Saturday October 19, 2019

Being A ‘Morning Person’ You Can Avoid Depression

Small differences may have potentially significant effects on the ability of our body clocks to keep time effectively, potentially altering risk of both disease and mental health disorders.

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morning person
Being A 'Morning Person' You Can Avoid Depression

Being a “morning person” can lead to greater well-being as well as lower the risk of developing schizophrenia and depression, finds a research.

However, for some it is hard to be a morning lark, and they would rather be a night owl. Various research have explained an idividual’s genetics as the reason behind this.

Now, a large-scale genomic analysis has identified 327 new genes, from earlier known 24, associated with a person’s sleep time, or chronotype.

The study, published in Nature Communications, revealed some of the inner workings of the body clock, shedding new light on how it links to mental health and disease.

It suggests that being genetically programmed to rise early is associated with better mental health, but does not affect body mass index (BMI) or risk of Type-2 diabetes.

depression
Being a “morning person” can lead to greater well-being as well as lower the risk of developing schizophrenia and depression, finds a research., Pixabay

“This study highlights a large number of genes which can be studied in more detail to work out how different people can have different body clocks,” said lead researcher Professor Mike Weedon, from the University of Exeter Medical School.

Importantly, the study also showed that the genetic variants the researchers identified could shift a person’s natural waking time by up to 25 mins – changing some people’s waking time from 8am to 8.25am, for example.

The researchers found that the genetic areas influence sleep timing, but not the quality or duration of sleep.

Depression
Depression is a common mental disorder. Flickr

“Our work indicates that part of the reason why some people are up with the lark while others are night owls is because of differences in both the way our brains react to external light signals and the normal functioning of our internal clocks,” Samuel E. Jones, of the University of Exeter Medical School explained.

“These small differences may have potentially significant effects on the ability of our body clocks to keep time effectively, potentially altering risk of both disease and mental health disorders.”

Also Read: Avoid Staring Screen Before Bedtime

The study was based on genome-wide data from 697,828 UK Biobank and 23andMe — a UK-based DNA testing website — participants.

The study further analysed 85,000 people through the use of wrist-worn activity monitors, confirming that the desire to either sleep in or get up in the morning is genetic. (IANS0

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Consuming Potatoes are as Effective as Carbohydrate Gels: Study

Study's aim was to expand and diversify race-fuelling options for athletes and offset flavour fatigue

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Potatoes
Potatoes are a promising alternative for athletes because they represent a cost-effective, nutrient-dense and whole-food source of carbohydrates. Pixabay

Consuming potato puree during prolonged exercise works just as well as a commercial carbohydrate gel in sustaining blood glucose levels and boosting performance in trained athletes, a new study suggests.

“The research has shown that ingesting concentrated carbohydrate gels during prolonged exercise promotes carbohydrate availability during exercise and improves exercise performance,” said study’s lead author Nicholas Burd, Professor at the University of Illinois in the US.

“Our study aim was to expand and diversify race-fuelling options for athletes and offset flavour fatigue,” Burd said.

Potatoes are a promising alternative for athletes because they represent a cost-effective, nutrient-dense and whole-food source of carbohydrates, the researchers reported in the Journal of Applied Physiology.

Furthermore, they serve as a savoury race fuel option when compared with the high sweetness of carbohydrate gels.

Potatoes
Consuming Potatoes in form of puree during prolonged exercise works just as well as a commercial carbohydrate gel in sustaining blood glucose levels and boosting performance in trained athletes. Pixabay

The researchers recruited 12 participants who were healthy and devoted to their sport, averaging 165 miles per week on their bicycles.

To qualify for the trials, the cyclists had to reach a specific threshold for aerobic fitness and complete the 120-minute cycling challenge followed by a time trial.

Participants were randomly assigned to one of three conditions during the experiments: They would consume either water alone, a commercially available carbohydrate gel or an equivalent amount of carbohydrates obtained from potatoes.

The researchers standardised what the 12 cyclists ate for 24 hours before repeating the 120-minute cycling challenge and time trial, which was designed to mirror typical race conditions.

Throughout the exercise, the team measured participants’ blood glucose, core body temperature, exercise intensity, gastric emptying and gastrointestinal symptoms.

The researchers also measured concentrations of lactate, a metabolic marker of intense exercise, in participants’ blood.

Potatoes
The research on Potatoes has shown that ingesting concentrated carbohydrate gels during prolonged exercise promotes carbohydrate availability during exercise and improves exercise performance. Pixabay

“We found no differences between the performance of cyclists who got their carbohydrates by ingesting potatoes or gels at recommended amounts of about 60 grams per hour during the experiments.

“Both groups saw a significant boost in performance that those consuming only water did not achieve,” Burd added.

ALSO READ: One in Six Young People Use Snapchat While Driving

According to the study, plasma glucose concentrations went up by a similar amount in those consuming potatoes and gels. (IANS)