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Dalit women who got jailed for ‘beating up CPI-M men’, gets bail in Kerala

On Friday, June 17, Thalassery Police presented Akhila and Anjana before a court that sent the two siblings and Akhila's 18-month-old baby to jail

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Dalit Women. Image source: dalitwomencaucus.blogspot.com
  • On Friday, Thalassery Police presented Akhila and Anjana before a court that sent the two siblings and Akhila’s 18-month-old baby to jail
  • The Congress party accused the ruling party of misusing power to send the two Dalit women to jail on false charges
  • CPI-M legislator A.M. Shamsheer said the two women trespassed into their party office and the law took its course

KERALA: A court here in Kerala on Saturday, June 18 granted bail to two Dalit women who were sent to jail on Friday for “trespassing into Communist Party of India-Marxist (CPI-M) office and beating up two party men”.

The Congress party, however, accused the ruling party of misusing power to send the two Dalit women — Akhila, 30, and her 25-year-old sister Anjana — to jail on false charges.

“The conditional bail has been given to the women and every Saturday, they have to report before the probe official and have to surrender their passport,” the counsel for the two women told reporters here.

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On Friday, June 17, Thalassery Police presented Akhila and Anjana before a court that sent the two siblings and Akhila’s 18-month-old baby to jail.

Dalit women in South India. Image source: dalitskerala.wordpress.com
Dalit women in South India. Image source: dalitskerala.wordpress.com

This case has by now drawn national attention with the media taking it up in a big way and the National Commission for Scheduled Caste looking into it as well.

“This is the biggest joke, such a thing never happened… and that too, two hapless young women beating up CPI-M men at their office. These are absolutely ridiculous and baseless allegations,” the Congress party’s Kerala unit president V.M. Sudheeran said while addressing a party function in Thiruvananthapuram.

Later, addressing reporters in Thiruvananthapuram, Sudheeran said the officials who acted at the behest of the CPI-M leaders should be taken to task for this act.

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Minister for Culture and SC/ST A.K. Balan told reporters in Delhi that they will look into the matter and see if anything wrong was done.

CPI-M state secretary Kodiyeri Balakrishnan said “this is the ploy of the Congress party to see that through all this, they can get into the good books of the community by targeting us”.

“The bail application could have been moved on Friday, but none of the Congress people wanted to do so,” said Balakrishnan.

Akhila and Anjana are daughters of Congress leader N. Rajan and his family has come under frequent fire from the CPI-M leaders after he contested last year’s local body election against a top CPI-M leader at Thalassery.

“They went to the CPI-M office to plead with those present there to leave them alone and not make them a subject of ridicule as they have been mentally harassed for long,” said Kannur district Congress president K. Surendran.

CPI-M legislator A.M. Shamsheer, who represents Thalassery constituency, said the two women trespassed into their party office and the law took its course. (IANS)

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Young Women More Likely to Depend on Alcohol to Improve Mental Health: Researchers

The study also tells that young women are more affected by alcohol use than men

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A recent study tells that young women appear to be more affected by high alcohol use than me leading to less interest in academics. Pixabay

Female college students are more likely to depend on drinking alcohol to improve mental well-being, say, researchers, adding that the young women appear to be more affected by high alcohol use than men, which may lead to less interest in academics.

“Cognitive aptitudes of young women appear to be more affected than for men with high alcohol use,” said study lead author Lina Begdache, Assistant Professor at Binghamton University in the US.

“These behaviors are regulated by the limbic system of the brain. However, the cognitive functions for high drinking alcohol use among the young men and women were different,” Begdache added.

For the findings, published in the journal Trends in Neuroscience and Education, researchers sought to compare neurobehaviours and academic effort among college students with low alcohol use with those of high alcohol consumption and build conceptual models that represent the integration of the different variables.

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The study found that young men and women exhibit common behavioural responses to high alcohol. Pixabay

They sent an anonymous survey to assess college students’ alcohol use and frequency along with questions on sleep, academic performance and attitude toward learning. They compared gender responses and found that both young men and women exhibit common behavioural responses to high alcohol use such as abuse of other substances and risk-taking.

The findings showed that young women reported generally less interest in the academic work and performance than young men. The latter reported more risky behaviours, such as being arrested, from excessive drinking.

