Tuesday June 18, 2019

Do You Have A Sweet Tooth? Know How High-Calorie Desserts Can Lead to Healthier Meals

Choosing these high-calorie options first might help you opt for a healthier meal later, says a new research.

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We believe diners who chose the indulgent dessert first then picked healthier main and side dishes to make up for their high-calorie dessert. Pixabay

Do red velvet cheesecake, french fries or fish fries entice you but you refrain from eating those owing to the high-calories they contain? Take heart.

Choosing these high-calorie options first might help you opt for a healthier meal later, says a new research.

The study showed choosing indulgent dessert first may lead to eating lower-calorie meals.

“We believe diners who chose the indulgent dessert first then picked healthier main and side dishes to make up for their high-calorie dessert.

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Choosing these high-calorie options first might help you opt for a healthier meal later, says a new research. Pixabay

“Diners who picked the healthier dessert may have thought they already had done a good deed for their bodies so they deserved higher-calorie food further down the cafeteria line,” said Martin Reimann, Assistant Professor at the University of Arizona in the US.

The experiment was conducted in the cafeteria of the EGADE Business School at the Tecnológico de Monterrey in Monterrey, Mexico.

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Diners who picked the healthier dessert may have thought they already had done a good deed for their bodies. Pixabay

For the study, researchers included 134 diners aged between 18 and 60 with an average age of 32.

They placed either a healthy or less healthy dessert (fresh fruit versus lemon cheesecake).

There were also healthy and less healthy main and side dishes including grilled chicken fajitas and a small salad or fried fish and french fries.

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The findings, published by the American Psychological Association, showed that diners who chose the cheesecake first, were twice as likely to order the lighter main dish later and ultimately consumed fewer calories than diners who chose the fresh fruit first.

“People should be aware that their initial food choices and their mindset may affect the overall healthiness of their meals,” suggested Reimann. (IANS)

Next Story

When You Engage in ‘Hedonic Consumption’? Read Here To Find Out

"Emotional consumption is usually food because it's easily accessible and available to most people,"

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Some research suggests "hedonic consumption" doesn't help because it could lead to a vicious cycle of eating unhealthily and its associated guilt factors. Pixabay

If you start binging on fast food, savour dark chocolates or can’t resist that ice cream, this may be because of an emotional event like a recent break-up as there is science behind this behaviour, says a study.

Reacting to emotional events like break-ups, tends to involve reaching for the nearest unhealthy snack which is called “hedonic consumption”, said Nitika Garg, Associate Professor of Marketing at the University of New South Wales’ (UNSW) at Sydney Business School.

“When you engage in ‘hedonic consumption’, you always have some kind of emotion attached to it,” she added.

When you’re sad, you tend to go for overconsumption – hedonic consumption – as therapy.

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“We tend to focus on sadness and what it does to consumption but there’s also this unexpected good effect of happiness,” Garg suggested. Pixabay

“Be it ice cream or a luxury handbag, there are always emotions attached,” Garg said.

Research shows when people are made aware of emotion effects, they go away.

“One of the mechanisms to curbing hedonic consumption is making people aware of the behaviour by providing nutritional information,” Garg noted.

On the flip side, experiencing happiness actually curbs the consumption of unhealthy food products.

“Happiness is shown to increase the consumption of products people believe to be healthy,” said the professor.

In her research, the UNSW academic offered both M&M chocolates and sweet dried fruit sultanas to happy and sad people.

She found that happy people don’t eat M&Ms but they do eat sultanas a lot more.

“We tend to focus on sadness and what it does to consumption but there’s also this unexpected good effect of happiness,” Garg suggested.

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When you’re sad, you tend to go for overconsumption – hedonic consumption – as therapy. Pixabay

Some research suggests “hedonic consumption” doesn’t help because it could lead to a vicious cycle of eating unhealthily and its associated guilt factors.

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“Emotional consumption is usually food because it’s easily accessible and available to most people,” said Garg who received a PhD from the University of Pittsburgh and MBA from IIM-Ahmedabad.

“People go for what seems easiest to them in terms of familiarity and in terms of accessibility for ‘hedonic consumption’,” the professor added. (IANS)