Wednesday November 20, 2019
Home Science & Technology Astronomers D...

Astronomers Discover First Binary-Binary Solar System HD 87646, has Primary Star 12 Percent more massive than Sun

The primary star of the new binary system HD 87646 is twelve percent more massive than our Sun

0
//
Representational Image, Wikimedia

October 20, 2016: Everything that we have known about the formation of our solar system might be wrong, says University of Florida astronomy professor Jian Ge and his postdoc, Bo Ma. Astronomers have discovered a binary-binary solar system.

This discovered solar system, i.e. two mighty companions revolving around one star in close binary. The  binary system is said to have been named HD 87646, mentioned Science Daily.

The Binary system has one ” giant planet” which is called the MARVELS-7a, and a dwarf planet called the MARVELS-7b. The MARVELS- 7a is 12 times the mass of Jupiter while MARVELS-7b is 57 times the mass of Jupiter.

[bctt tweet=”The primary star of the new binary system HD 87646 is twelve percent more massive than our Sun. ” username=””]

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

According to the Science Daily report, astronomers believed that the planets in our solar system have evolved from a collapsed disk dust cloud, with the larger planet in the system move far away from our primary star.

In the new binary HD 87646, astronomers have noticed that these large companions are in close proximity to the primary star, which means that they have collected way more dust and gas than a particular disk dust cloud can provide. It is probable that they are formed  through some other mechanism.

The primary star of the new binary system HD 87646 is twelve percent more massive than our Sun. The secondary star is ten percent less massive than our Sun, yet the two planets have only 22 astronomical units of distance between them, which is equivalent to the distance between our Sun and Uranus. In spite of the close proximity between the two massive bodies, the stability of the system raises a question on how the protoplanetary disks are formed.

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

The planet-hunting Doppler instrument W.M. Keck Exoplanet Tracker, or KeckET, which was developed by a team led by Ge at the Sloan Digital Sky Survey telescope at Apache Point Observatory in New Mexico, is atypical that it can simultaneously observe dozens of celestial bodies.

-Prepared by Enakshi Roy Chowdhury of Newsgram. Twitter: @enakshirc58

Next Story

US Researchers Redefine Conditions that Makes a Planet Habitable

The researchers also found that planets with thin ozone layers, which have otherwise habitable surface temperatures, receive dangerous levels of UV dosages

0
Planet
Instruments, such as the Hubble Space Telescope and James Webb Space Telescope, have the capability to detect water vapor and ozone on a Planet. Pixabay

A team of US researchers has redefined the conditions that make a Planet habitable by taking the star’s radiation and the planet’s rotation rate into account – a discovery that will help astronomers narrow down the search around life-sustaining planets.

The research team is the first to combine 3D climate modeling with atmospheric chemistry to explore the habitability of planets around M dwarf stars, which comprise about 70 per cent of the total galactic population.

Among its findings, the Northwestern team, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder, NASA’s Virtual Planet Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, discovered that only planets orbiting active stars — those that emit a lot of ultraviolet (UV) radiation — lose significant water to vaporization.

Planets around inactive, or quiet, stars are more likely to maintain life-sustaining liquid water.

The researchers also found that planets with thin ozone layers, which have otherwise habitable surface temperatures, receive dangerous levels of UV dosages, making them hazardous for complex surface life.

“It’s only in recent years that we have had the modeling tools and observational technology to address this question,” said Northwestern’s Howard Chen, the study’s first author.

“Still, there are a lot of stars and planets out there, which means there are a lot of targets,” added Daniel Horton, senior author of the study. “Our study can help limit the number of places we have to point our telescopes”.

The research was published in the Astrophysical Journal.

Horton and Chen are looking beyond our solar system to pinpoint the habitable zones within M dwarf stellar systems.

M dwarf planets have emerged as frontrunners in the search for habitable planets.

Planet
A team of US researchers has redefined the conditions that make a Planet habitable by taking the star’s radiation and the planet’s rotation rate into account. Pixabay

They get their name from the small, cool, dim stars around which they orbit, called M dwarfs or “red dwarfs”.

By coupling 3D climate modeling with photochemistry and atmospheric chemistry, Horton and Chen constructed a more complete picture of how a star’s UV radiation interacts with gases, including water vapor and ozone, in the planet’s atmosphere.

Instruments, such as the Hubble Space Telescope and James Webb Space Telescope, have the capability to detect water vapor and ozone on exoplanets. They just need to know where to look.

ALSO READ: Fitbit to Unveil Latest Update for its Smartwatch

“‘Are we alone?’ is one of the biggest unanswered questions,” Chen said. “If we can predict which planets are most likely to host life, then we might get that much closer to answering it within our lifetimes.” (IANS)