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Be Positive For Better Learning, Good Sleep

A range of employability skills such as teamwork, problem solving and planning were also associated with greater happiness in students, said the study

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Be Positive For Better Learning, Good Sleep
Be Positive For Better Learning, Good Sleep. Pixabay
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Young people with a positive outlook, self-belief and skills for the workplace are happier, sleep better and are better behaved, says a new study.

According to researchers from Britain-based Assessment and Development Consultants (A&DC) and ThinkForward, a non-profit organisation, positive attitudes such as self-belief, aspiration, flexibility and appetite for learning were associated with less hyperactivity, fewer emotional problems, fewer problems with fellow pupils and greater inclination to help others.

“Pupils with this positive mindset were also happier and slept better,” said Ali Shalfrooshan from A&DC.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

The research saw more than 270 students from 12 secondary schools completing questionnaires relating to their attitudes towards helping others, attitudes to school, behavioural problems and sleeping difficulties.

These questionnaires were used to inform targeted coaching to develop and enhance the employability skills of young people, said Louise Brown from ThinkForward in a study reported by the British Psychological Society.

Also Read: Smoking Affects Good Night’s Sleep Too

A range of employability skills such as teamwork, problem solving and planning were also associated with greater happiness in students, said the study.

Shalfrooshan and his team suggested that coaching young people would enable them to thrive during challenging economic times and be more capable of achieving their aspirations. (IANS)

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Being Positive During Pregnancy May Lead to Kids Being in Shape: Study

For the study, the researchers analysed responses from 7,000 parents about their personality, mood and attitude during pregnancy

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The risk for children with mothers in the grade III obesity category was 82 per cent. Pixabay

Did you know even your mood and attitude during pregnancy can have an effect on the body weight of your children when they grow up? A new study has found that teenagers are less likely to be overweight if their mother or father had a positive attitude during pregnancy.

Negative attitude, or a lack of self-belief in your ability to bring in changes to your lifestyle through your actions, may be associated with unhealthy weight gain in your children during teenage years, suggests the study published in the International Journal of Obesity.

“We’ve been able to show that a lack of self-belief in a parent’s ability to influence change by healthy eating, stopping smoking or breast feeding is a contributing factor to their child being overweight by the time they are 15,” said lead study author Jean Golding, Professor at University of Bristol in Britain.

For the study, the researchers analysed responses from 7,000 parents about their personality, mood and attitude during pregnancy.

Similar answers from their children at age of eight and the child’s fat mass measurement up to the age of 17 were also analysed.

Pregnant woman
Pregnant woman. Pixabay

The results showed that a mother’s psychological background during pregnancy is a factor associated with teenage weight gain.

The study examined a personality attribute known as the Locus of Control. It is a psychological measure for an individual’s attitudes towards their lifestyle and a belief in being able to change outcomes, such as health, through their own actions.

Someone with an external Locus of Control would feel that there is little point in making an effort as what happens to them is due to luck and circumstance.

Also Read: thyroid Dysfunction May Lead to Diabetes During Pregnancy

The researchers found that teenagers at age 15 had an excess weight of actual fat to the extent of 1.7 kg if their mothers did not think their actions would make a difference and held a laissez-faire attitude.

If their fathers had this attitude the excess weight of fat was 1.49 kg and if the child later thought this way the excess was 1.5 kg, the study said.

“This is important research for health campaigners looking to change behaviours and the next steps should be looking at the differences between parents who managed to change their Locus of Control compared to those who did not change,” Golding added. (IANS)

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