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British Campaigner Sues Facebook Over Fake Ads

British campaigner to sue Facebook over fake ads

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Facebook Confirms Data-sharing Agreements with Chinese Firms
Facebook Confirms Data-sharing Agreements with Chinese Firms. Pixabay
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British consumer campaigner Martin Lewis is suing Facebook for defamation after dozens of fake advertisements bearing his name were published on the social media platform.

The founder of MoneySavingExpert.com — a British consumer finance information website — said that at least 50 fake ads bearing his name appeared on the social media platform, causing reputational damage to him, BBC reported late on Sunday.

Lewis is due to lodge court papers at the High Court for a defamation case against Facebook on Monday. He is seeking damages but pledged that the money would go to anti-scam charities, the report noted.

Several advertisements allegedly show his face alongside endorsements that he has not made.

Representational image for Facebook.
Representational image. Pixabay

“These adverts tout schemes with titles such as Bitcoin code and Cloud Trader which, according to Lewis, are fronts for binary trading firms outside the European Union (EU),” BBC said.

Binary trading is a form of financial transaction which British financial regulatory body Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) has warned consumers against.

According to Lewis, a woman had spent 100,000 pounds ($140,000) in “a binary trading nightmare” that had attached his name to its advertising.

“I get about five messages a day from people saying, ‘I’ve just seen your Bitcoin ad and wanted to check it.’ If that is the number who get through to me, how many more must be just taken in?” Lewis was quoted as saying.

Also Read: Facebook introduces new privacy updates for EU users

He said Facebook had failed to stop the adverts despite his complaints and action.

“It is consistent, it is repeated. Other companies who have run these adverts have taken them down. What is particularly pernicious about Facebook is that it says the onus is on me, so I have spent time and effort and stress repeatedly to have them taken down,” he said.

Meanwhile, Facebook said the misleading ads are not allowed and any reported are removed.  IANS

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Facebook Fails to Stop Users from Sharing Pirated Movies

According to the recent Facebook transparency report, it took down 2.8 million pieces of content based on approximately 370,000 user copyright reports in the second half of 2017

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In its battle against pirated content, Facebook last year acquired a US-based startup Source3 to help it weed out pirated videos and other content that users share without permission. Pixabay

Several Facebook groups are sharing pirated Hollywood movies to hundred of thousands of users and the social media giant’s automated software are unable to stop copyright infringements, the media reported.

According to the Business Insider, these Facebook groups make no attempt to conceal catalogs brimming with the latest blockbusters like “Ant Man and the Wasp” and “A Quiet Place.”

“These groups, some of which are years old, exist despite Facebook’s army of human content moderators and automated software meant to detect copyright-infringing content, raising questions about the effectiveness of Facebook’s content-policing systems,” the report said on Sunday.

Some of the group’s titles are “Full HD English Movie” which has more than 134,000 members and “Free full movies 2018” that has 171,000 members.

A Facebook spokesperson was quoted as saying that “it wasn’t the company’s responsibility to take down such content unless asked to by the content’s rights holders”.

Facebook mobile app
Facebook mobile app. Pixabay

In its battle against pirated content, Facebook last year acquired a US-based startup Source3 to help it weed out pirated videos and other content that users share without permission.

“We’re excited to work with the Source3 team and learn from the expertise they’ve built in intellectual property, trademarks and copyright. As always, we are focused on ensuring we serve our partners well,” a Facebook spokesperson said at the time of the acquisition.

Facebook has been struggling to crack down on pirated content for a long time.

Also Read: Facebook will not Remove Fake News – but will ‘Demote’ it

The company had in past announced “Rights Manager” technology to detect and remove video clips shared by people who do not have rights to the video.

According to the recent Facebook transparency report, it took down 2.8 million pieces of content based on approximately 370,000 user copyright reports in the second half of 2017. (IANS)

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