Thursday March 21, 2019
Home Indian Diaspora British Sikhs...

British Sikhs to build houses for Nepal earthquake victims

0
//

Nepal_1505

By NewsGram Staff Writer

After helping the flood victims in Bosnia, a team of British Sikhs is in Nepal to help the bereft people in building their homes and providing them with food and medicine.

The members are from the Punjab-based voluntary organization Khalsa Aid.

“We have raised 250 shelters till date and the target is to raise an equal number of structures,” said Kanwar Singh of Khalsa Aid.

The team of Khalsa Aid reached Nepal within 12 hours of the first quake in the country on April 25.

“In the next 48 hours we all arrived here from Britain,” Kanwar Singh added.

A builder by profession and volunteer of the charity, Jim Winkworth is in charge of the reconstruction work in Nepal.

“We are raising structures with new material or stuff retrieved from the debris,” Winkworth told IANS.

“The charity daily holds community kitchens in and around Kathmandu, providing food to over 8,000 people,” said Amanpreet Singh, project co-ordinator.

Singh recently came in Nepal from Bosnia, and he said that if needed they might extend the project in this land-locked country.

Khalsa Aid is an international non-profit aid and relief organization founded on the Sikh principles of selfless service and universal love. It was established in the year 1999 and helped in providing relief assistance to the victims of disasters, wars and other tragic events around the world.

The organization has provided 10 tonnes of relief material, comprising food, water purification tablets, medicines and tents for the quake victims.

Next Story

Fear of Leprosy Resurgence in Nepal

There are only three staff working in the leprosy section and the same team looks after the disability programme, as well, he told the newspaper

0
Leprosy, Wikimedia

Health officials in Nepal fear leprosy resurgence in the country with prevalence rate reaching 0.94 per cent in 2018.

Leprosy-free status was given to the Himalayan nation after it declared elimination of the disease in 2009. However, that status could be lost if prevalence rate reaches one per cent of total population, Kathmandu Post reported on Thursday.

Experts already fear that this marks the resurgence of the disease in Nepal. The percentage could be more, an official said, as the current given figures have been derived just from preliminary data.

The Leprosy Control and Disability (LCD) section of Epidemiology and Disease Control Division (EDCD) of Department of Health Services said that the prevalence rate was 0.92 and 0.89 in 2017 and 2016, respectively, the news report said.

“It will be a great setback for the country if it loses the status,” said Rabindra Baskota, a doctor and chief of the LCD section.

Incubation period of leprosy varies from one to 20 years and diagnosis of more patients could help stop the further spread of the disease, according to him.

An amputated leg, claw toes and claw hands of leprosy patient Gopal Bag are seen at the Leprosy Mission Trust India hospital. Kolkata. VOA

“It will take only a couple of years to reach one percent if this upward trend continues,” he added.

The prevalence rate is over one per cent in various districts of the Tarai region, Baskota said, adding that the country had received the leprosy eliminated status, after reducing its prevalence rate by 0.77 per cent, in 2009.

Sishir Silwal, a focal person for the leprosy control programme in Gulmi district, said regular review meetings for leprosy, which should be held every four months, has not been held for the last eight months.

Also Read- Poor Cognitive Function Raises Bad Oral Health in Elderly

Kathmandu Post quoted Bibek Kumar Lal, Director at EDCD, as saying that there is a severe crunch in manpower that hinders proper functioning.

There are only three staff working in the leprosy section and the same team looks after the disability programme, as well, he told the newspaper.

Leprosy, a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, is transmitted through nasal secretion or from droplets from the mouth. It affects the skin, peripheral nerves and eyes, leading to disfigurement and nerve damage. The disease is curable with a multi-drug therapy. (IANS)