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Donald Trump Presidency likely to spark “Brain Drain” as Foreign-born Researchers Educated in American Universities may leave Country

57.11 per cent, believe that the president-elect will hurt research funding of Health (NIH), a public biomedical research facility

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New York, November 12, 2016: Adding to the anxiety that the US Presidential election results have caused, a large number of scientists in the country, according to a survey, now fear that a Donald Trump presidency might spark a “brain drain” as foreign-born researchers educated in American universities will be more likely to leave the country.

Thousands of people all across the US marched down the streets and inter-states opposing Republican Donald Trump’s victory in the presidential election, the media reports said.

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According to the survey of more than 1,600 professionals, from industry and academia, 46.78 per cent believe that during the reign of Trump scientists born in other countries but educated in the US will be more likely to make an exit.

On other hand, 49.81 per cent opined that overseas researchers will still seek academic positions or jobs in the US biotech industry, while 30.21 per cent said they were uncertain, and 19.97 per cent, disagreed.

“The biotechnology industry faces the possibility of a brain drain, and this is most alarming,” said Mary Ann Liebert, founder and CEO of the the journal Genetic Engineering And Biotechnology News (GEN).

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Further, 57.11 per cent, believe that the president-elect will hurt research funding of Health (NIH) — a public biomedical research facility. As much as 24.26 per cent said it would not make a difference, and 9.79 per cent said Trump’s presidency would prove positive.

While 51.74 per cent, believe that science-technology-engineering-mathematics (STEM) education will not be a priority under a Trump administration, 29.25 per cent are uncertain.

However, 19.01 per cent believe that a Trump administration will focus attention on STEM education, as during the campaign to the White House, Trump had hinted at possible support for higher NIH budgets, even as he has called for cutting federal spending.

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“We must make the commitment to invest in science, engineering, healthcare and other areas that will make the lives of Americans better, safer and more prosperous,” Trump had said.

Whether Trump will make measures that benefit biopharma industry, remains uncertain, the researchers noted in the journal Genetic Engineering And Biotechnolgy News. (IANS)

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U.S. President Donald Trump Vetoes Measure to End U..S Involvement in Yemen War

ump issued his first veto last month on legislation related to immigration. Trump had declared a national emergency so he could use more money to construct a border wall. Congress voted to block the emergency declaration and Trump vetoed that measure.

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Men inspect the site of an airstrike by Saudi-led coalition in Sanaa, Yemen, April 10, 2019. VOA

President Donald Trump on Wednesday vetoed a bill passed by Congress to end U.S. military assistance in Saudi Arabia’s war in Yemen.

In a break with the president, Congress voted for the first time earlier this month to invoke the War Powers Resolution to try to stop U.S. involvement in a foreign conflict.

The veto — the second in Trump’s presidency — was expected. Congress lacks the votes to override him.

“This resolution is an unnecessary, dangerous attempt to weaken my constitutional authorities, endangering the lives of American citizens and brave service members, both today and in the future,” Trump wrote in explaining his veto.

Congress has grown uneasy with Trump’s close relationship with Saudi Arabia as he tries to further isolate Iran, a regional rival.

Many lawmakers also criticized the president for not condemning Saudi Arabia for the killing of Jamal Khashoggi, a Saudi who lived in the United States and had written critically about the kingdom. Khashoggi went into the Saudi consulate in Istanbul last October and never came out. Intelligence agencies said Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman was complicit in the killing.

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Congress has grown uneasy with Trump’s close relationship with Saudi Arabia as he tries to further isolate Iran, a regional rival. VOA

The U.S. provides billions of dollars of arms to the Saudi-led coalition fighting against Iran-backed rebels in Yemen. Members of Congress have expressed concern about the thousands of civilians killed in coalition airstrikes since the conflict began in 2014. The fighting in the Arab world’s poorest country also has left millions suffering from food and medical care shortages and has pushed the country to the brink of famine.

House approval of the resolution came earlier this month on a 247-175 vote. The Senate vote last month was 54-46.

Democratic Rep. Eliot Engel of New York, chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, voted to end U.S. military assistance to the war, saying the humanitarian crisis in Yemen triggered “demands moral leadership.”

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President Donald Trump on Wednesday vetoed a bill passed by Congress to end U.S. military assistance in Saudi Arabia’s war in Yemen. VOA

The top Republican on the committee, Rep. Michael McCaul of Texas, acknowledged the dire situation in Yemen for civilians, but spoke out in opposition to the bill. McCaul said it was an abuse of the War Powers Resolution and predicted it could disrupt U.S. security cooperation agreements with more than 100 countries.

Also Read: Despite Tariff War With U.S, China’s Economic Growth is Steady

Trump issued his first veto last month on legislation related to immigration. Trump had declared a national emergency so he could use more money to construct a border wall. Congress voted to block the emergency declaration and Trump vetoed that measure. (VOA)