Tuesday February 19, 2019
Home Opinion Capturing the...

Capturing the moment or trapping the victim?

0
//

Daily, your Facebook wall gets at least one video which shows how a person is abused in one way or the other. The world should know the evil which we need to eradicate, and so the video is viral. But does it help?

By Kanika Rangray

New Delhi: There is a video going viral on Facebook which shows a mall toy car operator forcibly kissing a child. In this heart-wrenching video you see the innocent little boy trying with his meagre strength to push away the man as he is crying for help.

What was happening?

Instead of helping the innocent little kid, instead of pulling off the toy car operator from the boy, the person assumed it would be better to make a video of the entire incident and put it on social media. May be it was thought to be the ‘right content’ to make the video viral.

A simple question, please answer— how did making the video help out the little kid? Will it be able to erase the trauma which might have embedded itself in the innocent’s mind? Wouldn’t the better option be to go ahead and stop the trauma than to film it?

Photo credit: brafton.com This picture is for representational purpose only
Photo credit: brafton.com
This picture is for representational purpose only

This is not the first time that such incident has occurred. People prefer to watch from the sidelines, filming the troubles faced by a person, and then brandishing the video around to their friends or on social media, instead of lending a helping hand. All this is done, supposedly, for ‘creating awareness’ about the issue.

Such an example can be seen almost daily in the Delhi metro. A mother holding her son in her arms tries to de-board the train. But the crowd is least interested in letting her deboard and more interested in getting on to the train. Hence follows a tussle, in which the little kiddo—hardly three or four years of age—gets hurt and starts crying. What happens next? NOTHING! The onlookers take out their mobiles and start filming the incident rather than helping the woman. Isn’t it cute to see a kid cry? May be it is!

Again, another example from the Metro—general compartment, man misbehaving with a girl, the other passengers ‘ladies included’ standby and watch, some make videos, nobody helps.

Whenever such examples of social evils or people’s lack of etiquette comes to the front, heaps of comments, ideas, suggestions start pouring in—advising that these social evils can only be stopped when the society changes its mentality.

Well aren’t you a part of that society whose mentality—so gallantly said—needs to be changed? Whether you lend a helping hand or take up videography depends on your ‘mentality’.  As Mahatma Gandhi had once said, “be the change you wish to see in the world.”

Think about it. You could save yourself a large amount of candles and numerous candle marches, by acting at the moment rather than protesting later.

At every such incident smartphones come out of your pocket and start filming—your phones are getting smarter, when will you?

Next Story

UK Parliamentary Report Highlights Facebook Acting as ‘Digital Gangsters’

The report highlights Facebook documents obtained by the committee relating to a Californian court case brought by US-based app developer Six4Three.

0
Facebook
Facebook App on a smartphone device. (VOA)

Lashing out at Facebook for behaving like “digital gangsters” in the online world, a UK parliamentary committee concluded that the social networking giant intentionally and knowingly violated both data privacy and anti-competition laws.

In its final report on Monday after an 18-month investigation into disinformation and “fake news”, the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) select committee of the UK Parliament called for stricter regulation to make Facebook end spread of disinformation on its platform.

“Democracy is at risk from the malicious and relentless targeting of citizens with disinformation and personalised ‘dark adverts’ from unidentifiable sources, delivered through the major social media platforms we use everyday,” Damian Collins, Chair of the DCMS Committee, said in a statement.

The report highlights Facebook documents obtained by the committee relating to a Californian court case brought by US-based app developer Six4Three.

Facebook
The now-defunct start-up Six4Three alleged that Facebook collected information on users and their friends through its apps. Pixabay

Through scrutiny of internal Facebook emails between 2011 and 2015, the report found evidence to indicate that the company was willing to override its users’ privacy settings in order to transfer data to some app developers.

The investigation found that Facebook was willing to charge high prices in advertising to some developers, for the exchange of data, and starve some developers – such as Six4Three – of that data, contributing to them losing their business.

The now-defunct start-up Six4Three alleged that Facebook collected information on users and their friends through its apps.

The report also named Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg who refused summons to appear before the committee three times.

“By choosing not to appear before the Committee and by choosing not to respond personally to any of our invitations, Mark Zuckerberg has shown contempt towards both the UK Parliament and the ‘International Grand Committee’, involving members from nine legislatures from around the world,” the report said.

 

facebook
The report also named Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg who refused summons to appear before the committee three times. Pixabay

“Mark Zuckerberg continually fails to show the levels of leadership and personal responsibility that should be expected from someone who sits at the top of one of the world’s biggest companies,” Collins said.

Launched in 2017, the inquiry intensified after the Cambridge Analytica data-harvesting scandal became public.

 

ALSO READ: Just Like Twitter, LinkedIn Starts Showing Trending Professional Stories

In the 108-page report, the UK lawmakers accused Facebook of continuing to prioritise shareholders’ profits over users’ privacy rights.

“We are open to meaningful regulation and support the committee’s recommendation for electoral law reform,” Karim Palant, Facebook’s UK public policy manager, was quoted as saying by The Guardian. (IANS)