Friday November 15, 2019

Don’t Take Your Feet For granted, Treat Them To A Proper Pedicure

Sharad Kulkarni, in-house ayurvedic, and Shikhee Agrawal, head trainer at The Body Shop India, have listed the regime

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Don't Take Your Feet For granted Treat Them To A Proper Pedicure
Don't Take Your Feet For granted Treat Them To A Proper Pedicure, flickr

Don’t take your feet for granted. Treat them to a proper pedicure, with the right regime using the right products and tools, experts suggest.

Sharad Kulkarni, in-house ayurvedic doctor at Kama Ayurveda, and Shikhee Agrawal, head trainer at The Body Shop India, have listed the regime:

* File your toe nails well. Go bold with proper, neat and trimmed nails to attain all-out foot- care. File them nicely.

* Go for consistent pedicures as it helps get rid of dead and hard heel skin. Use a foot file, or a pumice stone to gently rub away the hard skin and apply quick moisturiser to soften the skin.

* Nourish the cuticles. Rub off dead skin growth from the corner of the nails and paint them up using an almond or coconut oil for proper nourishment and moisturised feet.

* Keep nail lacquers at bay. Let your nails breathe from time to time. This can help fade
discoloration, with just the white one.

* Use a powerful detoxifier like Himalayan pink salt and dissolve it in water. It draws out toxins from the adipose tissues, resulting in the body feeling lighter and more energised. It also further reduces muscle soreness and cramps.

* Add an essential oil of your choice to your foot soak, to make the process a bit more relaxing.

* If you need to further exfoliate, use scrubs with kernels of apricot, almond, walnut or pine nut, as these make excellent natural polishers without being too harsh on the skin.

* Use a rose oil as it is hydrating, antimicrobial, and good for muscle pulls and cramps. It is also relaxing, and helps dissipate anxiety. Lavender is another great option, if you are looking to go to bed straight after the regime.

Peppermint, thyme, tea tree, and eucalyptus essential oils are also antibacterial, deodorising, analgesic, and good for healing infections and wounds. Cedarwood and basil oils work well for soreness.

* Push back cuticles with the right tool and cut and clean your nails at this stage.

* Finally, wipe your hands and feet with a soft towel, and use a richly hydrating cream. Any good one designed for hand and foot care, would have natural butters like almond, cocoa, shea, mango, and kokum (mangosteen).

* For those who enjoy oil massages, natural herb, bark, and spice formulations, blended in healing oils, are highly recommended. Sesame oil is a quintessential go-to in Indian households. Massage oils with pain-relieving pepper, camphor, ashwagandha, manjishtha, and lavender or sandalwood are ideal.

feets
feets, flickr

For a fuss-free, efficient clean-up of the oil, wrap your hands or feet in a hot towel for a few minutes, then gently wipe as you pull the towel off.

* Put socks on your feet, so that the warmth and moisture of the cream remains locked in. A useful tip if you are going to bed straight after, so all the creamy hydration soaks into your skin through the night.

Also read: Healing herbs for postpartum body

* Apply sunscreen to your feet. Do not just halt to ankle, go on to put sunscreen on your feet as well. These not only protect your feet, but also protect protein made nails that are more defenceless to sun damage. (IANS)

Next Story

Strange Little Lemur Native to Madagascar Boasts One of the Most Unusual Hands in Animal Kingdom

This "pseudothumb," as North Carolina State University biologist Adam Hartstone-Rose calls it, represents one of the few examples

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Lemur, Madagascar, Hands
Ring-tailed lemur eats iced food at a zoo in Rome, Italy, June 27, 2019. VOA

For a strange little lemur native to Madagascar that boasts one of the most unusual hands in the animal kingdom, a “high five” is more like a “trick six.”

Scientists have discovered that this nocturnal tree dweller, called an aye-aye, possesses an anatomical structure that serves as an extra thumb to go along with its five spindly fingers, an evolutionary innovation helpful for grasping small objects and branches.

This “pseudothumb,” as North Carolina State University biologist Adam Hartstone-Rose calls it, represents one of the few examples since the very first land-dwelling vertebrates appeared almost 400 million years ago of a creature acquiring through evolution the equivalent of an extra digit.

It is not an actual finger, but rather an evolutionary improvisation that builds on the wrist structure, with an augmented wrist bone accompanied by a cartilaginous extension, three muscles that move it and even a fingerprint. The pseudothumb is strong, able to exert an amount of force equal to almost half its total body weight.

Lemur, Madagascar, Hands
Scientists have discovered that this nocturnal tree dweller, called an aye-aye, possesses an anatomical structure that serves as an extra thumb to go along with its five spindly fingers. Pixabay

“The weirdest primate is even weirder than we knew,” said Hartstone-Rose, who lead the research published this week in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology.

The giant panda also possesses a pseudothumb – with strikingly similar anatomy – that helps the bear with grasping bamboo.

Lemurs are among the most primitive members of the primate mammalian group that also includes monkeys, apes and humans.

The aye-aye is known for its huge bat-like ears, the largest relative brain size of any lemur, rodent-like ever-growing incisors – unique among primates – and strange hands. It has long fingers including its actual thumbs, and its middle fingers have a ball-and-socket joint like a person’s shoulders – also unique among primates.

Also Read- Fossil Discovery Points to ‘Origin of Modern World’ after Dinosaur Extinction

“The animals are crazy looking and their hands are so spindly that they really look like a pile of twigs. I usually describe the aye-aye as looking more or less like a mangy cat walking on spiders,” Hartstone-Rose said.

“To some of us, aye-ayes are horrible looking. To others they are so ugly that they are cute. They sincerely look like something that Jim Henson created to bring an Edgar Allan Poe nightmare to life,” Hartstone-Rose added, referring to the creator of “The Muppets” and the macabre 19th century writer.

The aye-aye’s fingers are not great for grasping – hence the need for a pseudothumb – but are perfect for its unusual “tap foraging” behavior. It taps on rotting wood with its middle finger and listens for voids. Using bat-like echolocation, it creates a mental map of the paths carved by grubs. It then uses its chisel-like incisors to cut holes in those tubes and uses its swiveling finger to get at the grubs.

Digital reduction has been very common in evolution, as seen in dinosaurs like Tyrannosaurus rex and hoofed mammals like horses. An improvised extra digit is extremely rare, with just a few examples. Cotton rats have a pseudothumb and certain moles and extinct marine reptiles called ichthyosaurs evolved different forms of an extra digit. (VOA)