Monday December 16, 2019

Child’s Health Also Impacted By The Father’s Exercise Routine

The researchers also found that exercise helped even with a poor diet.

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Infants, baby, WOmb
Winter care for your little ones. Pixabay

Many people know that a woman’s health, including her diet and exercise habits, can impact the health of her baby even before she gets pregnant. But, until recently, little was known about a father’s diet and exercise choices.

Matthew Hurt is teaching his young sons how to hit a baseball. He wants them to enjoy sports and exercising.

“I want it to be just natural for them. I don’t want it to be a chore. I want them to just want to go outside, want to be active and enjoy life to its fullest.”

Impact of exercise

A study at Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center looked at the impact of fathers’ exercise habits on their offspring.

Kristin Stanford is a member of Ohio State’s Diabetes and Metabolism Research Center. She co-led the study. The results showed that even moderate exercise before a baby was conceived “resulted in an improved metabolic health in their adult offspring. Essentially, it improved their glucose metabolism, decreased body weight and increased their insulin sensitivity.”

The World Health Organization says 1 in 4 adults worldwide are dangerously inactive. That increases the risk of obesity, high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, cancer and diabetes.

Child, baby, father
A man twirls a young baby on a waterfront park as downtown Seattle disappears in a smoky haze behind, Aug. 19, 2018. VOA

Inactivity also has social and economic consequences.

The research at Ohio State was done in mice. More work needs to be done to see if it applies to people as well.

“The idea would be that if you have a dad who wants to have a baby, if they would exercise maybe just a month prior to conception, that would have a really dramatic effect on their child’s life.”

Child, baby, father
Exposure to smoking in childhood thickens arteries’ walls which, in turn, ups the risks of heart attack and stroke. Pixabay

Poor diet? Just exercise

The researchers also found that exercise helped even with a poor diet. Sedentary mice fed a high fat diet passed along negative health issues like obesity and insulin resistance, but those effects were completely reversed by exercise.

Also Read: Top Health Habits Which Parents Can Teach Their Children

“A high-fat diet, even mild high-fat diet, in this case it was only three weeks, changes the profile, but exercise kind of restored it back to normal.”

More work needs to be done to see if the same applies to humans. But in the animal studies, exercise for the male mouse was key to the health of his offspring.

Next Story

Exercise may Trigger Migraine Attacks in Women: Study

Here's why exercise won't help most women suffering from migraine

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Migraine in women
Although regular aerobic exercise has been strongly recommended, it may trigger migraine attacks in women. Lifetime Stock

Despite doctors recommending regular aerobic exercise to prevent migraine, physical exercise can actually be a trigger of migraine attacks for most women because of “anxiety sensitivity” in them, find researchers.

“Anxiety sensitivity” refers to one’s fear of experiencing anxiety arousal due to harmful physical, cognitive and socially-observable consequences, may be related to physical activity (PA) avoidance in migraine patients.

Migraine affects around 10-15 per cent of the population around the globe, and among its most common diagnosis criteria include a throbbing, unilateral head pain, hypersensitivity to lights, sounds, odour, and aggravation by activity.

Although regular aerobic exercise has been strongly recommended by clinicians as an adjuvant option for migraine prevention, for up to one-third of patients, physical exercise can be a trigger of migraine attacks, thus, it can instead be avoided as a strategy to manage migraine, said researchers.

Migraine women
Women who suffer from migraine should avoid physical activity. Lifetime Stock

The study, published in the journal Cephalalgia and highlighted an overlooked relationship between migraine and exercise, was led by Samantha G Farris from Rutgers, Department of Psychology, the State University of New Jersey.

The researchers assessed 100 women with probable migraine, who filled an online survey covering anxiety sensitivity scores, intentional avoidance of moderate and vigorous physical activity (PA) in the past month, as well as the self-rated perception that exercise would trigger a migraine attack and worse migraine symptoms.

The results showed that increased anxiety sensitivity scores associated with PA avoidance of both moderate and vigorous intensities.

One-point increase in the anxiety sensitivity scale resulted in up to 5 per cent increase in the odds for avoiding PA.

Also Read- Saliva Test can Detect Oropharyngeal Cancer

Migraine is a highly prevalent and disabling neurological disorder, in which regular PA is part of current non-pharmacological treatment recommendations.

The authors wrote that “patients with migraine and elevated anxiety sensitivity could benefit from tailored, multi-component intervention”. (IANS)