Tuesday August 20, 2019
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Brazil gives online racist comments bigger audience

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Racist comments: “If she bathed, she didn’t get grimy”

Rio de Janeiro: A new campaign is giving a hard time to racist trolls in Brazil by plastering billboards in their neighbourhoods with their racist Facebook comments — thanks to a civil rights group run by Afro-Brazilian women.

The group has come up with this novel idea “to educate people that their words have a real impact”.

The campaign — ‘Virtual racism, real consequences’ — is run by Criola, an organisation founded in 1992 and led by black women.

It uses the location tag from Facebook posts to find where the offenders live. The group then buys billboard space in their neighbourhoods and puts the offenders’ comments on it, but blurring out their names and photos.

The project republishes the online comments as a reminder that virtual bullying can have an impact in the real world.

racist comment: “A black girl called Maju. You can’t complain about prejudice”
racist comment: “A black girl called Maju. You can’t complain about prejudice”

The campaign was launched in Rio de Janeiro after several racist comments were posted on social networking sites against Maria Julia Coutinho, the weather presenter of the most important news show in Brazil on July 3 — the country’s National Day to Combat Racial Discrimination.

Coutinho, the first black weather forecaster on Brazilian prime time television, corrected another anchor on air.

When another news site praised her for getting the terminology correct, many Facebook users responded with a torrent of comments against everything from her hair to her race.

racist comments: “GFY dirty nigga, I dunno u but I wash myself”
racist comments: “GFY dirty nigga, I dunno u but I wash myself”

“We wanted to provoke reflection. Does a comment on the internet causes less damage than a direct offence? For those who comment, may be. But for those who suffer it, the prejudice is the same,” says Criola on its official website.

In partnership with billboard media companies, the non-profit group put on the streets real comments posted on Facebook against the journalist.

“I got home stinking of black people,” reads one comment, while another says: “GFY dirty nigga, I dunno u but I wash myself.”

racist comments: “I arrived home smelling black people”
racist comments: “I arrived home smelling black people”

“We omitted names and faces of the authors — we had no intention of exposing the aggressors. We just wanted to raise awareness. This way people can think about the consequences before posting this kind of comment on the internet,” Coutinho says.

(IANS)

(Photos from IndianExpress.com)

Next Story

Email Attacks: IT Professionals Struggle in Spotting Suspicious Emails

Spear phishing is widespread with 43 per cent of organizations being the victim of a spear-phishing attack in the past 12 months

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Cyber crime, U.S. programming
A man types on a computer keyboard in front of displayed cyber code in this illustration picture. VOA

Email attacks like phishing and ransomware are having a major impact on businesses globally, with over three-quarters of organizations saying their employees aren’t good at spotting suspicious emails, a new report has stressed.

Nearly 74 per cent of respondents say email attacks are having a major impact on their businesses while 78 per cent of organizations said the cost of email breaches is increasing, according to the report titled “2019 Email Security Trends” by the US-based cyber security firm Barracuda Networks. Spear phishing is widespread with 43 per cent of organizations being the victim of a spear-phishing attack in the past 12 months.

“While most IT professionals are more confident about their email security systems than they were a year ago, email attacks continue to have a significant impact on businesses,” said the report. The most common effects cited were loss of employee productivity, downtime and business disruption, and damage to the reputation of the IT team.

email attacks
Nearly 74 per cent of respondents say email attacks are having a major impact on their businesses. Pixabay

“Nearly three-quarters of respondents reported experiencing higher stress levels, worrying about potential email security even when they’re not at work, and being forced to work nights and weekends to address email security issues,” the findings showed.

ALSO READ: Instead of Sharing Personal Number, Use Temporary Virtual Number to Increase Safety

“Nearly a quarter of respondents advised that attacks have cost their organization $100,000 or more. Ninety-two per cent of Office 365 users have security concerns,” said the report. The report included responses from 660 executives, individual contributors and team managers serving in IT-security roles.

Companies surveyed include small, mid-sized, and enterprise businesses in technology, financial services, education, healthcare, manufacturing, government, telecommunication, retail and other industries. (IANS)