Monday April 22, 2019
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Dell Unveils New Gaming Laptops And AIOs In Its Inspiron Series

The Inspiron AIO carries a 4GB "GDDR5 NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050".

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Dell India launches 2 new 'Inspiron' laptops. Pixabay

Dell India on Thursday launched new laptops in its “Alienware” series, high-performance gaming “G Series” and All-in-Ones (AIOs) in its Inspiron series.

Dell “G3 15” gaming laptop will be availale at a starting price of Rs 80,990 from July 13, Dell “G7 15” gaming laptop will be available at a starting price of Rs 1,24,690 while the price of Alienware 15 laptop starts at Rs 1,46,890.

The price of Alienware 17 laptop starts at Rs 2,08,790 while “Inspiron 24 5000” AIO at Rs 91,690.

“Dell earned the trust of our consumers as the ‘most trusted brand’ in 2018. It is our responsibility to maintain the trust with the best in all categories of PCs we operate in,” P. Krishnakumar, Senior Vice President and General Manager-Consumer and Small Business, Dell India, said in a statement.

“Dell continues to work towards being in the top consideration set for all kinds of gamers and gaming communities,” Krishnakumar added.

The 15-inch Dell “G3” is powered with 8th Gen Intel processors and NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 TI.

Dell laptops
Dell laptops. Representational image, Pixabay

Dell “G7” features 8th Gen Intel core i9 processors, NVIDIA GeForce GTX up to 1060 with “Max-Q” design technology.

The Inspiron AIO carries a 4GB “GDDR5 NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050”.

Also read: Dell Technologies Accelerates Partner Business Growth with Broader Offerings

Alienware 15 and 17 are built with premium materials and feature 8th Gen Intel Core i9 k-Series processors and NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080. (IANS)

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Study Reveals, Screen Time Before Bed May Not Effect Well-Being in Adolescents

For the study, the team analysed data from Ireland, the US, and the UK and used a rigorous methodology to gather how much time an adolescent spends on screens per day, including both self-reported measures and time-use diaries. 

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The research examined more than 17,000 teenagers and found that adolescents' total screen time per day had little impact on their mental health, both on weekends and weekdays. Pixabay

Spending time online, gaming or watching TV, especially before bedtime, may not damage young people’s mental health, finds a new research challenging previous notions on screen time.

The study, published in Psychological Science journal, casts doubt on the widely-accepted relationship between screen time and well-being in adolescents.

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“We found little clear-cut evidence that screen time decreases adolescent well-being, even if the use of digital technology occurs directly before bedtime,” added Professor Andrew Przybylski, at the University of Oxford. Pixabay

The research examined more than 17,000 teenagers and found that adolescents’ total screen time per day had little impact on their mental health, both on weekends and weekdays.

It also found that the use of digital screens 2 hours, 1 hour or 30 minutes before bedtime didn’t have clear associations with a decrease in adolescent well-being, even though this is often taken as a fact by media reports and public debates.

“We found little clear-cut evidence that screen time decreases adolescent well-being, even if the use of digital technology occurs directly before bedtime,” added Professor Andrew Przybylski, at the University of Oxford.

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It also found that the use of digital screens 2 hours, 1 hour or 30 minutes before bedtime didn’t have clear associations with a decrease in adolescent well-being, even though this is often taken as a fact by media reports and public debates.
Pixabay

Also Read: Think Twice Before Smoking, It is Slowly Turning You Blind

For the study, the team analysed data from Ireland, the US, and the UK and used a rigorous methodology to gather how much time an adolescent spends on screens per day, including both self-reported measures and time-use diaries.

“Implementing best practice statistical and methodological techniques, we found little evidence for substantial negative associations between digital-screen engagement and adolescent well-being,” said Amy Orben, researcher at the varsity. (IANS)