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Be Positive For Better Learning, Good Sleep

A range of employability skills such as teamwork, problem solving and planning were also associated with greater happiness in students, said the study

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Be Positive For Better Learning, Good Sleep
Online Learning is very helpful for everyone to acquire skills.

Young people with a positive outlook, self-belief and skills for the workplace are happier, sleep better and are better behaved, says a new study.

According to researchers from Britain-based Assessment and Development Consultants (A&DC) and ThinkForward, a non-profit organisation, positive attitudes such as self-belief, aspiration, flexibility and appetite for learning were associated with less hyperactivity, fewer emotional problems, fewer problems with fellow pupils and greater inclination to help others.

“Pupils with this positive mindset were also happier and slept better,” said Ali Shalfrooshan from A&DC.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

The research saw more than 270 students from 12 secondary schools completing questionnaires relating to their attitudes towards helping others, attitudes to school, behavioural problems and sleeping difficulties.

These questionnaires were used to inform targeted coaching to develop and enhance the employability skills of young people, said Louise Brown from ThinkForward in a study reported by the British Psychological Society.

Also Read: Smoking Affects Good Night’s Sleep Too

A range of employability skills such as teamwork, problem solving and planning were also associated with greater happiness in students, said the study.

Shalfrooshan and his team suggested that coaching young people would enable them to thrive during challenging economic times and be more capable of achieving their aspirations. (IANS)

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Good Sleep Helps in Reducing Desire for Sweet, Salty Foods

For the study, the researchers studied a data of 138 persons who were either healthy, healthy short-sleeping, overweight short-sleeping, or pre- or hypertensive short-sleeping individuals

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sleeping, impairment, inflammation, SLeep
Don't consume caffeinated drinks less than six hours before you go to sleep. Pixabay

A good night’s sleep helps in reducing the desire for sweet and salty foods, intake of sugar and caloric content, says a study.

It is known that sleeping less than seven hours is associated with an increased cardio-metabolic risk — heart disease risk and metabolic disorders — but increasing the sleep duration can help reduce it, said lead author Rob Henst, Associate Professor at the University of Cape Town in South Africa.

In the study, published in the Journal of Sleep Research, researchers found that sleep extension was associated with improved measures of insulin sensitivity and reductions in overall appetite, desire for sweet and salty foods, intake of daily free sugar, and percentage of daily caloric intake from protein.

FILE – A mixture of salty snacks and chips is shown on a table in Pittsburgh’s Market Square, Feb. 7, 2012. VOA

“It is now apparent that poor sleep quality may be an equally important risk factor for cardio-metabolic diseases,” said Dale Rae from the varsity.

Also Read- WhatsApp Troubling its Users in Several Countries

For the study, the researchers studied a data of 138 persons who were either healthy, healthy short-sleeping, overweight short-sleeping, or pre- or hypertensive short-sleeping individuals. (IANS)