Friday October 18, 2019

Dandruff in Hair Cause Of Worry for Patients With IBD

While most studies on the microbiome focus on bacteria, Underhill's team investigates the fungi's presence and its potential role in intestinal disease.

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health
Crohn's disease is a type of IBD that causes inflammation of the digestive tract, leading to abdominal pain, diarrohea, fatigue, weight loss and malnutrition. Pixabay

A fungus linked to dandruff in the hair may worsen intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in patients with a certain genetic makeup, new research has found.

Malassezia restricta yeasts found in oily skin and scalp follicles are linked to several skin conditions. These microscopic fungi also often end up in the gut.

In particular, M. restricta was elevated in Crohn’s patients carrying a genetic variation known as the IBD CARD9 risk allele, according to the study published in the journal Cell Host & Microbe.

fungus
While most studies on the microbiome focus on bacteria, Underhill’s team investigates the fungi’s presence and its potential role in intestinal disease. Pixabay

Crohn’s disease is a type of IBD that causes inflammation of the digestive tract, leading to abdominal pain, diarrohea, fatigue, weight loss and malnutrition.

“We were surprised to find that Malassezia restrica was more common on intestinal tissue surfaces in Crohn’s disease patients than in healthy people,” said study co-author David Underhill from the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

“Further, the presence of Malassezia was linked to a common variation in a gene known to be important for immunity to fungi – a genetic signature more common in patients with Crohn’s disease than the healthy population,” Underhill said.

hair
A fungus linked to dandruff in the hair may worsen intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in patients with a certain genetic makeup, new research has found. Pixabay

IBD is characterised by changes in immune responses to the intestinal microbiome.

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While most studies on the microbiome focus on bacteria, Underhill’s team investigates the fungi’s presence and its potential role in intestinal disease.

Changes in intestinal fungi such as M. restricta – and host responses to these fungi – may be a factor in exacerbating symptoms that contribute to disease in a subset of patients with Crohn’s disease, said co-author Jose Limon, a Cedars-Sinai research team member. (IANS)

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Here’s How A Wearable Device Can Regrow Hair On Bald Head

There is good news for people experiencing hair loss as researchers have developed a wearable device that harnesses energy from the wearer

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hair, lifestyle, beauty, baldness, hair fall
The devices are powered by the movement of the wearer, they do not require a bulky battery pack or complicated electronics. Pixabay

There is good news for people experiencing hair loss as researchers have developed a wearable device that harnesses energy from the wearer and delivers gentle electric pulses to stimulate dormant hair follicles and regrow hair.

Because the devices are powered by the movement of the wearer, they do not require a bulky battery pack or complicated electronics.

In fact, they are so low-profile that they could be discreetly worn underneath the crown of an everyday baseball cap.

“I think this will be a very practical solution to hair regeneration,” said one of the researchers Xudong Wang, Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the US.

In side-by-side tests on hairless mice, the devices stimulated hair growth just as effectively as two different compounds found in baldness medicines, said the study published in the journal ACS Nano.

hair, lifestyle, beauty, baldness, hair fall
There is good news for people experiencing hair loss as researchers have developed a wearable device. Wikimedia Commons

Based on devices that gather energy from a body’s day-to-day motion, the hair growth technology stimulates the skin with gentle, low-frequency electric pulses, which coax dormant follicles to reactivate hair production.

The devices do not cause hair follicles to sprout anew in smooth skin. Instead they reactivate hair-producing structures that have gone dormant.

That means they could be used as an intervention for people in the early stages of pattern baldness, but they would not bestow cascading tresses to someone who has been as bald as a billiard ball for several years.

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Explaining the hair-growth technology, the researchers said that small devices called nanogenerators passively gather energy from day-to-day movements and then transmit low-frequency pulses of electricity to the skin. That gentle electric stimulation causes dormant follicles to “wake up.”

“Electric stimulations can help many different body functions,” Wang said.

“But before our work there was no really good solution for low-profile devices that provide gentle but effective stimulations,” Wang said. (IANS)