Thursday November 21, 2019
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British Scientists Use Sunlight And Converted It To Fuel

Hydrogenase is an enzyme present in algae that is capable of reducing protons into hydrogen.

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Hydrogen, Fuel
Scientists pioneer novel model to turn sunlight into fuel.Flickr

In a breakthrough move, British scientists have used natural sunlight to convert water into hydrogen and oxygen by mixing biological components and man-made technologies.

The team led by academics at the University of Cambridge, used semi-artificial photosynthesis to explore new ways to produce and store solar energy, a finding that could now be used to revolutionise the systems used for renewable energy production.

Their method also managed to absorb more solar light than natural photosynthesis.

Hydrogen Fuel
Representational Image Of Fossil Fuel plant.
Wikimedia Commons.

“Natural photosynthesis is not efficient because it has evolved merely to survive so it makes the bare minimum amount of energy needed — around 1-2 per cent of what it could potentially convert and store,” said lead author Katarzyna Soko, doctoral student at the University’s St. John’s College.

Artificial photosynthesis has been around for decades but it has not yet been successfully used to create renewable energy because it relies on the use of catalysts, which are often expensive and toxic. This means it cannot yet be used to scale up findings to an industrial level.

The new model, detailed in the journal Nature Energy, is the first to successfully use hydrogenase and photosystem II to create semi-artificial photosynthesis driven purely by solar power.

Hydrogen, Fuel
Hydrogen. Flickr

The team not only improved on the amount of energy produced and stored, they managed to reactivate a process in the algae that has been dormant for millennia.

Also Read: SpiceJet To Test A Flight Powered By BioFuel

“Hydrogenase is an enzyme present in algae that is capable of reducing protons into hydrogen. During evolution this process has been deactivated because it wasn’t necessary for survival but we successfully managed to bypass the inactivity to achieve the reaction we wanted — splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen,” Soko explained.

Soko hopes the findings will enable new innovative model systems for solar energy conversion to be developed. (IANS)

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66% Indian Business Decision Makers Concerned About Cyber Threats

In line with this approach, 79 per cent of Indian business decision makers would want to adopt deeply-integrated or synchronised security solutions that could detect, investigate and respond to cyber threats

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Cyber Threats
Cyber security is a shared responsibility. While IT teams must be proactive in their response to Cyber Threats, knowledgeable employees and leadership teams pave the way for organisations to better detect, protect and respond. Pixabay

Sixty-six per cent of business decision makers in India believe lack of security expertise is a challenge for their organisations, while 63 per cent of Indian businesses are concerned about being exposed to Cyber Threats due to employee errors, according to a new report.

“As the threat landscape evolves, businesses too need to advance their defence mechanisms with synchronised security solutions that are designed to strengthen their cyber security posture,” Sunil Sharma, Managing Director, Sales, Sophos India and SAARC, said in a statement.

The success of an organisation’s cyber security investment lies not just in buying technology, but corporate culture, employee education and path-to-purchase also play critical roles, according to the Future of Cybersecurity in Asia Pacific and Japan-Culture, Efficiency, Awareness report.

“Cyber security is a shared responsibility. While IT teams must be proactive in their response to Cyber Threats, knowledgeable employees and leadership teams pave the way for organisations to better detect, protect and respond,” Sharma said.

Cyber Threats
Sixty-six per cent of business decision makers in India believe lack of security expertise is a challenge for their organisations, while 63 per cent of Indian businesses are concerned about being exposed to Cyber Threats due to employee errors. Pixabay

Only 19 per cent of Indian organisations regularly make significant changes to their cyber security approach, and 38 per cent intend to make changes to security approach in the next 6-24 months.

In line with this approach, 79 per cent of Indian business decision makers would want to adopt deeply-integrated or synchronised security solutions that could detect, investigate and respond to cyber threats, it added.

ALSO READ: Innovation and Startup Culture Thriving in Ghana

According to global cyber security major Sophos, main triggers for security updates — beyond changes to overall security posture — are technology and product developments, compliance and regulation requirements, and growing awareness of new attacks. (IANS)