The study also found that young women are more likely to depend on alcohol to improve mental well-being, which is also concerning, as they may self-medicate through drinking. In both genders, the researchers reported an increase in impulsive behaviours, which are under the control of the limbic system (the oldest part of the brain, evolutionary speaking).

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The study also found that young women are more likely to depend on alcohol to improve mental well-being. Pixabay

Also Read: Young Scientist Develops Panic Button to Tackle Domestic Violence

Another reason for the difference seen is the differential metabolism of alcohol. Women metabolise alcohol at a slower rate, therefore, they are more likely to feel the effect of alcohol. Consequently, their brain is more likely to accumulate a toxic metabolite, acetaldehyde, which may be altering brain chemistry further to add to the differential behaviours identified in this study.

“Academic performance and risky behaviours among college students may be linked to their drinking habits, so more education and awareness should be shared with college students,” said Begdache.

“These findings are also explained by the fact that women tend to have higher connectivity between cortices, while men have a large cortical volume in the areas on the limbic system that support impulsivity,” Begdache added. (IANS)

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Young Scientist Develops Panic Button to Tackle Domestic Violence

If a distressed woman presses the button then it would alert the police or people nearby about violence

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A panic button has been developed to tackle crime against women. Pixabay

By Vivek Tripathi

The panic button, devised by an electronics and communication engineer, is set to play an important role in tackling domestic violence. On being pressed, it would alert the police or people nearby about violence.

Developed by young scientist Anjali Srivastava, the device uses GPS (Global Positioning System) technology.

Anjali, who has made several such tools, told IANS one to five emergency panic buttons could be added to it. “It operates in a 100-metre range and is too tiny to be noticed. Its battery last nearly 8 months. Women can keep the button that costs Rs 2,500 anywhere in the house as per their convenience,” she said.

It also has an audio-recording option, which could later serve as evidence. It could be used by housewives and girls living in paying guest (PG) accommodations.

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The button uses GPS to track the location of the victim. Pixabay

Also Read: Nearly Half Urban Indians to Shop Online After Lockdown: Survey

“This type of innovative devices helps prevent crime against women,” said Gorakhpur scientific officer Mahadev Pandey.

“Anjali has made many such devices in the past, including anti-rape jeans and shocking gloves. This device is very important for the safety of women. It will prove to be very effective, especially in the coronavirus time,” said Shyam Cherasia, research and development in-charge of Ashoka Institute of Technology and Management.

GPS, a radio navigation system, allows land, sea, and airborne users to determine their exact location, velocity, and time 24 hours a day, in all weather conditions, anywhere in the world. (IANS)

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61% Indian Business Leaders Fear Cybercrime Risk During Covid-19

61% of Indian business owners think their business may experience cybercrime during Covid-19

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SMBs believe that cybercrime is more likely to occur during Covid-19 situation than before. Pixabay

About 61 per cent of Indian business leaders and decision-makers think their business is more likely to experience a serious cybercrime during the Covid-19 situation as opposed to 45 per cent globally, said a survey on Tuesday.

About a third of small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs) believe that cybecrime is more likely to occur during Covid-19 situation than before, showed the study by US-based cybersecurity company CrowdStrike.

From February to March alone, CrowdStrike found that there was a 100x increase in Covid-19 themed malicious files.

Interestingly 62 per cent of Indian businesses surveyed, the highest among all the countries surveyed, provided additional training for their staff to learn how to avoid threats and Cybercrime while working from home.

The “CrowdStrike Work Security Index” surveyed 4,048 senior decision-makers in India, Australia, France, Germany, Great Britain, Japan, Netherlands, Singapore, and the U.S across major industry sectors.

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62 per cent of Indian businesses surveyed provided additional training for their staff to learn how to avoid threats while working from home. Pixabay

The survey looked into the attitudes and behaviours towards cybersecurity during the Covid-19 situation.

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It included responses from 526 Indian decision-makers across small, medium and large business enterprises.

The survey revealed that a large majority of respondents around the globe are now working remotely, with more than half of them working remotely directly as a result of the pandemic.

This, in turn has given rise to the use of personal devices, including laptops and mobile devices, for work purposes, with 60 per cent of respondents reporting that they are using personal devices to complete work — with countries like Singapore and India even reaching 70 per cent or higher in personal device usage. (IANS)