Tuesday July 17, 2018
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Does Suspending Students From The Class Work?

The college and faculty should devise a program that lets students freely interact with the teaching staff about their concerns as SUSPENSION of students is not at all a solution

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Suspension of students may lead to behavioural issues. Pixabay
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Some BBA colleges believe that suspending students from class instils discipline
and in return changes their behaviour. However, this approach is not the right way to
fix problems. Especially, when they have just entered adulthood and are on the
verge of either making or breaking their life. Faculty members should try and dig out
the reason that’s triggering inappropriate behaviour in students. The questions they
need to ask themselves is why they are not learning and why they are showcasing a
weird behaviour. Faculty members must understand that suspension does not fix
behavioural issues, it often makes it worse. For example, MBA, B. Tech and BBA subjects are comprehensive and suspending a student from any of the classes will
make them lose interest in the particular subject. This loss of interest will hamper
grades as the student will not be able to cover the losses due to suspension.

How To Understand the causes of inappropriate behaviour

Faculty members must understand the cause behind inappropriate behaviour with an
aim to guide the students. Behavioural issues can be because of multiple reasons,
some of them include:
 Frustration due to inability to understand the subject
 They are made to feel inadequate
 Unintentionally or intentionally students/teachers are picking on them
 Their efforts are not appreciated
 Biased behaviour of faculty (favouritism)

Suspension may lead to depression.
Suspension may lead to depression. Pixabay

Let’s look why suspension does not work if the student is under any of the above-
mentioned mental state.

Decreased Confidence

With every suspension, students start losing confidence and start believing they are
good for nothing. Even if they wish to give a genuine try, the thought of another
suspension keeps them away from attending classes. Furthermore, they also start
feeling humiliated in front of those who never get suspended and score well. Instead
of suspension, the faculty should sit and have a weekly session with rule-abiding
students to understand what leads to such behavioural issues.

Increased Rebellious Attitude

Faculty members must understand that repeat suspensions instil a rebellious attitude
in students and they might skip the classes for the entire semester. The approach
will not only affect their attendance but their grades as well. The higher the number
of suspensions the lower the scores. Thus, the faculty should maintain a low rate of
suspensions to have no impact on the scores and performance of the suspended
students.

They Become Habitual

The faculty members think that suspension is one of the best ways to handle
disciplinary actions. It might be true in some cases, but one of the most significant
disadvantages it carries with itself is that students become habitual of the suspension. Instead of taking it as a punishment for their betterment, they start
looking forward to suspension so that they can have a great time loitering around the
campus or chilling with friends in the canteen. Here again comes the importance of
maintaining a low rate of suspensions for effective results.

Also Read: 4 Health Tips To Help Students Perform Well In Exam Season

A Close Look at Suspensions

Though suspension seems to be the right choice to change a student’s behaviour, is
the result even effective? Do students fear the suspension? Do they feel sorry about
being regularly suspended? Well, these are the questions faculty members should
keep in mind before they go ahead and suspend any student. As a solution, they
should make the students understand that all this is being done with an aim to help
them. The college and faculty should devise a program that lets students freely
interact with the teaching staff about their concerns. That is the key. Students should
feel that they are an essential part of the education system – they should feel
wanted.

 

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Union Government Appoints Committee For A New Education Policy

The Article 30 of the Constitution gives religious and linguistic minorities “the right to establish and administer educational institutions of their choice.”

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Union Government Appoints Committee For A New Education Policy
Union Government Appoints Committee For A New Education Policy. Pixabay

The Union government has appointed a Committee, headed by K Kasturirangan, to work on a New Education Policy. The Committee is yet to submit its recommendations. Meanwhile, the government is contemplating to replace the six-decade old University Grants Commission (UGC) — a regulating authority that failed to check the rot in Higher Education. Prakash Javadekar, HRD Minister, intends to pilot the Higher Education Commission of India (Repeal of UGC Act) Bill in this monsoon session of Parliament, commencing from July 18.

The Bill proposes to delink funding of educational institutions from the regulating body, HRD Ministry itself taking over the responsibility, as the Higher Education Secretary R Subramanyam put it, “the UGC remains preoccupied with disbursing funds to institutes and is unable to concentrate on other key areas such as mentoring institutes, focusing on research to be undertaken and other quality measures.” To placate the apprehensions of the academics, a subsequent press release of the Ministry has assured, “if there is a successor system to the current grant-giving role of the UGC, the same will be operated in the most unbiased and impartial manner.” Some other proposals, inter alia, include (a) universities to get authorisation from the Higher Education Commission of India (HECI) before awarding degrees; (b) the HECI to focus on promoting academic excellence and maintaining standards; and (c) closing down fake and sub-standard institutions. Education in general and higher education, in particular, requires fundamental reforms, not cosmetic changes.

