cut off from social services in urban slums and informal settlements,” said Chandy in a statement.

Urban Children
A mother seeking entry into the United States with her children in McAllen, Texas. VOA

About 1 billion people are estimated to live in slums globally, hundreds of millions of them children, according to the U.N. children’s agency.

A decade ago, the world officially became majority urban, and two-thirds of the global population is expected to live in urban areas by 2050, according to the United Nations.

“We applaud UNICEF for putting numbers around a problem that will only get more serious as more and more families move to cities,” said Patrin Watanatada of the Bernard van Leer Foundation, which works to promote early childhood development. “Cities can be wonderful places to grow up, rich with opportunities — but they can also pose serious challenges for a child’s healthy development.”

 Urban children
New campaign to limit children’s calories to 200 per day. wikimedia commons

Poor transport links, limited access to health clinics and parks, as well as growing air pollution and stressed caregivers can exacerbate city living for children, said Watanatada.

Improved walking and cycling infrastructure, affordable housing and transportation, and polices targeted at supporting children and those who care for them could help ease life for urban families.

Also Read: Ebola Increases The Number Of Orphans in DRC: UNICEF

ICLEI, a global network of more than 1,500 cities, towns and regions, said disasters were more likely to impact the most vulnerable in cities, including children.

“Children are disproportionately affected by gaps in urban services, especially when it comes to water, sanitation, air quality, and food security,” said Yunus Arikan, head of global policy and advocacy at ICLEI. (VOA)