Wednesday February 19, 2020
Home Politics Donald Trump ...

Donald Trump Presidency likely to spark “Brain Drain” as Foreign-born Researchers Educated in American Universities may leave Country

57.11 per cent, believe that the president-elect will hurt research funding of Health (NIH), a public biomedical research facility

0
//
Representational image. Pixabay

New York, November 12, 2016: Adding to the anxiety that the US Presidential election results have caused, a large number of scientists in the country, according to a survey, now fear that a Donald Trump presidency might spark a “brain drain” as foreign-born researchers educated in American universities will be more likely to leave the country.

Thousands of people all across the US marched down the streets and inter-states opposing Republican Donald Trump’s victory in the presidential election, the media reports said.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

According to the survey of more than 1,600 professionals, from industry and academia, 46.78 per cent believe that during the reign of Trump scientists born in other countries but educated in the US will be more likely to make an exit.

On other hand, 49.81 per cent opined that overseas researchers will still seek academic positions or jobs in the US biotech industry, while 30.21 per cent said they were uncertain, and 19.97 per cent, disagreed.

“The biotechnology industry faces the possibility of a brain drain, and this is most alarming,” said Mary Ann Liebert, founder and CEO of the the journal Genetic Engineering And Biotechnology News (GEN).

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

Further, 57.11 per cent, believe that the president-elect will hurt research funding of Health (NIH) — a public biomedical research facility. As much as 24.26 per cent said it would not make a difference, and 9.79 per cent said Trump’s presidency would prove positive.

While 51.74 per cent, believe that science-technology-engineering-mathematics (STEM) education will not be a priority under a Trump administration, 29.25 per cent are uncertain.

However, 19.01 per cent believe that a Trump administration will focus attention on STEM education, as during the campaign to the White House, Trump had hinted at possible support for higher NIH budgets, even as he has called for cutting federal spending.

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

“We must make the commitment to invest in science, engineering, healthcare and other areas that will make the lives of Americans better, safer and more prosperous,” Trump had said.

Whether Trump will make measures that benefit biopharma industry, remains uncertain, the researchers noted in the journal Genetic Engineering And Biotechnolgy News. (IANS)

Next Story

Jupiter not as Dry as it was Predicted to be: NASA Scientists

Jupiter not as dry as earlier thought, reveals new NASA probe

0
Jupiter
Jupiter may not be as dry as earlier shown by a NASA probe, according to the first science. (Representational Image). Pixabay

The largest planet in our solar system may not be as dry as earlier shown by a NASA probe, according to the first science results revealed by the US space agency’s Juno mission on the amount of water in Jupiter’s atmosphere.

At the equator, water makes up about 0.25 per cent of the molecules in Jupiter’s atmosphere — almost three times that of the Sun, said the study published in the journal Nature Astronomy.

These are also the first findings on the gas giant’s abundance of water since NASA’s 1995 Galileo mission suggested Jupiter might be extremely dry compared to the Sun. The comparison is based not on liquid water but on the presence of its components, oxygen and hydrogen, present in the Sun.

“We found the water in the equator to be greater than what the Galileo probe measured,” said Cheng Li, a Juno scientist at the University of California, Berkeley. “Because the equatorial region is very unique at Jupiter, we need to compare these results with how much water is in other regions,” Li said.

An accurate estimate of the total amount of water in Jupiter’s atmosphere has been on the wish lists of planetary scientists for decades. The figure in the gas giant represents a critical missing piece to the puzzle of our solar system’s formation.

Jupiter
These are also the first findings on the gas giant’s abundance of water since NASA’s 1995 Galileo mission suggested Jupiter might be extremely dry compared to the Sun. (Representational Image). Pixabay

Jupiter was likely the first planet to form, and it contains most of the gas and dust that was not incorporated into the Sun.

Water abundance also has important implications for the gas giant’s meteorology (how wind currents flow on Jupiter) and internal structure. While lightning — a phenomenon typically fuelled by moisture — detected on Jupiter by Voyager and other spacecraft implied the presence of water, an accurate estimate of the amount of water deep within Jupiter’s atmosphere remained elusive.

Before the Galileo probe stopped transmitting 57 minutes into its Jovian descent in December 1995, it radioed out spectrometer measurements of the amount of water in the gas giant’s atmosphere down to a depth of about 120 kilometres. The scientists working on the data were dismayed to find ten times less water than expected.

Also Read- Intel Showcases 1st Cryogenic Quantum Control Chip Called “Horse Ridge”

A rotating, solar-powered spacecraft Juno was launched in 2011. Because of the Galileo probe experience, the mission seeks to obtain water abundance readings across large regions of the immense planet.

The Juno science team used data collected during Juno’s first eight science flybys of Jupiter to generate the findings. (IANS)