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Comic-strip Hero Tintin’s “Destination Moon” to be real? Interfederal Space Agency of Belgium (ISAB) to be set up in 2017

About 60 firms in the local sector include the 96-year-old SABCA, which has worked on Europe's Ariane rocket program

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Visitors pass by drawings by Belgium illustrator Herge during a Tintin exhibition in Paris, Dec.19, 2006. The country enters the space race, as illustrated in the comic strip in the 1950s, with plans to form a space agency next year. VOA

Belgian comic-strip hero Tintin helped popularize the 1950s Space Race with his iconic cartoon rocket; seven decades on from the boy reporter’s “Destination Moon,” his country is finally getting its own version of NASA.

The Interfederal Space Agency of Belgium (ISAB) will be set up next year, science minister Elke Sleurs said, arguing that it would help a local industry hang on to what is now a 5-percent share of the EU’s 7 billion-euro a year space industry.

Challenges from the likes of rising powers India and China and changing rules for EU-wide tenders meant Belgium should pool resources to help its companies compete, she said: “If we just keep the status quo, we risk losing out on space contracts.”

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About 60 firms in the local sector include the 96-year-old SABCA, which has worked on Europe’s Ariane rocket program.

Images from Tintin space stories, starting with “Destination Moon” in 1950, have become Belgian national treasures and fed popular fascination worldwide with cosmic adventure.

A single original drawing by his creator Herge from 1954’s “Explorers on the Moon” sold last week in Paris for 1.55 million euros (1.64 million U.S. dollars). (VOA)

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European Space Agency Risking a Potentially Catastrophic Collision

ESA said Tuesday that it reached out early to SpaceX and was informed that no maneuver was planned for the Starlink satellite

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European, Space Agency, Collision
FILE - A digital representation of the Aeolus wind satellite is seen in this handout image from the European Space Agency, Aug. 21, 2018. VOA

The European Space Agency says it has performed an evasive maneuver with one of its satellites after rival SpaceX said it wouldn’t move its own spacecraft out of the way, risking a potentially catastrophic collision.

ESA said Tuesday that it “reached out early to SpaceX and was informed that no maneuver was planned for the Starlink satellite before the close approach.”

The agency said the manual maneuver Monday didn’t affect operations of the Aeolus satellite, which was launched in August 2018 to measure global wind speeds and directions, thereby improving weather forecasts.

European, Space Agency, Collision
The European Space Agency says it has performed an evasive maneuver with one of its satellites after rival SpaceX said it wouldn’t move its own spacecraft out of the way. Pixabay

ESA says the advent of so-called mega constellations like Starlink, consisting of hundreds or thousands of satellites, means collision avoidance maneuvers will need to be automated in future.

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SpaceX didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. (VOA)