First, it is important to raise the standard of schools, run by Panchayat Institutes and Municipal bodies, to the level of Kendriya Vidyalayas. The policy of teaching in mother tongue has altered the very thrust of education. The three language formula is not observed, neglecting the official languages — Hindi and English. It is not a question of preserving regional languages. The regional languages are promoting linguistic chauvinism, resulting in communication barrier. A student from Tamil Nadu, studying in Tamil medium, cannot communicate with a student from UP, studying in Hindi, and vice versa. The students are paying the price for this short sighted policy of States. The teaching in mother tongue has practically immobilised them, affecting their higher studies and job opportunities. Besides, most of the government schools do not have basic amenities and infrastructure. This is aggravated by mass absenteeism of teachers, due to corruption and ineffective supervision and control. How redundant is education could be gauged from a recent recruitment of police constables in Maharashtra. For some 1100 police vacancies, over 2 lakh applicants, including doctors, engineers, MBAs and lawyers, have applied. Arup Patnaik, former Mumbai Police Commissioner says, “The problem with qualified youth from rural areas is that they are unable to communicate in English and hence are unable to bag jobs in the private sector…it is a sad reflection of our times…” A crash course for English language should be made mandatory at the first year of College, exclusively for the students from vernacular medium, to improve their reading, speaking and writing skills. Unless the quality of primary and secondary education is improved, the products of our colleges and universities will not be able to gain productive employment.

Second, our education system encourages rote learning with emphasises only on marks. There is a need to de-emphasise on rote learning and encourage critical thinking. Make the teaching and learning a matter of joy and happiness. The school curriculum should be overhauled to imbibe human values like truth, righteous conduct, gender equality and democratic principles of equality, tolerance and respect for dissent and diversity. As S Radhakrishnan, one of the finest teachers the modern world has seen, said, “The values of human life must come from two sources: parents and teachers. They are the makers of an evolved society.” The School is an important agent of socialisation.

Third, privatisation has made the education unaffordable to the poor and marginalised. It has resulted in commercialisation and profiting the managements. More than 60% students in Higher Education are studying in private institutions. There is mushrooming of engineering colleges, having no infrastructure and qualified teachers, with 50% seats going vacant. The teachers in private unaided institutions do not enjoy the protection of service conditions. They are paid a pittance, seriously affecting the quality of teaching. While cutting grants to educational institutions, the government is promoting contractual appointment of teachers, making the teaching profession exploitative and unattractive. The privatisation should be confined to certain professional courses. The bulk of students in Arts, Science and Commerce streams cannot afford private education.

The Article 30 of the Constitution gives religious and linguistic minorities “the right to establish and administer educational institutions of their choice.”
The Article 30 of the Constitution gives religious and linguistic minorities “the right to establish and administer educational institutions of their choice.” Pixabay

Fourth, revisit the policy of admission. Education is an instrument of social mobility. Therefore, quality education must be accessible to all. The Article 30 of the Constitution gives religious and linguistic minorities “the right to establish and administer educational institutions of their choice.” This makes the minority institutions to reserve 50% seats to the members of their community, changing the character of educational institutions, making them non-liberal and exclusive centres of learning. Why not open admission to all students, banning admission based on religion, caste and language, except for SC and ST? This does not amount to denying the minorities the right to establish and administer educational institutions.

Fifth, depoliticise the educational institutions. The appointments of top functionaries of institutions should be made on merit basis, not on regional and caste considerations. Today, most of the appointments in universities and academic bodies are made on the ideological basis, eroding the academic autonomy and the freedom to explore ideas and knowledge. As Prof Arun Kumar says, “those not catering to the markets would be marginalised and the generation of the socially relevant knowledge would decline.” Educational institutions need freedom from political controls, if they have to excel and perform to their full potential. Allahabad University was once known as the Oxford of the East. Banaras Hindu University and Shanti Niketan were compared to Gurukuls. Delhi University was renowned for its classicism and Jawaharlal Nehru University for its progressive values. They flourished as premier public institutions because of autonomy.

Also read: Indian design schools Are Influenced By Global education

And no regulating authority will be able to ensure quality and maintain standards unless its Head and his team enjoy freedom of action and have the courage to enforce the norms and take punitive action against the erring institutions without fear or favour. (IANS)