Thursday August 22, 2019

CSE Study to Identify Sources of Pollution in Real-Time

Delhi-NCR pollution: CSE study to identify sources of pollution in real-time

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Delhi, air pollution, cold, smog
People take early morning walk amid smog in New Delhi, Dec. 26, 2018. In the Indian capital, the air quality hovered between severe and very poor this week posing a serious health hazard for millions of people. VOA

The Centre for Science and Environment (CSE), in association with the Delhi Pollution Control Committee (DPCC) and leading instrumentation company Horiba, Japan launched a pilot study on Wednesday on real-time source apportionment of PM2.5 in Delhi and adjoining areas.

The objective of the study is to identify the signature of various sources of pollution and carry out source speciation in select hotspots in Delhi and the National Capital Region.

The study was launched by the CSE in a round-table meeting here.

The monitoring for the study will begin from January 28 and continue till April 28. In these three months, the study will monitor around a dozen locations in Delhi-NCR.

Delhi. air pollution
A man rides his bicycle in front of the India Gate shrouded in smog in New Delhi, Dec. 26, 2018. VOA

CSE deputy director general Chandra Bhushan said: “The pilot study will come out with signatures to identify the major sources of pollution in real time. Once we have established the signatures for various sources of pollution, the real-time elemental analysis will help us identify the source of pollution in an area, which will then help regulators in taking corrective action quickly.”

The study will be carried out using a ‘Real-time PM and Elemental Analyzer PX-375’, which is a product of Horiba, and gives a continuous analysis of PM2.5 concentration and its elemental composition.

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The technology used for monitoring PM2.5 is Beta-Ray Attenuation; the elemental analysis would be done using X-ray fluorescence technology. The instrument for the study will be co-located with the DPCC’s continuous air pollution monitoring stations.

“This is an opportunity to move from static one-time source apportionment to dynamic source identification and realtime mitigation. It can inform the ongoing efforts and processes to implement the Graded Response Action Plan (GRAP) and the Comprehensive Action Plan (CAP) for a more effective impact,” Anumita Roychowdhury, executive director-research and advocacy, CSE said in a statement. (IANS)

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Air quality Improves in Delhi After Several Years

Delhi's air quality improves to 'Good', best in years

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air quality
According to the System of Air Quality and Weather Forecasting (Safar) and the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB), the overall air quality index (AQI) of Delhi, which was at 47, falling in the good category. Pixabay

Delhi hasn’t breathed this clean in years. Rainfall in and around brought the capital’s air quality on Saturday to the “good” condition, while PM 2.5 levels, recorded at 15 by the US Embassy and 17 by Safar, were the lowest in this year.

According to the System of Air Quality and Weather Forecasting (Safar) and the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB), the overall air quality index (AQI) of Delhi, which was at 47, falling in the good category.

The level of PM2.5 was recorded at 17 and the PM10 level was recorded at 31 on Saturday, Safar said. These denote levels of particulate matter, of two sizes up to 2.5 and 10 micrometres in diameter, in the atmosphere. In comparison, the AQI in New York was recorded at “good” at 17, at 34 in Frankfurt, while in London, it was “moderate” at 52.

A CPCB scientist said that in 2017, the city had witnessed the AQI recorded below 50 – at 42, but could not recall the exact date. The CPCB is recording AQI since 2015 and such good conditions have not been seen in the last four years.

Gufran Baig, scientist and programme director, SAFAR, said that this is the lowest AQI recorded this year and it will remain good for another two to three days. He said that the air quality has improved due to widespread rain received in the northern parts of the country.

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The air quality has improved due to widespread rain received in the northern parts of the country. Pixabay

“Rajasthan, Himachal Pradesh, Punjab, Haryana and Uttar Pradesh, all areas surrounding are receiving a good amount of rainfall this year which is improving the air condition in the city. Such kind of rain was never received earlier so the air quality has never reached this level,” Baig said.

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Mahesh Palawat, Vice President, Meteorology and Climate Change, at private forecaster Skymet Weather told IANS that this was the longest spell of clean air experienced by Delhiites.

“The widespread rain has helped in improving air quality in Delhi as well as in Noida and Gurugram. Increased rainfall activity is likely to bring more respite in coming days,” he said, adding that the rain has helped in settling down pollutants. (IANS)