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Balochistan Violence: 13-year-old boy dies after Hindu man arrested for ‘Blasphemy’ charges in Pakistan

Blasphemy, which carries the death penalty, is a sensitive issue in Pakistan, with allegations often prompting mob violence

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FILE -(representational image) Pakistani villagers living at the Line of Control between Pakistan-Indian Kashmir, Chakoti, build concrete house in Pakistan, Nov. 21, 2016. VOA
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Balochistan, May 4, 2017: A 13-year-old boy died in aerial firing by police on Thursday after an angry mob in Pakistan’s Balochistan demanded they hand over a Hindu man arrested on blasphemy charges.

Prakash Kumar, 35, was arrested from Hub on Wednesday after locals complained he allegedly sent blasphemous content via WhatsApp, police was quoted as saying by local media.

Police said they had lodged a case against the accused while a cellphone, from which the suspect allegedly shared blasphemous content, has been seized. A local court has sent the suspect to jail for further interrogation in the case.

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A mob soon gathered outside the Hub city police station demanding that Kumar be handed over to them so they could “punish” him. When law enforcement refused, the crowd turned violent.

The police managed to disperse the crowd using tear gas shelling and aerial firing, and also took scores of protesters into custody.

According to police, a teenager died in the violence. The boy was a resident of Pathan Colony and became a victim of aerial firing during the clash which took place near Gaddani bus stop in Hub.

Blasphemy, which carries the death penalty, is a sensitive issue in Pakistan, with allegations often prompting mob violence.

Vigilantes have murdered 65 people over blasphemy allegations since 1990, according to research compiled by the Centre for Research and Security Studies think-tank. (IANS)

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Quoting WhatsApp message renders ‘delete’ feature ineffective

"Relying on third-party apps, users could browse the notification log to read purged texts," the report said

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  • If you don’t like the delete for everyone feature on WhatsApp here is the trick for you
  • If you quote someone message then the delete for everyone option becomes ineffective
  • It is also possible to recover deleted messages

If someone has quoted your message on WhatsApp before you delete it, you will still be able to see that message — rendering the ‘Delete for Everyone’ feature ineffective, a media report said.

Last year, WhatsApp rolled out this feature to allow its over one billion user base to revoke messages in case they sent those to a wrong person or a group.

Users can now stop the delete for everyone option. Pexels
Users can now stop the delete for everyone option. Pexels

Users can only delete messages for everyone for up to seven minutes after sending.

However, tech website The Next Web reported that quoted messages in chats continued to show in quotes even after they were wiped.

It said that this is not a bug and is a part of the the feature.

If a user sends a message and deletes it from a group or individual chat within seven minutes, the message will disappear.

Also Read: ‘WhatsApp Business’ Now Available On Android In India

However, if within these seven minutes, that message is quoted then the original message will successfully disappear but the deleted text continues to show in the recipient’s quote.

Interestingly, there is no mention of how the feature works in cases of quotes in the WhatsApp’s FAQ.

This comes following the reports in which researchers claimed to discover other shortcomings in WhatsApp’s implementation of deleted messages.

Users can now also recover deleted messages. Pixabay
Users can now also recover deleted messages. Pixabay

In one particular flaw — discovered by Spanish tech blog AndroidJefe — it was possible to recover deleted messages from the Android notification history.

“Relying on third-party apps, users could browse the notification log to read purged texts,” the report said.

The Independent later pointed out that this approach could only recover deleted messages that were read or interacted with.