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Bizarre Things That Only Exist In North Korea

When South Korea stopped sending fertilizers to North Korea in 2008, the country faced a severe fertilizer shortage

BY- Jaya Choudhary

North Korea is a country well known for its secrecy, poverty, human rights violations, and its enigmatic leader Kim Jong Un. However, since it is such a private and unique nation, there are a few peculiarities that do not exist outside its borders. Here are several oddities that can only be found in Korea’s democratic people’s republic.

Korean cuts

Haircuts are a great way of expressing yourself but the number of potential style choices can sometimes be overwhelming. Luckily, the North Koreans do not have to go through vast choices because the government of North Korea issues a list of state-approved styles for their citizens. Women can choose from a list of about 18 styles, while men are limited to 10.

Korea
A necrocracy is a governmental system where the dead rule the living. Wikimediacommons

Traffic beauties

Pyongyang’s traffic police are directed by an entire workforce of traffic beauties. North Korean traffic conductors are rigorously trained with robotic precession and perform their role with utmost seriousness. The ladies are specifically chosen for their physical attractiveness and the job is among the highest respected roles for North Korean women.

Korea
Pyongyang’s traffic police are directed by an entire workforce of traffic beauties. Wikimediacommons

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Korean calendar

While most of the world is currently experiencing the year 2021, North Koreans are living in ‘Juche 110’.This is because the DPRK redefined its calendar around the birthday of the country’s founder Kim Il Sung who was born in the year 1912. Each year simply the number of years since April 15, 1912.

Necrocracy

A necrocracy is a governmental system where the dead rule the living. Kim Il Sung who has been dead for a quarter-century was declared eternal president of North Korea by his contemporaries giving him absolute power even after death.

Long-term punishment

It’s no revelation that North Korea takes political dissidence quite seriously, but the punishments can be even crazier than we could imagine. If someone is accused of disrespecting the Supreme leader, the offender along with his family and friends will be sent to a re-education camp. Moreover, if the crime is considered serious enough, the whole family will remain there for life with only the indoctrinated great-grandchildren being allowed back into society. This system originated in 1948 is called the ‘3 generations of punishment’ policy.

Korean Computing

While most people are familiar with Mac or Windows operating systems, these programs are a no-go in the Korean hermit kingdom. Instead, anyone lucky enough to own a computer uses a state-created operating system called ‘Red Star’.The program is essentially a Mac rip-off and uses a similar UI. Additionally, they have an own take on the internet too. There are about 5000 state-controlled websites that are only accessible in the DPRK. Also, the names of Kim Jong Un and Kim Il Sung must be coded to appear 20 percent larger than the surrounding text.

ALSO READ: North Korea funded Its Nuclear Program Via Cyber-crime

Statue laws

Some of the most iconic images of North Korea’s capital Pyongyang feature the colossal statues of its former leaders. Perhaps their great size is so memorable because it is illegal to capture parts of the statue. If you wish to take a photograph, you are legally required to capture the entire statue. It also illegal to chew gum or talk loudly nearby the statue.

Korea
It also illegal to chew gum or talk loudly nearby the statue. Wikimediacommons

Blue jeans ban

North Korea considers blue jeans to be a sign of US imperialism, so they are prohibited in the region.

Human fertilizer

When South Korea stopped sending fertilizers to North Korea in 2008, the country faced a severe fertilizer shortage. As a result, a new law was enacted, requiring residents to collect their poop and hand it over to authorities in order to aid the country’s agriculture.

So, if you are ever feeling down, just remember that you weren’t born in North Korea.

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