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BRICS mission to strengthen ties, accept diversity and work towards world development

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Beijing, July 11 (IANS) The rise of BRICS nations is inevitable, said a Chinese daily that expects “its bigger role in world peace and security”.

An editorial in People’s Daily said that the mission of BRICS nations is to safeguard world peace and security, to promote common development, to accept diversified culture and to strengthen global economic restructuring concerns not only for its own member countries, but also the future of the whole world.

The meeting of the five leaders of the BRICS countries — Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa — in Ufa, Russia, is “seen as vitally important to strengthen relations among the nations”.

bricsThe daily said that the summit agenda included ways to “promote partnership among its five nations, represent the real efforts they’ve made, and give clear guidance for future development”.

It said that the five countries have witnessed great progress in its cooperation, especially the setting up of the BRICS Bank, known as New Development Bank (NDB). “It has proved the feasibility and efficiency of its cooperation.”

The daily went on to say that with a total population of 3 billion, BRICS nations’ development and economic growth will surely affect the whole world in a positive way.

“We strongly believe and expect its bigger role in world peace and security if it continues to practice multilateralism and to give up a cold-war attitude,” it said, adding: “The rise of BRICS nations is inevitable and their future should be brighter if they continue to strengthen.”

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Report Claims, As Many As 1 Billion Indians Live in Areas of Water Scarcity

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater -- 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater -- 12 per cent of the global total.

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Global groundwater depletion - where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally - increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India's rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period. Pixabay

As many as one billion people in India live in areas of physical water scarcity, of which 600 million are in areas of high to extreme water stress, according to a new report.

Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid.

This number is expected to go up to five billion by 2050, said the report titled “Beneath the Surface: The State of the World’s Water 2019”, released to mark World Water Day on March 22.

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Pure water droplet. Pixabay

Physical water scarcity is getting worse, exacerbated by growing demand on water resources and and by climate and population changes.

By 2040 it is predicted that 33 countries are likely to face extremely high water stress – including 15 in the Middle East, most of Northern Africa, Pakistan, Turkey, Afghanistan and Spain. Many – including India, China, Southern Africa, USA and Australia – will face high water stress.

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Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid. Pixabay

Global groundwater depletion – where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally – increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India’s rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period.

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The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater — 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater — 12 per cent of the global total.

The WaterAid report warned that food and clothing imported by wealthy Western countries are making it harder for many poor and marginalised communities to get a daily clean water supply as high-income countries buy products with considerable “water footprints” – the amount of water used in production — from water-scarce countries. (IANS)