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Bullying Bosses Bad for Workplace Safety, Reveals Study

"Bosses' behaviour can strengthen or weaken employees' sense of belonging to the work group by supporting

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Bullying, Bosses, Workplace
According to the study published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, the researchers surveyed 589 airline pilots and 468 manufacturing technicians and found that employees' safety behaviour can get worse when they are treated in ways that detract from their bonds. Pixabay

Bullying bosses are not just bad for the morale and well-being of employees — they can also be bad for workplace safety, reveals a study.

According to the study published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, the researchers surveyed 589 airline pilots and 468 manufacturing technicians and found that employees’ safety behaviour can get worse when they are treated in ways that detract from their bonds to a work group.

“Bosses’ behaviour can strengthen or weaken employees’ sense of belonging to the work group by supporting or undermining their status within the group. Poor treatment from a boss can make employees feel that they are not valued by the group,” said Liu-Qin Yang, Associate Professor at Portland State University.

This makes them more self-centered, leading them to occasionally forget to comply with safety rules or overlook opportunities to promote a safer work environment.

Bullying, Bosses, Workplace
Bullying bosses are not just bad for the morale and well-being of employees — they can also be bad for workplace safety, reveals a study. Pixabay

According to the researchers, this was especially true among employees who were more uncertain about their social standing within the group.

“When people are less sure about their strengths, weaknesses and their status within the group, they become more sensitive. They are more likely to respond negatively to their boss’ bullying behaviours,” she said.

Workplace safety is a critical issue — and more so in an environment where one employee’s failure to behave safely can create circumstances where other people are likely to be injured, said the researchers.

The study recommends implementing training programmes that can improve leadership skills while interacting with their employees so as to provide feedback in a way that are neither offensive nor threatening.

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The study also suggested promoting a more civil and engaged work environment that strengthens social bonds between employees and creates a buffer against the negative consequences of their boss’ bad behaviours.

According to researchers, implementing transparent performance evaluation processes are required so that employees have less uncertainty about their social status in the workplace. (IANS)

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Once a Cheater, Always a Cheater

Cheater at school means cheater at workplace

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Cheater
If you were a cheater at school then you are likely to be on at your workplace. Wikimedia Commons

Once a cheater, always a cheater may be a true saying as researchers now discover that students’ tolerance for cheating may spill over into their careers.

The study by professors at two California State University campuses, including San Francisco State University, tackled two questions: If students tolerate cheating in the classroom, will they also tolerate unethical behavior in their careers? And what’s shaping these attitudes?

“If [students] have this attitude while they’re in school — that it’s OK to cheat in school — that attitude unfortunately will carry over to the corporate boardroom,” said San Francisco State Professor and Chair of Marketing Foo Nin Ho.

The fear is that these lax attitudes, if left unchecked, could manifest later as turning a blind eye to unethical business behaviour or participating in a cover-up, added the study’s lead author Glen Brodowsky from California State University San Marcos.

To conduct the study, the authors surveyed nearly 250 undergraduate marketing students.

cheater at school
If a student can tolerate cheating in school then he/she is most likely to be a cheater at workplace. Wikimedia Commons

They were asked to respond to statements about cheating and ethics such as “It’s cheating to ask another student what was on the test” and “Within a business firm, the ends justify the means.”

The survey found that students who were more tolerant of cheating in a classroom also demonstrated an openness to unethical behaviour on the job.

Some students face enormous pressure from their families to succeed in college, so those students may engage in cheating to avoid the shame of flunking out, the findings showed.

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Understanding the cultural forces at work could help professors develop culturally sensitive ways to minimize these unethical behaviours in their classrooms.

“As professors, we need to set the tone and say, ‘This is what’s not rewarded in the classroom’ and train students that following ethical behaviour leads to better outcomes,” Brodowsky said. “So when they graduate and work for companies they will better equipped to evaluate that situation.” (IANS)