Saturday March 23, 2019

Being A ‘Morning Person’ You Can Avoid Depression

Small differences may have potentially significant effects on the ability of our body clocks to keep time effectively, potentially altering risk of both disease and mental health disorders.

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morning person
Being A 'Morning Person' You Can Avoid Depression

Being a “morning person” can lead to greater well-being as well as lower the risk of developing schizophrenia and depression, finds a research.

However, for some it is hard to be a morning lark, and they would rather be a night owl. Various research have explained an idividual’s genetics as the reason behind this.

Now, a large-scale genomic analysis has identified 327 new genes, from earlier known 24, associated with a person’s sleep time, or chronotype.

The study, published in Nature Communications, revealed some of the inner workings of the body clock, shedding new light on how it links to mental health and disease.

It suggests that being genetically programmed to rise early is associated with better mental health, but does not affect body mass index (BMI) or risk of Type-2 diabetes.

depression
Being a “morning person” can lead to greater well-being as well as lower the risk of developing schizophrenia and depression, finds a research., Pixabay

“This study highlights a large number of genes which can be studied in more detail to work out how different people can have different body clocks,” said lead researcher Professor Mike Weedon, from the University of Exeter Medical School.

Importantly, the study also showed that the genetic variants the researchers identified could shift a person’s natural waking time by up to 25 mins – changing some people’s waking time from 8am to 8.25am, for example.

The researchers found that the genetic areas influence sleep timing, but not the quality or duration of sleep.

Depression
Depression is a common mental disorder. Flickr

“Our work indicates that part of the reason why some people are up with the lark while others are night owls is because of differences in both the way our brains react to external light signals and the normal functioning of our internal clocks,” Samuel E. Jones, of the University of Exeter Medical School explained.

“These small differences may have potentially significant effects on the ability of our body clocks to keep time effectively, potentially altering risk of both disease and mental health disorders.”

Also Read: Avoid Staring Screen Before Bedtime

The study was based on genome-wide data from 697,828 UK Biobank and 23andMe — a UK-based DNA testing website — participants.

The study further analysed 85,000 people through the use of wrist-worn activity monitors, confirming that the desire to either sleep in or get up in the morning is genetic. (IANS0

Next Story

Childhood Maltreatment Strongest Risk Factor for Depression in Adulthood: Lancet

The findings are to develop or improve risk-adapted interventions for people susceptible to a worse long-term clinical outcome

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depression
Fourteen had a remission period of less than two months and could therefore be regarded as having chronic depression. Pixabay

Facing trauma in childhood can significantly change the structure of the brain, which may result in severe depression which could even be recurrent in adulthood, say researchers.

The results from MRI scan images suggest that both childhood maltreatment and recurring depression are associated with similar reductions in the surface area of the insular cortex, part of the brain that regulates emotion and self-awareness.

This reduction in the brain could make a future relapse more likely, said the study, published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal, which found childhood maltreatment one of the strongest risk factors for major depression in adulthood.

depression
Depression is among the leading causes of disability in the U.S. and is being closely monitored by health authorities amid rising suicides nationwide. Pixabay

“Given the impact of the insular cortex on brain functions such as emotional awareness, it’s possible that the changes we saw make patients less responsive to conventional treatments,” said lead researcher Nils Opel from the University of Munster in Germany.

The study included 110 patients aged 18 to 60 years. Of the 75 patients who experienced a relapse, 48 had experienced one additional episode, seven reported two episodes, and six experienced three episodes.

Fourteen had a remission period of less than two months and could therefore be regarded as having chronic depression.

depression
This reduction in the brain could make a future relapse more likely, said the study, published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal. Pixabay

ALSO READ: 4 Indian-American Teenagers Awarded for Inventions in Environmental Issues

The findings are to develop or improve risk-adapted interventions for people susceptible to a worse long-term clinical outcome.

Future psychiatric research should therefore explore how the findings could be translated into special attention, care and treatment that could improve patient outcomes, the study noted. (IANS)