Thursday July 19, 2018

Digital Games may Improve Mental Health, boost their Academics in Refugee Kids in War-Torn Regions

The study participants included 147 Syrian refugee children, aged 9 to 14

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Refugee Kids
Refugee Kids: Children, who fled fighting in South Sudan, stand inside a tented classroom at the Bidi Bidi refugee resettlement camp near the border with South Sudan, in northern Uganda, Dec. 7, 2016. VOA
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  • The study participants included 147 Syrian refugee children, aged 9 to 14
  • Digital games may help boost their academics as well as improve their mental health
  • Play based intervention was not only effective but also one in which the children were engaged and wanted to continue doing

New York, June 7, 2017: Providing technological interventions such as digital games to children living as refugees in warn-torn regions may help boost their academics as well as improve their mental health, a research has found.

Refugee children often do not enroll in the education system partly because of language barriers, and they often suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression.

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The findings showed that digital games can effectively teach refugee children much-needed skills including a new language, cognitive skills, while also improving their mental health.

“The study shows that even with limited resources, and language barriers, we can make a difference in the lives of children through leveraging technology,” said Selcuk Sirin, Professor at the New York University.

The games also improved children’s executive functions and cognitive skills such as their ability to plan, monitor, and alter behaviours.

In addition, the intervention significantly lowered children’s sense of hopelessness and despair.

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The study participants included 147 Syrian refugee children, aged 9 to 14.

Play based intervention was not only effective but also one in which the children were engaged and wanted to continue doing, the researchers suggested, while presenting the paper at the BAU International University in Washington, DC.

“Our pilot study shows that using game-based learning is an effective, cost-efficient way to teach refugee children important skills and this structured environment provided distressed refugee children an outlet to imagine a better future for themselves,” explained Sinem Vatanartiran, president of BAU International University. (IANS)

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WHO Adds ‘Gaming Disorder’ In The List Of Mental Health Condition

Gaming disorder has been added to the section on addictive disorders

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WHO Added 'Gaming Disorder' In The List Of Mental Health Condition
These Games Will Surely Give You Wanderlust. Pixabay

The World Health Organization (WHO) has now included “gaming disorder” as a mental health condition in its International Classification of Diseases (ICD).

The ICD, a diagnostic manual published by the WHO, was last updated in 1990 and its new edition, ICD-11, has included gaming disorder as a serious health condition that needs to be monitored.

“Gaming disorder has been added to the section on addictive disorders,” the WHO said in a statement.

This classification means health professionals and systems will be more “alerted to the existence of this condition” while boosting the possibility that “people who suffer from these conditions can get appropriate help”, Vladimir Poznyak, a member of the WHO’s Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, was quoted as telling the CNN.

“Millions of gamers around the world, even when it comes to the intense gaming, would never qualify as people suffering from gaming disorder,” he said, adding that the overall prevalence of this condition is “very low”.

“And let me emphasise that this is a clinical condition, and clinical diagnosis can be made only by health professionals which are properly trained to do that,” he noted.

The new ICD-11 is also able to better capture data regarding safety in healthcare, which means that unnecessary events that may harm health — such as unsafe workflows in hospitals — can be identified and reduced, the statement said.

It also includes new chapters, one on traditional medicine: although millions of people use traditional medicine worldwide, it has never been classified in this system.

children Playing game on Laptop
children Playing game on Laptop, Pixabya

Another new chapter on sexual health brings together conditions that were previously categorised in other ways (e.g. gender incongruence was listed under mental health conditions) or described differently.

ICD-11 will be presented at the World Health Assembly in May 2019 for adoption by member states, and will come into effect on January 1, 2022.

“ICD is a cornerstone of health information and ICD-11 will deliver an up-to-date view of the patterns of disease,” said Lubna Alansari, WHO’s Assistant Director-General (Health Metrics and Measurement).

The ICD is the foundation for identifying health trends and statistics worldwide, and contains around 55,000 unique codes for injuries, diseases and causes of death.

Gaming T.v
Gaming T.v, Pixabay

Also read: ASUS Expands its Gaming Laptop line-up in India

It provides a common language that allows health professionals to share health information across the globe. (IANS)