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China Traces 260 missing Children with the Help of a Mobile App

The mobile app "Tuanyuan" or reunion was launched by Ministry of Public Security (MPS) in May 2015, where the police release information on missing children

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November 16, 2016: China traced over 250 missing children during the last six months with the help of a mobile app.

The mobile app “Tuanyuan” or reunion was launched by Ministry of Public Security (MPS) in May 2015, where the police release information on missing children.

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Over the past six months, over 280 updates on missing children have been posted on the mobile app and 260 children have been found, including 152 children who ran away from their houses, 18 children who had been trafficked, 27 who were reportedly lost, and 52 who had died from drowning or other reasons, MPS said.

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The app also helps to ensure that efficient information sharing as well as collaboration between police in different regions. It encourages witnesses to report the whereabouts of the missing or trafficked children.

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A new version of the app was launched on Wednesday, which will expand its reach by cooperating with other popular apps, state-run Xinhua news agency reported.

Missing children is one of a major problems in China as the children are stolen by traffickers to sell them for adoption to childless couples are use them for begging and other crimes.

by NewsGram team with PTI inputs

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Google’s Censored Search Engine For China A ‘Stupid Move’ Says Ex-Employee

The tech giant had launched a search engine in China in 2006, but pulled the service out of the country in 2010, citing Chinese government efforts to limit free speech and block websites

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Google’s reported plan to launch a censored version of its search engine in China has come under heavy criticism from a former Asia-Pacific head of the company’s free expression issues who called it a “stupid move”.

“This is just a really bad idea, a stupid, stupid move. I feel compelled to speak out and say that this is not right,” The Intercept quoted Lokman Tsui as saying on Friday.

Tsui was Google’s head of free expression for Asia and the Pacific between 2011 and 2014.

The news about Google’s plan to build a censored search engine broke last week.

Codenamed “Dragonfly”, the search platform would blacklist “sensitive queries” about topics including politics, free speech, democracy, human rights and peaceful protest, according to a previous report by The Intercept.

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“I can’t see a way to operate Google search in China without violating widely held international human rights standards,” the report quoted Tsui as saying.

Google is yet to officially confirm or deny the search engine project.

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Tsui said that if Google goes ahead with the censored search engine project, it would go against its publicly stated ethos.

The tech giant had launched a search engine in China in 2006, but pulled the service out of the country in 2010, citing Chinese government efforts to limit free speech and block websites. (IANS)